On-Demand   On-Demand Web Programs

Mental Health Issues & the New York State Courts 2018: Why Trauma Matters to Judges and Lawyers

Released on: May. 23, 2018
Running Time: 06:10:24
Approximately 20 percent of Americans experience some type of mental illness in a given year, and the prevalence of mental disorders among individuals involved in the criminal justice system, and some areas of the civil legal system, is even higher. At this year’s Mental Health Issues & the New York State Courts 2018 a multi-disciplinary faculty will discuss the impact of trauma on mental health issues in the civil and criminal legal systems.

Practising Law Institute gratefully acknowledges the support and assistance of the New York State Courts Office of Court Administration and the CUCS Academy for Justice-Informed Practice. 

Lecture Topics [Total time 06:10:24]

Segments with an asterisk (*) are available only with the purchase of the entire program.

  • Opening Remarks* [00:19:56]
    Carol Fisler, Esq., Hon. Sherry Klein Heitler
  • The Faces of Trauma: Why Judges and Lawyers Need to Recognize and Respond to Trauma Histories of Litigants, Witnesses & Clients [01:21:39]
    Carol Fisler, Esq., Afua Addo, MA, MHC, Hon. Marcia P. Hirsch, Kenton Kirby, LMSW, Professor Sara E. Gold
  • Understanding and Responding to Trauma in Justice-Involved Individuals [01:30:00]
    Christine Edwards, Esq., Anthony K. Waters, Psy.D.
  • A Trauma-Informed Justice System [01:28:45]
    Carol Fisler, Esq., Professor Sara E. Gold, Miriam Goodman, LMSW, Hon. Toko Serita
  • Vicarious Trauma & Self-Care [01:01:30]
    Mary Beth Hennen-Anderson, Esq., LMSW, Aisha S. Greene, Esq., Andrew P. Levin, MD, Christine Bruno, Esq.
  • Ethical Responsibilities of Lawyers: Recognizing and Responding to Vicarious Trauma and Stress in Self and Others* [00:28:34]
    Mary Beth Hennen-Anderson, Esq., LMSW, Aisha S. Greene, Esq., Christine Bruno, Esq.

The purchase price of this Web Program includes the following articles from the Course Handbook available online:

  • COMPLETE COURSE HANDBOOK
  • Why Trauma Matters to Judges and Lawyers: Program Overview (March 22, 2018)
    Carol Fisler
  • Trauma’s Influence on the Lawyer-Client Relationship
    Sara E. Gold
  • Responding to Trauma Among Young Men of Color: Adapting the Crown Heights Approach for Your Community
    Katie Crank, Kenton Kirby
  • Judicial Perspectives on the Role of Trauma on Court Participants and Their Behavior
    Marcia P. Hirsch
  • Adverse Community Experiences and Resilience: A Framework for Addressing and Preventing Community Trauma
    Rachel A. Davis, Carol Fisler, Howard Pinderhughes, Myesha Williams
  • Brain, Body, Behavior: Understanding Trauma and its Relevance to the Courts
    Anthony K. Waters
  • Human Trafficking Intervention Courts: Why Trauma-Informed Courts Are Necessary for Survivors of Trafficking
    Toko Serita
  • Trauma-Informed Lawyering: Philosophical Framework and Concrete Strategies
    Sara E. Gold
  • The Pedagogy of Trauma-Informed Lawyering (Spring 2016)
    Christine Edwards, Sarah Katz, Deeya Haldar
  • Essential Components of Trauma-Informed Judicial Practice: What Every Judge Needs to Know About Trauma
    Marcia P. Hirsh
  • Ten Things Every Juvenile Court Judge Should Know About Trauma and Delinquency
    Carly B. Dierkhising, Kristine Buffington, Shawn C. Marsh, Carol Fisler
  • Professional Quality of Life Scale
    Carol Fisler
  • Vicarious Trauma: The Professional’s Response to Traumatic Material
    Andrew P. Levin
  • Secondary Traumatic Stress: A Fact Sheet for Child-Serving Professionals
    Carol Fisler
  • Dealing with the Effects of Trauma—A Self-Help Guide
    Carol Fisler
  • Dealing with Behavioral Health Concerns and the Impact of Trauma: An Ethical Issue for Attorneys
    Mary Elizabeth Hennen-Anderson
  • Barbara F. Smith, Going Up River: Lawyer Discipline, Lawyer Assistance and the Legal Profession’s Response to Lawyer Alcoholism
    Carol Fisler
  • Job-Related Fatigue: Ethical Concerns for Lawyers and Judges
    Mary Elizabeth Hennen-Anderson
  • New York City Lawyer Assistance Program Brochure
    Carol Fisler
  • Alcohol & Drug Use Questionnaire—NYC Bar Lawyer Assistance Program
    Carol Fisler
  • Relevant Citations: Mental Health Issues & the New York State Courts 2018

