Seminar  Program

Ethical Issues in California Pro Bono Representation 2018 (Free)


Select a Location:

Why You Should Attend
While the ethical obligations of pro bono legal practice are no different than a commercial law practice, there are practical considerations regarding eligibility of clients, challenging clients, conflicts (similar in theory, different in practice settings), expectations on both sides, case management responsibility, and different delivery models, such as limited scope representation, that cause many professionals to hesitate to offer pro bono legal services. This program is designed to answer questions regarding the ethical obligations of pro bono legal service, encourage attorneys to engage in this professionally rewarding aspect of law practice, and remove ambiguities that are barriers to engaging in pro bono legal services.

What You Will Learn
Attorneys knowledgeable about  professional responsibility and pro bono service, who work in legal services, law firms, private bar programs and in-house corporate law departments will discuss the application of the California Rules of Professional Conduct, the ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct, and, where relevant, the Proposed California Rules of Professional Conduct to pro bono legal service in different settings. The faculty will begin with the basics of pro bono, including the definition of “Pro Bono” for lawyers, why it is considered an important part of the profession, and ethical concerns unique to pro bono, as opposed to the commercial practice of law.

The faculty will also address emerging ethical issues in developing areas, such as pro bono clinics, incubators, pro bono in Federal courts, and the impact of technology in pro bono legal services.

Finally, the faculty will discuss hypothetical fact patterns to illustrate the application of the rules.

Who Should Attend
Law firm pro bono coordinators, partners, and associates, legal services pro bono coordinators and staff, in-house corporate pro bono managers and counsels, solos, small and medium firm attorneys engaged in pro bono legal services, court-based program administrators for self-represented litigants, judges, and everyone interested in access to justice.


PLI Group Discounts

Groups of 4-14 from the same organization, all registering at the same time, for a PLI program scheduled for presentation at the same site, are entitled to receive a group discount. For further discount information, please contact membership@pli.edu or call (800) 260-4PLI.

PLI Can Arrange Group Viewing to Your Firm

Contact the Groupcasts Department via email at groupcasts@pli.edu for more details.

Cancellations

All cancellations received 3 business days prior to the program will be refunded 100%. If you do not cancel within the allotted time period, payment is due in full. You may substitute another individual to attend the program at any time.

9:00 Opening Remarks
Tiela Chalmers

9:15 Pro Bono Rules; Commencing and Conducting the Representation
I. Pro Bono Rules
 A. Pro Bono Service
  • What Qualifies as “Real” Pro Bono
  • The Need
  • History/Background
  • Duty
  • Basic Principles of Pro Bono Representation
 B. Commencing the Representation
  • Be Admitted: Unauthorized Practice
  • Attorneys Admitted in Other States
  • Pro Bono as a Loss Leader for Future Pecuniary Gain
  • Selecting and Vetting the “Right” Pro Bono Clients
 C. Checking for Conflicts of Interest
  • Conflicts Between Clients
  • Conflicts Between Attorney and Client
  • Conflict Imputation and Screening
  • Conflict Waivers
  • Conflicts in Clinics
 D. Defining the Scope of Representation
  • Full Scope, Limited Scope, Self-Help
  • Rules for Limited Scope Representation
 E.Documenting the Representation
  • Written Retainer Agreement
  • Plain Language
  • Dealing with Law Firm Standard Letters
  • Language Issues
  • Non-representation Letter
II. Conducting the Representation
 A. The four C’s
  • Conflicts
  • Competence
   • Options if you Have No Experience in this Area of Law
  •Confidentiality
   • Differentiate from Attorney-Client Privilege
   • Potential Clients
   • Who is the Client?
   • Communicating with Pro Bono Provider or Mentor
   • Consequences of Breach of Confidentiality
   • Physical and Electronic Files
   • Email and Online Document Storage
   • Cocktail Parties and their 21st Century Counterpart, Social Media
  • Communication
   • Keeping Client Informed
   • Settlement Offers
   • Avoiding Avoidance
  • Other Basic Rules
   • Safekeeping Property
   • No Frivolous Actions
   • No Sex with Clients
 B. Professionalism and Cultural Competence
  • Don’t Be a Jerk
  • Reasons Why Pro Bono Clients May Make Different Decisions Than You Would
  • Different Family and Cultural Values and the Role of the Attorney
   • Time and Outcome Tracking
 C. Ending the Representation
  •Disengagement Letter
  •Client Right to Files
  • Reporting to Pro Bono Provider
 D. Problems That Can Arise
  • Losing Track of the Client
  • What to Do if you Have Questions, or Feel Out of Your Depth
  • Confidentiality, Death and Imminent Bodily Injury Exception
  • Client With Diminished Capacity
 E. Emerging Issues
  • Incubator Programs
  • Working with Non-Lawyer Volunteers and Interpreters
Tiela Chalmers, Renee Glover Chantler, Toby J. Rothschild, Christopher M. Tirrell, Jonathan McNeil Wong, Phong S. Wong

