Seminar  Program

Representing Modest Means Homeowners in Association Disputes: Key California Statutes and Consumer Protections (Free)


Select a Location:

Why You Should Attend
Though created by state and local governments, homeowner associations are not regulated by either entity once the developer turns control of the subdivision over to the homeowner board.  Nor does a single regulatory agency enforce the consumer rights of buyers who purchase association homes.  Enforcement of consumer rights – to the extent they even exist – is achieved almost solely through private action.

About 14 million Californians now live in the state’s 52,000 townhomes, co-ops, condos, and planned subdivisions managed by associations.  The majority are homeowners of modest means.  When disputes arise – over assessment collection, for example – the association corporation typically has an attorney, while the modest means homeowner does not.  Representing modest means homeowners in association disputes is a field with enormous demand but few practitioners.

What You Will Learn
This training will introduce the new practitioner to statutes governing consumer rights in three key areas: assessment collection, transparency in association financial operations, and election statutes (used not only to elect board directors, but to set certain assessments.)  The training will also benefit practitioners, who have represented homeowners in the past, but want to deepen their understanding of the complex statutes governing associations.  The goal of the training is to provide participants with tools for representing modest means homeowners.

Who Should Attend
Consumer protection and real estate attorneys interested in expanding their practice to include modest means homeowners; lawyers who would like to extend their practices into the growing field of homeowner association law; elder law attorneys, who want to learn how to assist senior clients with homeowner association issues, particularly foreclosure by the association; pro bono attorneys, legal services attorneys, self-help attorneys, limited scope representation attorneys, small claims advisors; lawyers who want to test their aptitude for association law by first expanding their practice into small claims assistance.1


1 Existing California law lets homeowners bring specific homeowner association disputes into small claims court.  However, given the complexity of the law, homeowners need guidance in preparing the pleadings correctly.


PLI Group Discounts

Groups of 4-14 from the same organization, all registering at the same time, for a PLI program scheduled for presentation at the same site, are entitled to receive a group discount. For further discount information, please contact membership@pli.edu or call (800) 260-4PLI.

PLI Can Arrange Group Viewing to Your Firm

Contact the Groupcasts Department via email at groupcasts@pli.edu for more details.

Cancellations

All cancellations received 3 business days prior to the program will be refunded 100%. If you do not cancel within the allotted time period, payment is due in full. You may substitute another individual to attend the program at any time.

9:00 Opening Remarks
Marjorie Murray

9:05 Consumer Rights in California Common Interest Developments: Transparency in Association Records

Policy and legal framework for discussion: quasi-governmental nature of common interest developments (CIDs); its hybrid legal framework and powers; fiscal reasons for the growth of California CIDs; owner demographics; lack of regulation of CIDs: enforcement of homeowner consumer rights through private action in the courts; the infrastructure of the association industry; hierarchy of governing documents.

The Homeowner’s Right to Transparency
The homeowner’s longstanding right to association records; the need for transparency; legislation (AB1098/2005) modeled on the Public Records Act; defines “records”, the process for retrieving them, permissible redactions and changes; resistance of the association industry to transparency; recourse for the homeowner through small claims court; relief that the court might order, including recovery of costs.  Recent cases brought by homeowners to county district attorneys and U.S. Attorneys.
Commissioner Dave Jones, Marjorie Murray



10:05 Limits on Assessment Collection and the Association’s Power to Foreclose
Types of assessments the association can levy; analyzing whether the assessment itself is valid; notice and disclosure issues; key actors in assessment collection; collection tools; statutory limits on the association’s power to set assessments; the homeowner’s right to challenge the association’s accounting of the debt; measuring assessment collection practices against state and federal Fair Debt Collection statutes and the Business and Professions Code.  Recent class actions, key California Appellate rulings, and a 2017 9th Circuit opinion on association assessment collection.
Justin T. Berger, Esq.

11:05 Networking Break

11:15 Fairness and Integrity in Association Elections

Role of elections in CIDs; events governed by election statutes; public elections and CID elections compared; potential defendants in an elections case; Election Operating Rules: formation and adoption; quorum issues and cumulative voting; ballots v. proxies; role of the Inspector of Elections; challenging election procedures and outcomes in small claims court; remedies the court might order; discussion of Wittenberg v Beachwalk HOA (2013) 217 Cal. App. 41 654.; Q&A with the expert faculty.
Eric M. Schiffer, Esq.

12:30 Adjourn



Chairperson(s)
Marjorie Murray ~ President, Center for California Homeowner Association Law
Speaker(s)
Justin T. Berger ~ Principal, Cotchett Pitre McCarthy, LLP
Commissioner Dave Jones ~ California Insurance Commissioner, former Chair of the California Assembly Judiciary Committee, California Department of Insurance
Eric M. Schiffer ~ Founder, Schiffer & Buus, LLC
Program Attorney(s)
Christina Thompson ~ Senior Pro Bono Program Attorney, Practising Law Institute
General credit information about this format appears below. For credit information specific to this program, please choose your jurisdiction(s) in the Credit Information box on the right-hand side of this page.

