Seminar  Program

Representing Unaccompanied Children in California: Legal Updates, Practice Considerations & Strategies for Pursuing Relief (Free)


Select a Location:

Why You Should Attend
Unaccompanied immigrant children (UCs) from Central America, Mexico and many other countries continue to seek protection in the United States, and many live in California as they go through immigration removal (deportation) proceedings and defend against deportation. Once apprehended by immigration authorities, UCs are placed in removal proceedings without government appointed counsel. Many children are eligible for relief, but attacks from the Administration on these protections make cases more challenging and the need for pro bono counsel even greater. Without an attorney to represent them, children face deportation to dangerous situations in their home countries. This one-day training builds upon prior PLI courses regarding the representation of UCs in California and incorporates legal updates, practice considerations, and strategies for representing UCs. Attorneys who work with immigrant youth, or pro bono attorneys interested in working on these issues, can learn about the most recent updates to Special Immigrant Juvenile Status (SIJS), UC asylum claims, T visas, as well as strategies for pursuing Motions to Terminate and Suppress.

What You Will Learn
• Removal defense strategies like motions to terminate and motions to suppress
• Overview of Special Immigrant Juvenile Status (SIJS) and strategies to pursue SIJS in light of policy changes
• Preventing and responding to Requests for Evidence and Notices of Intent to Deny SIJS petitions
• Strategies for pursuing SIJS state court predicate orders in family and probate court in California
• Jurisdictional and strategic considerations for UC asylum claims
• T visa updates and strategies for children

Who Should Attend
Attorneys interested in assisting or representing immigrant youth, firm pro bono coordinators and partners, law clinic students and faculty, public interest and nonprofit organization attorneys and staff, immigration advocates, and other providers working with immigrant youth.

PLI Group Discounts

Groups of 4-14 from the same organization, all registering at the same time, for a PLI program scheduled for presentation at the same site, are entitled to receive a group discount. For further discount information, please contact membership@pli.edu or call (800) 260-4PLI.

PLI Can Arrange Group Viewing to Your Firm

Contact the Groupcasts Department via email at groupcasts@pli.edu for more details.

Cancellations

All cancellations received 3 business days prior to the program will be refunded 100%. If you do not cancel within the allotted time period, payment is due in full. You may substitute another individual to attend the program at any time.

9:00 Opening Remarks
Katie Annand

9:10 Motions to Terminate and Suppress in Unaccompanied Children Cases
Many unaccompanied children have grounds to challenge their removal proceedings even beyond the traditional forms of relief.  Especially in light of the uncertainty of the continued existence of otherwise well-established forms of relief, attorneys need to use all the tools in their arsenal to defend their clients’ rights. This panel will discuss how to challenge service of the NTA, motions to suppress and terminate, including under the recent Supreme Court decision in Pereira, making the government meet its burden to prove alienage, as well as objecting to DHS evidence presented in the context of relief.
Lucero Chavez, Helen Lawrence

10:10 Overview of Special Immigrant Juvenile Status
Special Immigrant Juvenile Status (“SIJS”) is a humanitarian form of immigration relief for children who have been abandoned, abused or neglected by a parent. Unlike many other forms of immigration relief, SIJS requires the involvement of the state court system. This panel will provide a general introduction to the stages of a SIJS case, including the role of state juvenile courts, applying for SIJS with U.S. Citizenship & Immigration Services, and seeking adjustment of status (a green card) based on SIJS. We will discuss new strategies for success given the increasing challenges in SIJS cases.
Milli E. Atkinson, Marion (“Mickey”) Donovan, Rachel Prandini

11:10 Networking Break

11:25 Responding to SIJS Requests for Evidence (RFEs) and Notices of Intent to Deny (NOIDs)
This panel will discuss recent trends of increased requests for evidence (RFEs) and notices of intent to deny (NOIDs) in Special Immigrant Juvenile Status cases, as well as new USCIS policy that will likely result in more denials without issuance of an RFE or NOID. We will cover common fact patterns that have resulted in RFEs or NOIDs and discuss strategies for success – both in avoiding these requests to begin with, and in responding to RFEs, NOIDs, or denials if and when encountered.
Lucero Chavez, Kristen M. Jackson, Rachel Prandini