11:15 Networking Break

11:30 Specific Application of Ethical Rules and Issues to Various Pro Bono Practice Settings – Hypotheticals
• Challenging Attorneys/Clients
• Pro Bono Attorney Engagement and Disengagement
• Brief Advice Clinics
  • Self-Help
  • Limited Scope 
• Pro Bono Volunteer Communication
  • Clients
  • Legal Services Organizations
• Reporting Outcomes
• Attorney as Officer of the Court
Tiela Chalmers, Renee Glover Chantler, Toby J. Rothschild, Christopher M. Tirrell, Jonathan McNeil Wong, Phong S. Wong

12:30 Adjourn

Chairperson(s)
Tiela Chalmers ~ Chief Executive Officer and General Counsel, Alameda County Bar Association and Volunteer Legal Services Corporation
Speaker(s)
Renee Glover Chantler ~ Principal, Chantler Law Offices
Toby J. Rothschild ~ Of Counsel, OneJustice
Christopher M. Tirrell ~ Associate Commercial Counsel for X, Google
Jonathan McNeil Wong ~ Partner, Donahue Fitzgerald LLP
Phong S. Wong ~ Pro Bono Director, Legal Aid Foundation of Los Angeles
Program Attorney(s)
Christina Thompson ~ Senior Pro Bono Program Attorney, Practising Law Institute
General credit information about this format appears below. For credit information specific to this program, please choose your jurisdiction(s) in the Credit Information box on the right-hand side of this page.

PLI’s live and on-demand webcasts are single-user license products intended for an individual registrant only. Credit will be issued only to the individual registered. If two or more individuals wish to participate in a webcast and receive credit, PLI would be happy to provide a Groupcast – group viewing of a webcast. To schedule a Groupcast, please contact PLI at groupcasts@pli.edu.


U.S. MCLE States

Alabama:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Alaska:  All PLI products can fulfill Alaska’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Arizona:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “interactive CLE” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via interactive CLE programs.

Arkansas:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

California:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “participatory” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via participatory programs.

Colorado:  All PLI products can fulfill Colorado’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Connecticut: Effective January 1, 2017, all PLI products can fulfill Connecticut’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Delaware:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “eCLE” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of eCLE per reporting period.

Florida:  All PLI products can fulfill Florida’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Georgia:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “in-house” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 in-house credits per reporting period.

Hawaii:  All PLI products can fulfill Hawaii’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Idaho:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Illinois:  All PLI products can fulfill Illinois' CLE requirements for experienced attorneys. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Indiana:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “distance education” credit. Attorneys are limited to 9 credits of distance education per reporting period.

Iowa:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Kansas:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Kentucky:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Louisiana:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 4 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Maine:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Minnesota:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Mississippi:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “distance learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of distance learning per reporting period.

Missouri:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Montana:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Nebraska:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “computer-based learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 5 credits of computer-based learning per reporting period.

Nevada:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

New Hampshire:  All PLI products can fulfill New Hampshire’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

New Jersey:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “alternative verifiable learning formats” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of alternative verifiable learning formats per reporting period.

New Mexico:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

New York

Experienced Attorneys:  All PLI products can fulfill New York’s CLE requirements for experienced attorneys. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Newly Admitted Attorneys:  PLI’s transitional live webcasts can be used to fulfill the requirements for New York newly admitted attorneys. Ethics credit, professional practice credit, and law practice management credit may be earned via transitional live webcasts. Skills credits may not be earned via live webcasts.

North Carolina:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

North Dakota:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Ohio:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Oklahoma:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Oregon:  All PLI products can fulfill Oregon’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Pennsylvania:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “distance learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of distance learning per reporting period.

Puerto Rico:  All PLI products can fulfill Puerto Rico’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Rhode Island:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

South Carolina:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “alternatively delivered” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of alternatively delivered programs per reporting period.

Tennessee:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “distance learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 8 credits of distance learning per reporting period.

Texas:  All PLI products can fulfill Texas’ CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Utah:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Vermont:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Virgin Islands:  All PLI products can fulfill the Virgin Islands’ CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Virginia:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live interactive” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live interactive programs.