Presentation Material

  • Gender and Trauma Based Approach to Systems-Involved Women: Specialized Court Responses to Victim-Defendants
    Afua Addo, MA MHC
  • Brain, Body, Behavior: Understanding Trauma and its Relevance to the Courts
    Anthony K. Waters, Psy.D.
  • The Trauma-Informed Lawyer
    Professor Sara E. Gold
  • Vicarious Trauma: The Professional’s Response to Traumatic Material
    Andrew P. Levin, MD
Chairperson(s)
Carol Fisler, Esq. ~ Consultant, Mental Health/Criminal Justice Collaborations,
Speaker(s)
Afua Addo, MA, MHC ~ Coordinator, Gender and Justice Initiatives, Center For Court Innovation
Christine Bruno, Esq. ~ Litigation and Training Supervisor, Center for Family Representation
Christine Edwards, Esq. ~ Assistant Deputy Counsel, Office of Policy and Planning, NYS Unified Court System, Office of Court Administration
Professor Sara E. Gold ~ Clinical Law Instructor, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law
Miriam Goodman, LMSW ~ Clinical Director, JusticeHome, Women's Prison Association
Aisha S. Greene, Esq. ~ Bureau Chief, Alternatives to Incarceration Bureau, Office of the Bronx District Attorney
Mary Beth Hennen-Anderson, Esq., LMSW ~ Managing Director, Urban Justice Center Mental Health Project
Hon. Marcia P. Hirsch ~ Presiding Justice, Queens Supreme Court, Criminal Term
Kenton Kirby, LMSW ~ Director of Clinical and Trauma Support Services, Crown Heights Community Mediation Center, Center For Court Innovation
Hon. Sherry Klein Heitler ~ Supreme Court, New York County
Andrew P. Levin, MD ~ Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry, Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons
Hon. Toko Serita ~ New York City Criminal Court, Queens County
Anthony K. Waters, Psy.D. ~ Deputy Director of Mental Health Correctional Services, NYC Health and Hospitals Corporation
General credit information about this format appears below. For credit information specific to this program, please choose your jurisdiction(s) in the Credit Information box on the right-hand side of this page.

PLI’s live and on-demand webcasts are single-user license products intended for an individual registrant only. Credit will be issued only to the individual registered.


U.S. MCLE States

Alabama:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “online” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of online programs per reporting period.

Alaska:  All PLI products can fulfill Alaska’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Arizona:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “interactive CLE” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via interactive CLE programs.

Arkansas:  PLI’s on-demand web programs are not approved for Arkansas CLE credit.

California:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “participatory” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via participatory programs.

Colorado:  All PLI products can fulfill Colorado’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Connecticut: Effective January 1, 2017, all PLI products can fulfill Connecticut’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Delaware:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “eCLE” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of eCLE per reporting period, no more than 6 of which may be audio-only.

Florida:  All PLI products can fulfill Florida’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Georgia:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “in-house” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 in-house credits per reporting period.

Hawaii:  All PLI products can fulfill Hawaii’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Idaho:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 15 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Illinois:  All PLI products can fulfill Illinois' CLE requirements for experienced attorneys. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Indiana:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “distance education” credit. Attorneys are limited to 9 credits of distance education per reporting period. Effective January 1, 2019, the limit of distance education per reporting period will increase from 9 to 18 credits.

Iowa:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “unmoderated” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of unmoderated programs per reporting period.

Kansas:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “prerecorded” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of prerecorded programs per reporting period.

Kentucky:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “non-live” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 non-live credits per reporting period.

Louisiana:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 4 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Maine:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 5.5 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Minnesota:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “on-demand” credit. Attorneys are limited to 15 on-demand credits per reporting period.

Mississippi:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “distance learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of distance learning per reporting period.

Missouri:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Montana:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 5 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Nebraska:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “computer-based learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 5 credits of computer-based learning per reporting period.

Nevada:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via self-study programs.

New Hampshire:  All PLI products can fulfill New Hampshire’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

New Jersey:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “alternative verifiable learning formats” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of alternative verifiable learning formats per reporting period.

New Mexico:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 4 credits of self-study per reporting period.

New York

Experienced Attorneys:  All PLI products can fulfill New York’s CLE requirements for experienced attorneys. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Newly Admitted Attorneys:  PLI’s transitional on-demand web programs can be used to fulfill the requirements for New York newly admitted attorneys. Only professional practice and law practice management credits may be earned via transitional on-demand web programs. Ethics and skills credits may not be earned via on-demand web programs.