12:25 Lunch

1:15 Strategies for Pursuing SIJS Predicate Orders in California
Pursuing special findings in state court is a prerequisite to a child obtaining protection through Special Immigrant Juvenile Status.  Various considerations and challenges, apart from the child’s immigration case, may arise that require knowledge of state law practice and procedure.  This panel will identify strategies for successfully obtaining SIJ findings for your client in California probate and family court proceedings.
Erikson Albrecht, Katie Annand, Jenny Horne

2:15 Introduction to Children’s Asylum: Jurisdiction, Procedural, and Substantive Law
Important differences exist in the procedures and standards for children’s asylum cases versus adults. The panel will discuss who is considered an unaccompanied child, how to challenge an adverse jurisdictional finding, and an overview of the affirmative versus defensive asylum process for UCs. This panel will also cover substantive asylum law for children’s cases, including ways to establish the elements of asylum, responses to potential bars, updates in the law, and challenges to types of claims (such as child abuse and fear-of-gang). Using illustrative hypotheticals, the panel will discuss strategies for crafting legal theories in children’s asylum cases and provide practice pointers.
Cecilia Candia, Christine Lin, Ana Moraga Archila

3:45 Networking Break

4:00 T Visa Updates and Emerging Trends Affecting Youth Survivors of Trafficking
This advanced T visa training will address regulatory and policy updates, emerging trends affecting youth survivors of trafficking, how to address Requests for Evidence (RFEs) and denials, and strategizing around the filing of T visas in addition to or in lieu of other forms of immigration relief for minors.
Cindy Liou, Lynette M. Parker, Sara Van Hofwegen

5:00 Adjourn

Co-Chair(s)
Katie Annand ~ Managing Attorney, Kids in Need of Defense (KIND)
Lucero Chavez ~ Senior Staff Attorney - Immigrants' Rights Project, Public Counsel
Rachel Prandini ~ Staff Attorney, Immigrant Legal Resource Center
Speaker(s)
Erikson Albrecht ~ Directing Attorney, Bet Tzedek Legal Services
Milli E. Atkinson ~ Supervising Attorney, Immigration Center for Women and Children
Cecilia Candia ~ Senior Staff Attorney, Legal Services For Children Inc
Marion ("Mickey") Donovan-Kaloust ~ Managing Attorney, Immigrant Defenders Law Center
Jenny Horne ~ Senior Attorney, Legal Aid Society of San Mateo County
Kristen M. Jackson ~ Senior Staff Attorney, Public Counsel
Helen Lawrence ~ Law Office of Helen Lawrence
Christine Lin ~ Directing Attorney, Center for Gender & Refugee Studies – California
Cindy C. Liou ~ Deputy Director of Legal Services, Kids in Need of Defense (KIND)
Ana Moraga Archila ~ Direct Representation Attorney, Kids in Need of Defense (KIND)
Lynette M. Parker ~ Associate Clinical Professor, Katharine & George Alexander Community Law Center, Santa Clara University School of Law
Sara Van Hofwegen ~ Supervising Senior Staff Attorney – Immigrants’ Rights Project, Public Counsel
Program Attorney(s)
Christina Thompson ~ Senior Pro Bono Program Attorney, Practising Law Institute
General credit information about this format appears below. For credit information specific to this program, please choose your jurisdiction(s) in the Credit Information box on the right-hand side of this page.

PLI’s live and on-demand webcasts are single-user license products intended for an individual registrant only. Credit will be issued only to the individual registered. If two or more individuals wish to participate in a webcast and receive credit, PLI would be happy to provide a Groupcast – group viewing of a webcast. To schedule a Groupcast, please contact PLI at groupcasts@pli.edu.


U.S. MCLE States

Alabama:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Alaska:  All PLI products can fulfill Alaska’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Arizona:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “interactive CLE” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via interactive CLE programs.

Arkansas:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

California:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “participatory” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via participatory programs.

Colorado:  All PLI products can fulfill Colorado’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Connecticut: Effective January 1, 2017, all PLI products can fulfill Connecticut’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Delaware:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “eCLE” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of eCLE per reporting period.