Washington:  All PLI products can fulfill Washington’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

West Virginia:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “online” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of online instruction per reporting period.

Wisconsin:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Wyoming:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

CPD Jurisdictions

British Columbia (CPD-BC):  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “real-time” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via real-time programs.

Ontario (CPD-ON):  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “interactive” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via interactive programs.

Quebec (CPD-QC):  PLI’s live webcasts can fulfill Quebec’s CPD requirements.

Hong Kong (CPD-HK):  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “distance learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 15 points of distance learning programs per reporting period.

United Kingdom (CPD-UK):  PLI’s live webcasts can fulfill the United Kingdom’s CPD requirements.

Australia (CPD-AUS):  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill Australia’s CPD requirements. Credit limits for live webcasts vary according to jurisdiction. Please refer to your jurisdiction’s CPD information page for specifics.

Alberta (CPD-ALBERTA):  All PLI products can fulfill Alberta’s CPD requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Dubai (CLPD-DUBAI):  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill CLPD credit requirements.

Other Credit Types

CPE Credit (NASBA):  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as the “Group-Internet-Based” (GIB) delivery method. Please check the Credit Information box on the right-hand side of this page to verify CPE credit availability.

IRS Continuing Education (IRS-CE):  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill IRS-CE requirements. To request IRS-CE credit, please notify PLI at plicredits@pli.edu of your request and include your Preparer Tax Identification Number (PTIN).

Certified Fraud Examiner CPE:  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill Certified Fraud Examiner CPE requirements. To request CPE credit or find out which programs offer CPE, please contact PLI at plicredits@pli.edu.

IAPP Continuing Privacy Credit (CPE):  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill Privacy CPE credit requirements.

HR Recertification (HRCI):  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill HR credit requirements.

SHRM Recertification (SHRM):  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as "instructor-led" credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an SHRM professional can earn via instructor-led programs.

Compliance Certification Board (CCB):  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” training events. There is no limit to the number of credits a candidate or certification holder can earn via live programs.

Certified Anti-Money Laundering Specialists (CAMS):  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill CAMS credit requirements.

New York State Social Worker Continuing Education (SW CPE):  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill SW CPE credit requirements.

American Bankers Association Professional Certification (ABA):  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill ABA credit requirements.

Certified Financial Planners (CFP):  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill CFP credit requirements.

 

Why You Should Attend
While the ethical obligations of pro bono legal practice are no different than a commercial law practice, there are practical considerations regarding eligibility of clients, challenging clients, conflicts (similar in theory, different in practice settings), expectations on both sides, case management responsibility, and different delivery models, such as limited scope representation, that cause many professionals to hesitate to offer pro bono legal services. This program is designed to answer questions regarding the ethical obligations of pro bono legal service, encourage attorneys to engage in this professionally rewarding aspect of law practice, and remove ambiguities that are barriers to engaging in pro bono legal services.

What You Will Learn
Attorneys knowledgeable about  professional responsibility and pro bono service, who work in legal services, law firms, private bar programs and in-house corporate law departments will discuss the application of the California Rules of Professional Conduct, the ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct, and, where relevant, the Proposed California Rules of Professional Conduct to pro bono legal service in different settings. The faculty will begin with the basics of pro bono, including the definition of “Pro Bono” for lawyers, why it is considered an important part of the profession, and ethical concerns unique to pro bono, as opposed to the commercial practice of law.

The faculty will also address emerging ethical issues in developing areas, such as pro bono clinics, incubators, pro bono in Federal courts, and the impact of technology in pro bono legal services.

Finally, the faculty will discuss hypothetical fact patterns to illustrate the application of the rules.

Who Should Attend
Law firm pro bono coordinators, partners, and associates, legal services pro bono coordinators and staff, in-house corporate pro bono managers and counsels, solos, small and medium firm attorneys engaged in pro bono legal services, court-based program administrators for self-represented litigants, judges, and everyone interested in access to justice.


PLI Group Discounts

Groups of 4-14 from the same organization, all registering at the same time, for a PLI program scheduled for presentation at the same site, are entitled to receive a group discount. For further discount information, please contact membership@pli.edu or call (800) 260-4PLI.

PLI Can Arrange Group Viewing to Your Firm

Contact the Groupcasts Department via email at groupcasts@pli.edu for more details.

Cancellations

All cancellations received 3 business days prior to the program will be refunded 100%. If you do not cancel within the allotted time period, payment is due in full. You may substitute another individual to attend the program at any time.