PLI’s live and on-demand webcasts are single-user license products intended for an individual registrant only. Credit will be issued only to the individual registered. If two or more individuals wish to participate in a webcast and receive credit, PLI would be happy to provide a Groupcast – group viewing of a webcast. To schedule a Groupcast, please contact PLI at groupcasts@pli.edu.


U.S. MCLE States

Alabama:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Alaska:  All PLI products can fulfill Alaska’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Arizona:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “interactive CLE” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via interactive CLE programs.

Arkansas:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

California:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “participatory” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via participatory programs.

Colorado:  All PLI products can fulfill Colorado’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Connecticut: Effective January 1, 2017, all PLI products can fulfill Connecticut’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Delaware:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “eCLE” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of eCLE per reporting period.

Florida:  All PLI products can fulfill Florida’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Georgia:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “in-house” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 in-house credits per reporting period.

Hawaii:  All PLI products can fulfill Hawaii’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Idaho:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Illinois:  All PLI products can fulfill Illinois' CLE requirements for experienced attorneys. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Indiana:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “distance education” credit. Attorneys are limited to 9 credits of distance education per reporting period.

Iowa:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Kansas:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Kentucky:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Louisiana:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 4 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Maine:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Minnesota:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Mississippi:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “distance learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of distance learning per reporting period.

Missouri:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Montana:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Nebraska:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “computer-based learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 5 credits of computer-based learning per reporting period.

Nevada:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

New Hampshire:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

New Jersey:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “alternative verifiable learning formats” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of alternative verifiable learning formats per reporting period.

New Mexico:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

New York

Experienced Attorneys:  All PLI products can fulfill New York’s CLE requirements for experienced attorneys. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Newly Admitted Attorneys:  PLI’s transitional live webcasts can be used to fulfill the requirements for New York newly admitted attorneys. Ethics credit, professional practice credit, and law practice management credit may be earned via transitional live webcasts. Skills credits may not be earned via live webcasts.

North Carolina:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

North Dakota:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Ohio:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Oklahoma:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Oregon:  All PLI products can fulfill Oregon’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Pennsylvania:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “distance learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of distance learning per reporting period.

Puerto Rico:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “non-traditional” credit. Attorneys are limited to 8 credits of non-traditional programs per reporting period.

Rhode Island:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

South Carolina:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “alternatively delivered” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of alternatively delivered programs per reporting period.

Tennessee:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “distance learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 8 credits of distance learning per reporting period.

Texas:  All PLI products can fulfill Texas’ CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Utah:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Vermont:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Virgin Islands:  All PLI products can fulfill the Virgin Islands’ CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Virginia:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live interactive” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live interactive programs.

Washington:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

West Virginia:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “online” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of online instruction per reporting period.

Wisconsin:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Wyoming:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

CPD Jurisdictions

British Columbia (CPD-BC):  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “real-time” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via real-time programs.

Ontario (CPD-ON):  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “interactive” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via interactive programs.

Quebec (CPD-QC):  PLI’s live webcasts can fulfill Quebec’s CPD requirements.

Hong Kong (CPD-HK):  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “distance learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 15 points of distance learning programs per reporting period.

United Kingdom (CPD-UK):  PLI’s live webcasts can fulfill the United Kingdom’s CPD requirements.

Australia (CPD-AUS):  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill Australia’s CPD requirements. Credit limits for live webcasts vary according to jurisdiction. Please refer to your jurisdiction’s CPD information page for specifics.

Other Credit Types

CPE Credit (NASBA):  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “Group-Internet-Based” (GIB) credit.

IRS Continuing Education (IRS-CE):  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill IRS-CE requirements. To request IRS-CE credit, please notify PLI at plicredits@pli.edu of your request and include your Preparer Tax Identification Number (PTIN).

Certified Fraud Examiner CPE:  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill Certified Fraud Examiner CPE requirements. To request CPE credit or find out which programs offer CPE, please contact PLI at plicredits@pli.edu.

IAPP Continuing Privacy Credit (CPE):  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill Privacy CPE credit requirements.

HR Recertification (HRCI):  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill HR credit requirements.

SHRM Recertification (SHRM):  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as "instructor-led" credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an SHRM professional can earn via instructor-led programs.

Compliance Certification Board (CCB):  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” training events. There is no limit to the number of credits a candidate or certification holder can earn via live programs.

Certified Anti-Money Laundering Specialists (CAMS):  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill CAMS credit requirements.

New York State Social Worker Continuing Education (SW CPE):  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill SW CPE credit requirements.