Florida:  All PLI products can fulfill Florida’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Georgia:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “in-house” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 in-house credits per reporting period.

Hawaii:  All PLI products can fulfill Hawaii’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Idaho:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Illinois:  All PLI products can fulfill Illinois' CLE requirements for experienced attorneys. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Indiana:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “distance education” credit. Attorneys are limited to 9 credits of distance education per reporting period.

Iowa:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Kansas:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Kentucky:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Louisiana:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 4 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Maine:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Minnesota:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Mississippi:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “distance learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of distance learning per reporting period.

Missouri:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Montana:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Nebraska:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “computer-based learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 5 credits of computer-based learning per reporting period.

Nevada:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

New Hampshire:  All PLI products can fulfill New Hampshire’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

New Jersey:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “alternative verifiable learning formats” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of alternative verifiable learning formats per reporting period.

New Mexico:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

New York

Experienced Attorneys:  All PLI products can fulfill New York’s CLE requirements for experienced attorneys. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Newly Admitted Attorneys:  PLI’s transitional live webcasts can be used to fulfill the requirements for New York newly admitted attorneys. Ethics credit, professional practice credit, and law practice management credit may be earned via transitional live webcasts. Skills credits may not be earned via live webcasts.

North Carolina:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

North Dakota:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Ohio:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Oklahoma:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Oregon:  All PLI products can fulfill Oregon’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Pennsylvania:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “distance learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of distance learning per reporting period.

Puerto Rico:  All PLI products can fulfill Puerto Rico’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Rhode Island:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

South Carolina:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “alternatively delivered” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of alternatively delivered programs per reporting period.

Tennessee:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “distance learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 8 credits of distance learning per reporting period.

Texas:  All PLI products can fulfill Texas’ CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Utah:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Vermont:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Virgin Islands:  All PLI products can fulfill the Virgin Islands’ CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Virginia:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live interactive” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live interactive programs.

Washington:  All PLI products can fulfill Washington’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

West Virginia:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “online” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of online instruction per reporting period.

Wisconsin:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Wyoming:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

CPD Jurisdictions

British Columbia (CPD-BC):  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “real-time” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via real-time programs.

Ontario (CPD-ON):  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “interactive” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via interactive programs.

Quebec (CPD-QC):  PLI’s live webcasts can fulfill Quebec’s CPD requirements.

Hong Kong (CPD-HK):  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “distance learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 15 points of distance learning programs per reporting period.

United Kingdom (CPD-UK):  PLI’s live webcasts can fulfill the United Kingdom’s CPD requirements.

Australia (CPD-AUS):  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill Australia’s CPD requirements. Credit limits for live webcasts vary according to jurisdiction. Please refer to your jurisdiction’s CPD information page for specifics.

Alberta (CPD-ALBERTA):  All PLI products can fulfill Alberta’s CPD requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Dubai (CLPD-DUBAI):  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill CLPD credit requirements.

Other Credit Types

CPE Credit (NASBA):  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as the “Group-Internet-Based” (GIB) delivery method. Please check the Credit Information box on the right-hand side of this page to verify CPE credit availability.

IRS Continuing Education (IRS-CE):  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill IRS-CE requirements. To request IRS-CE credit, please notify PLI at plicredits@pli.edu of your request and include your Preparer Tax Identification Number (PTIN).

Certified Fraud Examiner CPE:  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill Certified Fraud Examiner CPE requirements. To request CPE credit or find out which programs offer CPE, please contact PLI at plicredits@pli.edu.

IAPP Continuing Privacy Credit (CPE):  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill Privacy CPE credit requirements.

HR Recertification (HRCI):  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill HR credit requirements.

SHRM Recertification (SHRM):  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as "instructor-led" credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an SHRM professional can earn via instructor-led programs.

Compliance Certification Board (CCB):  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” training events. There is no limit to the number of credits a candidate or certification holder can earn via live programs.

Certified Anti-Money Laundering Specialists (CAMS):  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill CAMS credit requirements.

New York State Social Worker Continuing Education (SW CPE):  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill SW CPE credit requirements.

American Bankers Association Professional Certification (ABA):  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill ABA credit requirements.

