Seminar  Program

California Eviction Defense 2.0: Beyond the Basics of Protecting Low-Income Tenants 2018 (Free)


Select a Location:

Why You Should Attend
“It is hard to argue that housing is not a fundamental human need. Decent, affordable housing should be a basic right for everybody in this country. The reason is simple: without stable shelter, everything else falls apart.” (Matthew Desmond, Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City.) In California, where the cost of housing is on the rise every year, more and more low-income families are rent-burdened to the point that they are at high risk of eviction. For those who are evicted, finding other stable and affordable housing becomes increasingly difficult, and the risk of homelessness looms. Even if they are lucky enough to find new housing, evicted tenants’ lives are often disrupted and altered in myriad ways: they are displaced from their communities, jobs, health care, and places of worship; they are driven into debt by moving costs and higher rents; their children lose time in school

In this context, protecting low-income tenants from evictions is increasingly critical. Attorneys who have a basic understanding of California eviction defense and housing law can advance justice for low-income tenants and prevent harm from unnecessary displacement. Housing advocates and more local governments around the state recognize that representing tenants makes a difference in tenants’ lives. 

This training is designed to help mitigate California’s housing affordability crisis by providing attorneys with an understanding of key procedural issues in eviction defense and protecting tenants’ rights.  Participants will have an opportunity to connect with non-profit legal service agencies able to facilitate pro bono representation of low-income families facing this predicament.

What You Will Learn
  • Civil procedure tools in the accelerated unlawful detainer context;
  • When and how to use pre-Answer motions to protect tenants;
  • Tips for conducting discovery for maximum effect;
  • How to best utilize affirmative defenses and when to consider affirmative lawsuits;
  • Best practices for drafting settlement agreements to protect tenants;
  • Tenant rights to jury trial and tools to consider in your trial strategy;
  • When and how to file a post-trial motion or appeal.
  • Who Should Attend
    Practitioners who handle or are interested in handling eviction defense matters should attend.  The training will prove helpful for new attorneys and for those with experience who want to deepen their use of California procedure and explore new tools to include in their practice.  The sessions will touch on avenues for affirmative litigation to protect low-income tenancies.


    PLI Group Discounts

    Groups of 4-14 from the same organization, all registering at the same time, for a PLI program scheduled for presentation at the same site, are entitled to receive a group discount. For further discount information, please contact membership@pli.edu or call (800) 260-4PLI.

    PLI Can Arrange Group Viewing to Your Firm

    Contact the Groupcasts Department via email at groupcasts@pli.edu for more details.

    Cancellations

    All cancellations received 3 business days prior to the program will be refunded 100%. If you do not cancel within the allotted time period, payment is due in full. You may substitute another individual to attend the program at any time.

    9:00 Opening Remarks
    Lorraine López, Alex Prieto

    9:15 Pre-Answer Motions: Demurrers, Motions to Strike, Motions to Quash
    Interviewing tenants who are facing eviction, common questions come up such as: Was the tenant served?  Does the unlawful detainer complaint contain necessary allegations?  Is the complaint clear?  This panel will address when to consider filing a motion instead of an Answer, what motions may be filed, timing considerations, and what to expect.
    Oliver Ehlinger, Lisa Greif

    10:15 Formal & Informal Discovery in Unlawful Detainers
    Attorneys who represent low-income tenants may gain rapid experience with discovery tools to develop evidence in the case and prepare for trial and settlement discussions.  Key issues to be addressed by this panel include form and special interrogatories, depositions, document demands, when to serve discovery, and how to get documents from government entities and other third parties.
    Ubaldo Fernandez, Leah F. Simon-Weisberg

    11:15 Networking Break

    11:30 Habitability, Retaliation, SLAPP, & Other Considerations
    Tenants with substantive defenses nevertheless face challenges enforcing the law. When should tenants invoke affirmative defenses?  What special statutes apply?  When may attorney fees be awarded?  When should an affirmative suit be considered? This panel will address substantive rights of tenants facing eviction.
    Denise McGranahan, Deepika Sharma

    12:30 Lunch

    1:30 Writing Effective Settlements
    How an unlawful detainer case resolves may have a lasting impact on a low-income tenant’s future ability to find housing.  What key language should be included in settlement agreements?  What are the options for the form of a settlement agreement?  When should tenants elect to go to jury trial?  This panel will address these and other considerations in bringing the unlawful detainer case to resolution.
    Erin Katayama, Shirley Gibson