American Bankers Association Professional Certification (ABA):  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill ABA credit requirements.

 


Why You Should Attend
Though created by state and local governments, homeowner associations are not regulated by either entity once the developer turns control of the subdivision over to the homeowner board.  Nor does a single regulatory agency enforce the consumer rights of buyers who purchase association homes.  Enforcement of consumer rights – to the extent they even exist – is achieved almost solely through private action.

About 14 million Californians now live in the state’s 52,000 townhomes, co-ops, condos, and planned subdivisions managed by associations.  The majority are homeowners of modest means.  When disputes arise – over assessment collection, for example – the association corporation typically has an attorney, while the modest means homeowner does not.  Representing modest means homeowners in association disputes is a field with enormous demand but few practitioners.

What You Will Learn
This training will introduce the new practitioner to statutes governing consumer rights in three key areas: assessment collection, transparency in association financial operations, and election statutes (used not only to elect board directors, but to set certain assessments.)  The training will also benefit practitioners, who have represented homeowners in the past, but want to deepen their understanding of the complex statutes governing associations.  The goal of the training is to provide participants with tools for representing modest means homeowners.

Who Should Attend
Consumer protection and real estate attorneys interested in expanding their practice to include modest means homeowners; lawyers who would like to extend their practices into the growing field of homeowner association law; elder law attorneys, who want to learn how to assist senior clients with homeowner association issues, particularly foreclosure by the association; pro bono attorneys, legal services attorneys, self-help attorneys, limited scope representation attorneys, small claims advisors; lawyers who want to test their aptitude for association law by first expanding their practice into small claims assistance.1


1 Existing California law lets homeowners bring specific homeowner association disputes into small claims court.  However, given the complexity of the law, homeowners need guidance in preparing the pleadings correctly.


PLI Group Discounts

Groups of 4-14 from the same organization, all registering at the same time, for a PLI program scheduled for presentation at the same site, are entitled to receive a group discount. For further discount information, please contact membership@pli.edu or call (800) 260-4PLI.

PLI Can Arrange Group Viewing to Your Firm

Contact the Groupcasts Department via email at groupcasts@pli.edu for more details.

Cancellations

All cancellations received 3 business days prior to the program will be refunded 100%. If you do not cancel within the allotted time period, payment is due in full. You may substitute another individual to attend the program at any time.




9:00 Opening Remarks
Marjorie Murray

9:05 Consumer Rights in California Common Interest Developments: Transparency in Association Records

Policy and legal framework for discussion: quasi-governmental nature of common interest developments (CIDs); its hybrid legal framework and powers; fiscal reasons for the growth of California CIDs; owner demographics; lack of regulation of CIDs: enforcement of homeowner consumer rights through private action in the courts; the infrastructure of the association industry; hierarchy of governing documents.

The Homeowner’s Right to Transparency
The homeowner’s longstanding right to association records; the need for transparency; legislation (AB1098/2005) modeled on the Public Records Act; defines “records”, the process for retrieving them, permissible redactions and changes; resistance of the association industry to transparency; recourse for the homeowner through small claims court; relief that the court might order, including recovery of costs.  Recent cases brought by homeowners to county district attorneys and U.S. Attorneys.
Commissioner Dave Jones, Marjorie Murray



10:05 Limits on Assessment Collection and the Association’s Power to Foreclose
Types of assessments the association can levy; analyzing whether the assessment itself is valid; notice and disclosure issues; key actors in assessment collection; collection tools; statutory limits on the association’s power to set assessments; the homeowner’s right to challenge the association’s accounting of the debt; measuring assessment collection practices against state and federal Fair Debt Collection statutes and the Business and Professions Code.  Recent class actions, key California Appellate rulings, and a 2017 9th Circuit opinion on association assessment collection.
Justin T. Berger, Esq.

11:05 Networking Break

11:15 Fairness and Integrity in Association Elections

Role of elections in CIDs; events governed by election statutes; public elections and CID elections compared; potential defendants in an elections case; Election Operating Rules: formation and adoption; quorum issues and cumulative voting; ballots v. proxies; role of the Inspector of Elections; challenging election procedures and outcomes in small claims court; remedies the court might order; discussion of Wittenberg v Beachwalk HOA (2013) 217 Cal. App. 41 654.; Q&A with the expert faculty.
Eric M. Schiffer, Esq.

12:30 Adjourn



Chairperson(s)
Marjorie Murray ~ President, Center for California Homeowner Association Law
Speaker(s)
Justin T. Berger ~ Principal, Cotchett Pitre McCarthy, LLP
Commissioner Dave Jones ~ California Insurance Commissioner, former Chair of the California Assembly Judiciary Committee, California Department of Insurance
Eric M. Schiffer ~ Founder, Schiffer & Buus, LLC
Program Attorney(s)
Christina Thompson ~ Senior Pro Bono Program Attorney, Practising Law Institute

San Francisco Seminar Location

PLI California Center, 685 Market Street, San Francisco, California 94105. (800) 260-4754.