Certified Financial Planners (CFP):  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill CFP credit requirements.

 

Why You Should Attend
Unaccompanied immigrant children (UCs) from Central America, Mexico and many other countries continue to seek protection in the United States, and many live in California as they go through immigration removal (deportation) proceedings and defend against deportation. Once apprehended by immigration authorities, UCs are placed in removal proceedings without government appointed counsel. Many children are eligible for relief, but attacks from the Administration on these protections make cases more challenging and the need for pro bono counsel even greater. Without an attorney to represent them, children face deportation to dangerous situations in their home countries. This one-day training builds upon prior PLI courses regarding the representation of UCs in California and incorporates legal updates, practice considerations, and strategies for representing UCs. Attorneys who work with immigrant youth, or pro bono attorneys interested in working on these issues, can learn about the most recent updates to Special Immigrant Juvenile Status (SIJS), UC asylum claims, T visas, as well as strategies for pursuing Motions to Terminate and Suppress.

What You Will Learn
• Removal defense strategies like motions to terminate and motions to suppress
• Overview of Special Immigrant Juvenile Status (SIJS) and strategies to pursue SIJS in light of policy changes
• Preventing and responding to Requests for Evidence and Notices of Intent to Deny SIJS petitions
• Strategies for pursuing SIJS state court predicate orders in family and probate court in California
• Jurisdictional and strategic considerations for UC asylum claims
• T visa updates and strategies for children

Who Should Attend
Attorneys interested in assisting or representing immigrant youth, firm pro bono coordinators and partners, law clinic students and faculty, public interest and nonprofit organization attorneys and staff, immigration advocates, and other providers working with immigrant youth.

PLI Group Discounts

Groups of 4-14 from the same organization, all registering at the same time, for a PLI program scheduled for presentation at the same site, are entitled to receive a group discount. For further discount information, please contact membership@pli.edu or call (800) 260-4PLI.

PLI Can Arrange Group Viewing to Your Firm

Contact the Groupcasts Department via email at groupcasts@pli.edu for more details.

Cancellations

All cancellations received 3 business days prior to the program will be refunded 100%. If you do not cancel within the allotted time period, payment is due in full. You may substitute another individual to attend the program at any time.

9:00 Opening Remarks
Katie Annand

9:10 Motions to Terminate and Suppress in Unaccompanied Children Cases
Many unaccompanied children have grounds to challenge their removal proceedings even beyond the traditional forms of relief.  Especially in light of the uncertainty of the continued existence of otherwise well-established forms of relief, attorneys need to use all the tools in their arsenal to defend their clients’ rights. This panel will discuss how to challenge service of the NTA, motions to suppress and terminate, including under the recent Supreme Court decision in Pereira, making the government meet its burden to prove alienage, as well as objecting to DHS evidence presented in the context of relief.
Lucero Chavez, Helen Lawrence

10:10 Overview of Special Immigrant Juvenile Status
Special Immigrant Juvenile Status (“SIJS”) is a humanitarian form of immigration relief for children who have been abandoned, abused or neglected by a parent. Unlike many other forms of immigration relief, SIJS requires the involvement of the state court system. This panel will provide a general introduction to the stages of a SIJS case, including the role of state juvenile courts, applying for SIJS with U.S. Citizenship & Immigration Services, and seeking adjustment of status (a green card) based on SIJS. We will discuss new strategies for success given the increasing challenges in SIJS cases.
Milli E. Atkinson, Marion (“Mickey”) Donovan, Rachel Prandini

11:10 Networking Break

11:25 Responding to SIJS Requests for Evidence (RFEs) and Notices of Intent to Deny (NOIDs)
This panel will discuss recent trends of increased requests for evidence (RFEs) and notices of intent to deny (NOIDs) in Special Immigrant Juvenile Status cases, as well as new USCIS policy that will likely result in more denials without issuance of an RFE or NOID. We will cover common fact patterns that have resulted in RFEs or NOIDs and discuss strategies for success – both in avoiding these requests to begin with, and in responding to RFEs, NOIDs, or denials if and when encountered.
Lucero Chavez, Kristen M. Jackson, Rachel Prandini