    2:30 Networking Break

    2:45 Trials & Writs
    This session discuss preparation for trial, strategic considerations for determining when requesting a jury trial will benefit your client, preparation for trial, evidentiary issues and how to incorporate writs into your defense strategy.
    Lorraine López, Alex Prieto

    3:45 Appeals & Post-Trial Motions
    Unlawful detainers are summary proceedings, and both represented and unrepresented tenants may not get the result they desire at trial.  When should a motion for reconsideration or new trial be filed?  When should an appeal be considered?  This panel will address key considerations and procedures in post-trial motions and appeals.
    Christian Abasto, Richard Walker

    4:45 Adjourn



    Co-Chair(s)
    Lorraine López ~ Inner City Law Center
    Alex Prieto ~ Senior Litigator, Western Center on Law and Poverty
    Speaker(s)
    Christian Abasto ~ Managing Attorney, Disability Rights California
    Oliver Ehlinger ~ Managing Attorney, Legal Services of Northern California
    Ubaldo Fernandez ~ Staff Attorney/Clinical Supervisor, Housing Practice, East Bay Community Law Center
    Shirley Gibson ~ Directing Attorney, Home Savers Project, Legal Aid Society of San Mateo County
    Lisa Greif ~ Staff Attorney, Bay Area Legal Aid
    Erin Katayama ~ Supervising Attorney, Homeless Advocacy Project, Justice & Diversity Center of The Bar Association of San Francisco
    Denise McGranahan ~ Senior Attorney, Legal Aid Foundation of Los Angeles
    Deepika Sharma ~ Staff Attorney, Public Counsel
    Leah F. Simon-Weisberg ~ Managing Attorney, Centro Legal de la Raza
    Richard Walker ~ Staff Attorney, Public Law Center
    Program Attorney(s)
    Christina Thompson ~ Senior Pro Bono Program Attorney, Practising Law Institute
    General credit information about this format appears below. For credit information specific to this program, please choose your jurisdiction(s) in the Credit Information box on the right-hand side of this page.

    PLI’s live and on-demand webcasts are single-user license products intended for an individual registrant only. Credit will be issued only to the individual registered. If two or more individuals wish to participate in a webcast and receive credit, PLI would be happy to provide a Groupcast – group viewing of a webcast. To schedule a Groupcast, please contact PLI at groupcasts@pli.edu.


    U.S. MCLE States

    Alabama:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

    Alaska:  All PLI products can fulfill Alaska’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

    Arizona:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “interactive CLE” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via interactive CLE programs.

    Arkansas:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

    California:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “participatory” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via participatory programs.

    Colorado:  All PLI products can fulfill Colorado’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

    Connecticut: Effective January 1, 2017, all PLI products can fulfill Connecticut’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

    Delaware:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “eCLE” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of eCLE per reporting period.

    Florida:  All PLI products can fulfill Florida’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

    Georgia:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “in-house” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 in-house credits per reporting period.

    Hawaii:  All PLI products can fulfill Hawaii’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

    Idaho:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

    Illinois:  All PLI products can fulfill Illinois' CLE requirements for experienced attorneys. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

    Indiana:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “distance education” credit. Attorneys are limited to 9 credits of distance education per reporting period.

    Iowa:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

    Kansas:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

    Kentucky:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

    Louisiana:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 4 credits of self-study per reporting period.

    Maine:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

    Minnesota:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

    Mississippi:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “distance learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of distance learning per reporting period.

    Missouri:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

    Montana:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

    Nebraska:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “computer-based learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 5 credits of computer-based learning per reporting period.

    Nevada:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

    New Hampshire:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

    New Jersey:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “alternative verifiable learning formats” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of alternative verifiable learning formats per reporting period.

    New Mexico:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

    New York

    Experienced Attorneys:  All PLI products can fulfill New York’s CLE requirements for experienced attorneys. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

    Newly Admitted Attorneys:  PLI’s transitional live webcasts can be used to fulfill the requirements for New York newly admitted attorneys. Ethics credit, professional practice credit, and law practice management credit may be earned via transitional live webcasts. Skills credits may not be earned via live webcasts.