9:00 Opening Remarks
Tiela Chalmers

9:15 Pro Bono Rules; Commencing and Conducting the Representation
I. Pro Bono Rules
 A. Pro Bono Service
  • What Qualifies as “Real” Pro Bono
  • The Need
  • History/Background
  • Duty
  • Basic Principles of Pro Bono Representation
 B. Commencing the Representation
  • Be Admitted: Unauthorized Practice
  • Attorneys Admitted in Other States
  • Pro Bono as a Loss Leader for Future Pecuniary Gain
  • Selecting and Vetting the “Right” Pro Bono Clients
 C. Checking for Conflicts of Interest
  • Conflicts Between Clients
  • Conflicts Between Attorney and Client
  • Conflict Imputation and Screening
  • Conflict Waivers
  • Conflicts in Clinics
 D. Defining the Scope of Representation
  • Full Scope, Limited Scope, Self-Help
  • Rules for Limited Scope Representation
 E.Documenting the Representation
  • Written Retainer Agreement
  • Plain Language
  • Dealing with Law Firm Standard Letters
  • Language Issues
  • Non-representation Letter
II. Conducting the Representation
 A. The four C’s
  • Conflicts
  • Competence
   • Options if you Have No Experience in this Area of Law
  •Confidentiality
   • Differentiate from Attorney-Client Privilege
   • Potential Clients
   • Who is the Client?
   • Communicating with Pro Bono Provider or Mentor
   • Consequences of Breach of Confidentiality
   • Physical and Electronic Files
   • Email and Online Document Storage
   • Cocktail Parties and their 21st Century Counterpart, Social Media
  • Communication
   • Keeping Client Informed
   • Settlement Offers
   • Avoiding Avoidance
  • Other Basic Rules
   • Safekeeping Property
   • No Frivolous Actions
   • No Sex with Clients
 B. Professionalism and Cultural Competence
  • Don’t Be a Jerk
  • Reasons Why Pro Bono Clients May Make Different Decisions Than You Would
  • Different Family and Cultural Values and the Role of the Attorney
   • Time and Outcome Tracking
 C. Ending the Representation
  •Disengagement Letter
  •Client Right to Files
  • Reporting to Pro Bono Provider
 D. Problems That Can Arise
  • Losing Track of the Client
  • What to Do if you Have Questions, or Feel Out of Your Depth
  • Confidentiality, Death and Imminent Bodily Injury Exception
  • Client With Diminished Capacity
 E. Emerging Issues
  • Incubator Programs
  • Working with Non-Lawyer Volunteers and Interpreters
Tiela Chalmers, Renee Glover Chantler, Toby J. Rothschild, Christopher M. Tirrell, Jonathan McNeil Wong, Phong S. Wong

11:15 Networking Break

11:30 Specific Application of Ethical Rules and Issues to Various Pro Bono Practice Settings – Hypotheticals
• Challenging Attorneys/Clients
• Pro Bono Attorney Engagement and Disengagement
• Brief Advice Clinics
  • Self-Help
  • Limited Scope 
• Pro Bono Volunteer Communication
  • Clients
  • Legal Services Organizations
• Reporting Outcomes
• Attorney as Officer of the Court
Tiela Chalmers, Renee Glover Chantler, Toby J. Rothschild, Christopher M. Tirrell, Jonathan McNeil Wong, Phong S. Wong

12:30 Adjourn

Chairperson(s)
Tiela Chalmers ~ Chief Executive Officer and General Counsel, Alameda County Bar Association and Volunteer Legal Services Corporation
Speaker(s)
Renee Glover Chantler ~ Principal, Chantler Law Offices
Toby J. Rothschild ~ Of Counsel, OneJustice
Christopher M. Tirrell ~ Associate Commercial Counsel for X, Google
Jonathan McNeil Wong ~ Partner, Donahue Fitzgerald LLP
Phong S. Wong ~ Pro Bono Director, Legal Aid Foundation of Los Angeles
Program Attorney(s)
Christina Thompson ~ Senior Pro Bono Program Attorney, Practising Law Institute

San Francisco Seminar Location

PLI California Center, 685 Market Street, San Francisco, California 94105. (800) 260-4754.

San Francisco Hotel Accommodations

Park Central Hotel, 50 Third Street, San Francisco, CA 94103. 415-974-6400. When calling, please mention PLI and SET#287179. In addition, you may book online at Park Central Hotel PLI.

Omni Hotel San Francisco, 500 California Street, San Francisco, CA 94104. 415-677-9494.  When calling, please mention Practising Law Institute.  You may also book online at PLI Omni 2018.