12:25 Lunch

1:15 Strategies for Pursuing SIJS Predicate Orders in California
Pursuing special findings in state court is a prerequisite to a child obtaining protection through Special Immigrant Juvenile Status.  Various considerations and challenges, apart from the child’s immigration case, may arise that require knowledge of state law practice and procedure.  This panel will identify strategies for successfully obtaining SIJ findings for your client in California probate and family court proceedings.
Erikson Albrecht, Katie Annand, Jenny Horne

2:15 Introduction to Children’s Asylum: Jurisdiction, Procedural, and Substantive Law
Important differences exist in the procedures and standards for children’s asylum cases versus adults. The panel will discuss who is considered an unaccompanied child, how to challenge an adverse jurisdictional finding, and an overview of the affirmative versus defensive asylum process for UCs. This panel will also cover substantive asylum law for children’s cases, including ways to establish the elements of asylum, responses to potential bars, updates in the law, and challenges to types of claims (such as child abuse and fear-of-gang). Using illustrative hypotheticals, the panel will discuss strategies for crafting legal theories in children’s asylum cases and provide practice pointers.
Cecilia Candia, Christine Lin, Ana Moraga Archila

3:45 Networking Break

4:00 T Visa Updates and Emerging Trends Affecting Youth Survivors of Trafficking
This advanced T visa training will address regulatory and policy updates, emerging trends affecting youth survivors of trafficking, how to address Requests for Evidence (RFEs) and denials, and strategizing around the filing of T visas in addition to or in lieu of other forms of immigration relief for minors.
Cindy Liou, Lynette M. Parker, Sara Van Hofwegen

5:00 Adjourn

Co-Chair(s)
Katie Annand ~ Managing Attorney, Kids in Need of Defense (KIND)
Lucero Chavez ~ Senior Staff Attorney - Immigrants' Rights Project, Public Counsel
Rachel Prandini ~ Staff Attorney, Immigrant Legal Resource Center
Speaker(s)
Erikson Albrecht ~ Directing Attorney, Bet Tzedek Legal Services
Milli E. Atkinson ~ Supervising Attorney, Immigration Center for Women and Children
Cecilia Candia ~ Senior Staff Attorney, Legal Services For Children Inc
Marion ("Mickey") Donovan-Kaloust ~ Managing Attorney, Immigrant Defenders Law Center
Jenny Horne ~ Senior Attorney, Legal Aid Society of San Mateo County
Kristen M. Jackson ~ Senior Staff Attorney, Public Counsel
Helen Lawrence ~ Law Office of Helen Lawrence
Christine Lin ~ Directing Attorney, Center for Gender & Refugee Studies – California
Cindy C. Liou ~ Deputy Director of Legal Services, Kids in Need of Defense (KIND)
Ana Moraga Archila ~ Direct Representation Attorney, Kids in Need of Defense (KIND)
Lynette M. Parker ~ Associate Clinical Professor, Katharine & George Alexander Community Law Center, Santa Clara University School of Law
Sara Van Hofwegen ~ Supervising Senior Staff Attorney – Immigrants’ Rights Project, Public Counsel
Program Attorney(s)
Christina Thompson ~ Senior Pro Bono Program Attorney, Practising Law Institute

San Francisco Seminar Location

PLI California Center, 685 Market Street, San Francisco, California 94105. (800) 260-4754.

San Francisco Hotel Accommodations

Park Central Hotel, 50 Third Street, San Francisco, CA 94103. 415-974-6400. When calling, please mention PLI and SET#287179. In addition, you may book online at Park Central Hotel PLI.

Omni Hotel San Francisco, 500 California Street, San Francisco, CA 94104. 415-677-9494.  When calling, please mention Practising Law Institute.  You may also book online at PLI Omni 2018.

Due to high demand we recommend reserving hotel rooms as early as possible.

General credit information about this format appears below. For credit information specific to this program, please choose your jurisdiction(s) in the Credit Information box on the right-hand side of this page.


U.S. MCLE States

Alabama: PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Alaska:  All PLI products can fulfill Alaska’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Arizona:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “interactive CLE” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via interactive CLE programs.

Arkansas:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

California:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “participatory” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via participatory programs.