    North Carolina:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

    North Dakota:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

    Ohio:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of self-study per reporting period.

    Oklahoma:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

    Oregon:  All PLI products can fulfill Oregon’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

    Pennsylvania:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “distance learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of distance learning per reporting period.

    Puerto Rico:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “non-traditional” credit. Attorneys are limited to 8 credits of non-traditional programs per reporting period.

    Rhode Island:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

    South Carolina:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “alternatively delivered” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of alternatively delivered programs per reporting period.

    Tennessee:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “distance learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 8 credits of distance learning per reporting period.

    Texas:  All PLI products can fulfill Texas’ CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

    Utah:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of self-study per reporting period.

    Vermont:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

    Virgin Islands:  All PLI products can fulfill the Virgin Islands’ CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

    Virginia:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live interactive” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live interactive programs.

    Washington:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

    West Virginia:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “online” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of online instruction per reporting period.

    Wisconsin:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

    Wyoming:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

    CPD Jurisdictions

    British Columbia (CPD-BC):  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “real-time” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via real-time programs.

    Ontario (CPD-ON):  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “interactive” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via interactive programs.

    Quebec (CPD-QC):  PLI’s live webcasts can fulfill Quebec’s CPD requirements.

    Hong Kong (CPD-HK):  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “distance learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 15 points of distance learning programs per reporting period.

    United Kingdom (CPD-UK):  PLI’s live webcasts can fulfill the United Kingdom’s CPD requirements.

    Australia (CPD-AUS):  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill Australia’s CPD requirements. Credit limits for live webcasts vary according to jurisdiction. Please refer to your jurisdiction’s CPD information page for specifics.

    Other Credit Types

    CPE Credit (NASBA):  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “Group-Internet-Based” (GIB) credit.

    IRS Continuing Education (IRS-CE):  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill IRS-CE requirements. To request IRS-CE credit, please notify PLI at plicredits@pli.edu of your request and include your Preparer Tax Identification Number (PTIN).

    Certified Fraud Examiner CPE:  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill Certified Fraud Examiner CPE requirements. To request CPE credit or find out which programs offer CPE, please contact PLI at plicredits@pli.edu.

    IAPP Continuing Privacy Credit (CPE):  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill Privacy CPE credit requirements.

    HR Recertification (HRCI):  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill HR credit requirements.

    SHRM Recertification (SHRM):  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as "instructor-led" credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an SHRM professional can earn via instructor-led programs.

    Compliance Certification Board (CCB):  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” training events. There is no limit to the number of credits a candidate or certification holder can earn via live programs.

    Certified Anti-Money Laundering Specialists (CAMS):  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill CAMS credit requirements.

    New York State Social Worker Continuing Education (SW CPE):  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill SW CPE credit requirements.

    American Bankers Association Professional Certification (ABA):  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill ABA credit requirements.

     

    Why You Should Attend
    “It is hard to argue that housing is not a fundamental human need. Decent, affordable housing should be a basic right for everybody in this country. The reason is simple: without stable shelter, everything else falls apart.” (Matthew Desmond, Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City.) In California, where the cost of housing is on the rise every year, more and more low-income families are rent-burdened to the point that they are at high risk of eviction. For those who are evicted, finding other stable and affordable housing becomes increasingly difficult, and the risk of homelessness looms. Even if they are lucky enough to find new housing, evicted tenants’ lives are often disrupted and altered in myriad ways: they are displaced from their communities, jobs, health care, and places of worship; they are driven into debt by moving costs and higher rents; their children lose time in school

    In this context, protecting low-income tenants from evictions is increasingly critical. Attorneys who have a basic understanding of California eviction defense and housing law can advance justice for low-income tenants and prevent harm from unnecessary displacement. Housing advocates and more local governments around the state recognize that representing tenants makes a difference in tenants’ lives. 

    This training is designed to help mitigate California’s housing affordability crisis by providing attorneys with an understanding of key procedural issues in eviction defense and protecting tenants’ rights.  Participants will have an opportunity to connect with non-profit legal service agencies able to facilitate pro bono representation of low-income families facing this predicament.