Due to high demand we recommend reserving hotel rooms as early as possible.

General credit information about this format appears below. For credit information specific to this program, please choose your jurisdiction(s) in the Credit Information box on the right-hand side of this page.


U.S. MCLE States

Alabama: PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Alaska:  All PLI products can fulfill Alaska’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Arizona:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “interactive CLE” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via interactive CLE programs.

Arkansas:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

California:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “participatory” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via participatory programs.

Colorado:  All PLI products can fulfill Colorado’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Connecticut: Effective January 1, 2017, all PLI products can fulfill Connecticut’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Delaware:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Florida:  All PLI products can fulfill Florida’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Georgia:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Hawaii:  All PLI products can fulfill Hawaii’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Idaho:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Illinois: All PLI products can fulfill Illinois' CLE requirements for experienced attorneys. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Indiana:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Iowa:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Kansas:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live programs.

Kentucky:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Louisiana:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Maine:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Minnesota:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Mississippi:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Missouri:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Montana:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Nebraska:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Nevada:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

New Hampshire:  All PLI products can fulfill New Hampshire’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

New Jersey:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

New Mexico:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

New York

Experienced Attorneys:  All PLI products can fulfill New York’s CLE requirements for experienced attorneys. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Newly Admitted Attorneys:  PLI’s transitional live seminars can be used to fulfill the requirements for newly admitted attorneys. All credit categories may be earned via transitional live seminars.

North Carolina:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars

North Dakota:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Ohio:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Oklahoma:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Oregon:  All PLI products can fulfill Oregon’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Pennsylvania: PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Puerto Rico:  All PLI products can fulfill Puerto Rico’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Rhode Island:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

South Carolina:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Tennessee:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Texas:  All PLI products can fulfill Texas’ CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Utah:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Vermont:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Virgin Islands:  All PLI products can fulfill the Virgin Islands’ CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Virginia:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live interactive” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live interactive programs.

Washington:  All PLI products can fulfill Washington’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

West Virginia:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Wisconsin:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Wyoming:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

CPD Jurisdictions

British Columbia (CPD-BC):  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “real-time” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via real-time programs.

Ontario (CPD-ON):  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “interactive” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via interactive programs.

Quebec (CPD-QC): PLI’s live seminars can fulfill Quebec’s CPD requirements.

Hong Kong (CPD-HK):  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of points an attorney can earn via live seminars.

United Kingdom (CPD-UK):  PLI’s live seminars can fulfill the United Kingdom’s CPD requirements.

Australia (CPD-AUS):  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit in all Australian jurisdictions. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Alberta (CPD-ALBERTA):  All PLI products can fulfill Alberta’s CPD requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Dubai (CLPD-DUBAI):  PLI’s live seminars may fulfill CLPD credit requirements.

Other Credit Types

CPE Credit (NASBA): PLI’s live seminars qualify as the “Group-Live” delivery method. Please check the Credit Information box on the right-hand side of this page to verify CPE credit availability.

IRS Continuing Education (IRS-CE): PLI’s live seminars may fulfill IRS-CE requirements. To request IRS-CE credit, please notify PLI at plicredits@pli.edu of your request and include your Preparer Tax Identification Number (PTIN).

Certified Fraud Examiner CPE:  PLI’s live seminars may fulfill Certified Fraud Examiner CPE requirements. To request CPE credit or find out which programs offer CPE, please contact PLI at plicredits@pli.edu.

IAPP Continuing Privacy Credit (CPE):  PLI’s live seminars may fulfill Privacy CPE credit requirements.

HR Recertification (HRCI):  PLI’s live seminars may fulfill HR credit requirements.

SHRM Recertification (SHRM):  PLI’s live seminars qualify as "instructor-led" credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an SHRM professional can earn via instructor-led programs.

Compliance Certification Board (CCB):  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” training events. There is no limit to the number of credits a candidate or certification holder can earn via live programs.

Certified Anti-Money Laundering Specialists (CAMS):  PLI’s live seminars may fulfill CAMS credit requirements.

New York State Social Worker Continuing Education (SW CPE):  PLI’s live seminars may fulfill SW CPE credit requirements.

American Bankers Association Professional Certification (ABA):  PLI’s live seminars may fulfill ABA credit requirements.

Certified Financial Planners (CFP):  PLI’s live seminars may fulfill CFP credit requirements.

 

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  Law Offices of Sunanda Pandey

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   Intel Corporation

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  Member, New Mexico State Bar


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