North Carolina:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “online” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of online programs per reporting period.

North Dakota:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 15 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Ohio:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Oklahoma:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “online, on-demand” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of online, on-demand programs per reporting period.

Oregon:  All PLI products can fulfill Oregon’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Pennsylvania:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “distance learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of distance learning per reporting period.

Puerto Rico:  All PLI products can fulfill Puerto Rico’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Rhode Island:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “video replay” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 video replay credits per reporting period.

South Carolina:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “alternatively delivered” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of alternatively delivered programs per reporting period.

Tennessee:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “distance learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 8 credits of distance learning per reporting period.

Texas:  All PLI products can fulfill Texas’ CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Utah:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Vermont:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 10 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Virgin Islands:  All PLI products can fulfill the Virgin Islands’ CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Virginia:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “pre-recorded” credit. Attorneys are limited to 8 credits of pre-recorded programs per reporting period.

Washington:  All PLI products can fulfill Washington’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

West Virginia:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “online” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of online instruction per reporting period.

Wisconsin:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “repeated, on-demand” credit. Attorneys are limited to 15 credits of repeated, on-demand programs per reporting period. No ethics credits can be earned via on-demand web programs.

Wyoming:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of self-study per reporting period.


CPD Jurisdictions

British Columbia (CPD-BC):  PLI’s on-demand web programs are not eligible for CPD-BC credit unless viewed with at least one other attorney or an articled student. In this case, the credit must be recorded as a “study group.”

Ontario (CPD-ON):  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “recorded” credit. If viewed without a colleague, attorneys are limited to 6 credits of recorded programs per year. If viewed with at least one colleague, there is no limit to the number of credits that can be earned via recorded programs.

Quebec (CPD-QC):  PLI’s on-demand web programs can fulfill Quebec’s CPD requirements.

Hong Kong (CPD-HK):  PLI’s on-demand web programs are not approved for CPD-HK credit.

United Kingdom (CPD-UK):  PLI’s on-demand web programs can fulfill the United Kingdom’s CPD requirements.

Australia (CPD-AUS):  PLI’s on-demand web programs may fulfill Australia’s CPD requirements. Credit limits for on-demand web programs vary according to jurisdiction. Please refer to your jurisdiction’s CPD information page for specifics.

Alberta (CPD-ALBERTA):  All PLI products can fulfill Alberta’s CPD requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Dubai (CLPD-DUBAI):  PLI’s on-demand web programs may fulfill CLPD credit requirements.


Other Credit Types

CPE Credit (NASBA):  Select on-demand web programs qualify as the “QAS Self-Study” delivery method. Please check the Credit Information box on the right-hand side of this page to verify CPE credit availability.

IRS Continuing Education (IRS-CE):  PLI’s on-demand web programs may fulfill IRS-CE requirements. To request IRS-CE credit, please notify PLI at plicredits@pli.edu of your request and include your Preparer Tax Identification Number (PTIN).

Certified Fraud Examiner CPE:  PLI’s on-demand web programs may fulfill Certified Fraud Examiner CPE requirements. To request CPE credit or find out which programs offer CPE, please contact PLI at plicredits@pli.edu.

IAPP Continuing Privacy Credit (CPE):  PLI’s on-demand web programs may fulfill Privacy CPE credit requirements.

HR Recertification (HRCI):  PLI’s on-demand web programs may fulfill HR credit requirements.

SHRM Recertification (SHRM):  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as "self-paced" credit. SHRM professionals are limited to 30 credits of self-paced programs per recertification period.

Compliance Certification Board (CCB):  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Candidates are limited to 10 self-study credits per 12-month period, and certification holders are limited to 20 self-study credits per 2-year renewal period.

Certified Anti-Money Laundering Specialists Certification (CAMS):  PLI’s on-demand web programs are not approved for CAMS credit.

New York State Social Worker Continuing Education (SW CPE):  PLI’s on-demand web programs are not approved for SW CPE credit.

American Bankers Association Professional Certification (ABA):  PLI’s on-demand web programs may fulfill ABA credit requirements.

Certified Financial Planners (CFP):  PLI’s on-demand web programs are not approved for CFP credit.

 

Related Items

Handbook  Course Handbook Archive

Mental Health Issues & the New York State Courts 2018: Why Trauma Matters to Judges and Lawyers Carol Fisler, Center for Court Innovation
 
Share
Email

  • FOLLOW PLI:
  • twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • YouTube
  • RSS

All Contents Copyright © 1996-2018 Practising Law Institute. Continuing Legal Education since 1933.

© 2018 PLI PRACTISING LAW INSTITUTE. All rights reserved. The PLI logo is a service mark of PLI.