Colorado:  All PLI products can fulfill Colorado’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Connecticut: Effective January 1, 2017, all PLI products can fulfill Connecticut’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Delaware:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Florida:  All PLI products can fulfill Florida’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Georgia:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Hawaii:  All PLI products can fulfill Hawaii’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Idaho:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Illinois: All PLI products can fulfill Illinois' CLE requirements for experienced attorneys. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Indiana:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Iowa:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Kansas:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live programs.

Kentucky:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Louisiana:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Maine:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Minnesota:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Mississippi:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Missouri:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Montana:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Nebraska:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Nevada:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

New Hampshire:  All PLI products can fulfill New Hampshire’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

New Jersey:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

New Mexico:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

New York

Experienced Attorneys:  All PLI products can fulfill New York’s CLE requirements for experienced attorneys. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Newly Admitted Attorneys:  PLI’s transitional live seminars can be used to fulfill the requirements for newly admitted attorneys. All credit categories may be earned via transitional live seminars.

North Carolina:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars

North Dakota:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Ohio:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Oklahoma:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Oregon:  All PLI products can fulfill Oregon’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Pennsylvania: PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Puerto Rico:  All PLI products can fulfill Puerto Rico’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Rhode Island:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

South Carolina:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Tennessee:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Texas:  All PLI products can fulfill Texas’ CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Utah:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Vermont:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Virgin Islands:  All PLI products can fulfill the Virgin Islands’ CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Virginia:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live interactive” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live interactive programs.

Washington:  All PLI products can fulfill Washington’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

West Virginia:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Wisconsin:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Wyoming:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

CPD Jurisdictions

British Columbia (CPD-BC):  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “real-time” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via real-time programs.

Ontario (CPD-ON):  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “interactive” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via interactive programs.

Quebec (CPD-QC): PLI’s live seminars can fulfill Quebec’s CPD requirements.

Hong Kong (CPD-HK):  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of points an attorney can earn via live seminars.

United Kingdom (CPD-UK):  PLI’s live seminars can fulfill the United Kingdom’s CPD requirements.

Australia (CPD-AUS):  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit in all Australian jurisdictions. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Alberta (CPD-ALBERTA):  All PLI products can fulfill Alberta’s CPD requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Dubai (CLPD-DUBAI):  PLI’s live seminars may fulfill CLPD credit requirements.

Other Credit Types

CPE Credit (NASBA): PLI’s live seminars qualify as the “Group-Live” delivery method. Please check the Credit Information box on the right-hand side of this page to verify CPE credit availability.

IRS Continuing Education (IRS-CE): PLI’s live seminars may fulfill IRS-CE requirements. To request IRS-CE credit, please notify PLI at plicredits@pli.edu of your request and include your Preparer Tax Identification Number (PTIN).

Certified Fraud Examiner CPE:  PLI’s live seminars may fulfill Certified Fraud Examiner CPE requirements. To request CPE credit or find out which programs offer CPE, please contact PLI at plicredits@pli.edu.

IAPP Continuing Privacy Credit (CPE):  PLI’s live seminars may fulfill Privacy CPE credit requirements.

HR Recertification (HRCI):  PLI’s live seminars may fulfill HR credit requirements.

SHRM Recertification (SHRM):  PLI’s live seminars qualify as "instructor-led" credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an SHRM professional can earn via instructor-led programs.

Compliance Certification Board (CCB):  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” training events. There is no limit to the number of credits a candidate or certification holder can earn via live programs.

Certified Anti-Money Laundering Specialists (CAMS):  PLI’s live seminars may fulfill CAMS credit requirements.

New York State Social Worker Continuing Education (SW CPE):  PLI’s live seminars may fulfill SW CPE credit requirements.

American Bankers Association Professional Certification (ABA):  PLI’s live seminars may fulfill ABA credit requirements.

Certified Financial Planners (CFP):  PLI’s live seminars may fulfill CFP credit requirements.

 

Share
Email

  • FOLLOW PLI:
  • twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • YouTube
  • RSS

All Contents Copyright © 1996-2018 Practising Law Institute. Continuing Legal Education since 1933.

© 2018 PLI PRACTISING LAW INSTITUTE. All rights reserved. The PLI logo is a service mark of PLI.