San Francisco Hotel Accommodations

Park Central Hotel, 50 Third Street, San Francisco, CA 94103. 415-974-6400. When calling, please mention PLI and SET#287179. In addition, you may book online at Park Central Hotel PLI.

Omni Hotel San Francisco, 500 California Street, San Francisco, CA 94104. 415-677-9494.  When calling, please mention Practising Law Institute.  You may also book online at PLI Omni Hotel 2017.

Due to high demand we recommend reserving hotel rooms as early as possible.

General credit information about this format appears below. For credit information specific to this program, please choose your jurisdiction(s) in the Credit Information box on the right-hand side of this page.


U.S. MCLE States

Alabama: PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Alaska:  All PLI products can fulfill Alaska’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Arizona:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “interactive CLE” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via interactive CLE programs.

Arkansas:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

California:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “participatory” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via participatory programs.

Colorado:  All PLI products can fulfill Colorado’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Connecticut: Effective January 1, 2017, all PLI products can fulfill Connecticut’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Delaware:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Florida:  All PLI products can fulfill Florida’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Georgia:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Hawaii:  All PLI products can fulfill Hawaii’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Idaho:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Illinois: All PLI products can fulfill Illinois' CLE requirements for experienced attorneys. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Indiana:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Iowa:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Kansas:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live programs.

Kentucky:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Louisiana:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Maine:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Minnesota:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Mississippi:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Missouri:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Montana:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Nebraska:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Nevada:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

New Hampshire:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

New Jersey:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

New Mexico:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

New York

Experienced Attorneys:  All PLI products can fulfill New York’s CLE requirements for experienced attorneys. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Newly Admitted Attorneys:  PLI’s transitional live seminars can be used to fulfill the requirements for newly admitted attorneys. All credit categories may be earned via transitional live seminars.

North Carolina:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars

North Dakota:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Ohio:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Oklahoma:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Oregon:  All PLI products can fulfill Oregon’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Pennsylvania: PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Puerto Rico:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Rhode Island:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

South Carolina:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Tennessee:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Texas:  All PLI products can fulfill Texas’ CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Utah:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Vermont:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Virgin Islands:  All PLI products can fulfill the Virgin Islands’ CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Virginia:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live interactive” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live interactive programs.

Washington:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

West Virginia:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Wisconsin:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Wyoming:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

CPD Jurisdictions

British Columbia (CPD-BC):  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “real-time” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via real-time programs.

Ontario (CPD-ON):  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “interactive” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via interactive programs.

Quebec (CPD-QC): PLI’s live seminars can fulfill Quebec’s CPD requirements.

Hong Kong (CPD-HK):  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of points an attorney can earn via live seminars.

United Kingdom (CPD-UK):  PLI’s live seminars can fulfill the United Kingdom’s CPD requirements.

Australia (CPD-AUS):  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit in all Australian jurisdictions. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Other Credit Types

CPE Credit (NASBA): PLI’s live seminars qualify as “Group-Live delivery” credit.

IRS Continuing Education (IRS-CE): PLI’s live seminars may fulfill IRS-CE requirements. To request IRS-CE credit, please notify PLI at plicredits@pli.edu of your request and include your Preparer Tax Identification Number (PTIN).

Certified Fraud Examiner CPE:  PLI’s live seminars may fulfill Certified Fraud Examiner CPE requirements. To request CPE credit or find out which programs offer CPE, please contact PLI at plicredits@pli.edu.

IAPP Continuing Privacy Credit (CPE):  PLI’s live seminars may fulfill Privacy CPE credit requirements.

HR Recertification (HRCI):  PLI’s live seminars may fulfill HR credit requirements.

SHRM Recertification (SHRM):  PLI’s live seminars qualify as "instructor-led" credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an SHRM professional can earn via instructor-led programs.

Compliance Certification Board (CCB):  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” training events. There is no limit to the number of credits a candidate or certification holder can earn via live programs.

Certified Anti-Money Laundering Specialists (CAMS):  PLI’s live seminars may fulfill CAMS credit requirements.

New York State Social Worker Continuing Education (SW CPE):  PLI’s live seminars may fulfill SW CPE credit requirements.

American Bankers Association Professional Certification (ABA):  PLI’s live seminars may fulfill ABA credit requirements.

 

Share
Email

  • FOLLOW PLI:
  • twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • GooglePlus
  • RSS

All Contents Copyright © 1996-2017 Practising Law Institute. Continuing Legal Education since 1933.

© 2017 PLI PRACTISING LAW INSTITUTE. All rights reserved. The PLI logo is a service mark of PLI.