    What You Will Learn
  • Civil procedure tools in the accelerated unlawful detainer context;
  • When and how to use pre-Answer motions to protect tenants;
  • Tips for conducting discovery for maximum effect;
  • How to best utilize affirmative defenses and when to consider affirmative lawsuits;
  • Best practices for drafting settlement agreements to protect tenants;
  • Tenant rights to jury trial and tools to consider in your trial strategy;
  • When and how to file a post-trial motion or appeal.
  • Who Should Attend
    Practitioners who handle or are interested in handling eviction defense matters should attend.  The training will prove helpful for new attorneys and for those with experience who want to deepen their use of California procedure and explore new tools to include in their practice.  The sessions will touch on avenues for affirmative litigation to protect low-income tenancies.


    PLI Group Discounts

    Groups of 4-14 from the same organization, all registering at the same time, for a PLI program scheduled for presentation at the same site, are entitled to receive a group discount. For further discount information, please contact membership@pli.edu or call (800) 260-4PLI.

    PLI Can Arrange Group Viewing to Your Firm

    Contact the Groupcasts Department via email at groupcasts@pli.edu for more details.

    Cancellations

    All cancellations received 3 business days prior to the program will be refunded 100%. If you do not cancel within the allotted time period, payment is due in full. You may substitute another individual to attend the program at any time.

    9:00 Opening Remarks
    Lorraine López, Alex Prieto

    9:15 Pre-Answer Motions: Demurrers, Motions to Strike, Motions to Quash
    Interviewing tenants who are facing eviction, common questions come up such as: Was the tenant served?  Does the unlawful detainer complaint contain necessary allegations?  Is the complaint clear?  This panel will address when to consider filing a motion instead of an Answer, what motions may be filed, timing considerations, and what to expect.
    Oliver Ehlinger, Lisa Greif

    10:15 Formal & Informal Discovery in Unlawful Detainers
    Attorneys who represent low-income tenants may gain rapid experience with discovery tools to develop evidence in the case and prepare for trial and settlement discussions.  Key issues to be addressed by this panel include form and special interrogatories, depositions, document demands, when to serve discovery, and how to get documents from government entities and other third parties.
    Ubaldo Fernandez, Leah F. Simon-Weisberg

    11:15 Networking Break

    11:30 Habitability, Retaliation, SLAPP, & Other Considerations
    Tenants with substantive defenses nevertheless face challenges enforcing the law. When should tenants invoke affirmative defenses?  What special statutes apply?  When may attorney fees be awarded?  When should an affirmative suit be considered? This panel will address substantive rights of tenants facing eviction.
    Denise McGranahan, Deepika Sharma

    12:30 Lunch

    1:30 Writing Effective Settlements
    How an unlawful detainer case resolves may have a lasting impact on a low-income tenant’s future ability to find housing.  What key language should be included in settlement agreements?  What are the options for the form of a settlement agreement?  When should tenants elect to go to jury trial?  This panel will address these and other considerations in bringing the unlawful detainer case to resolution.
    Erin Katayama, Shirley Gibson

    2:30 Networking Break

    2:45 Trials & Writs
    This session discuss preparation for trial, strategic considerations for determining when requesting a jury trial will benefit your client, preparation for trial, evidentiary issues and how to incorporate writs into your defense strategy.
    Lorraine López, Alex Prieto

    3:45 Appeals & Post-Trial Motions
    Unlawful detainers are summary proceedings, and both represented and unrepresented tenants may not get the result they desire at trial.  When should a motion for reconsideration or new trial be filed?  When should an appeal be considered?  This panel will address key considerations and procedures in post-trial motions and appeals.
    Christian Abasto, Richard Walker

    4:45 Adjourn



    Co-Chair(s)
    Lorraine López ~ Inner City Law Center
    Alex Prieto ~ Senior Litigator, Western Center on Law and Poverty
    Speaker(s)
    Christian Abasto ~ Managing Attorney, Disability Rights California
    Oliver Ehlinger ~ Managing Attorney, Legal Services of Northern California
    Ubaldo Fernandez ~ Staff Attorney/Clinical Supervisor, Housing Practice, East Bay Community Law Center
    Shirley Gibson ~ Directing Attorney, Home Savers Project, Legal Aid Society of San Mateo County
    Lisa Greif ~ Staff Attorney, Bay Area Legal Aid
    Erin Katayama ~ Supervising Attorney, Homeless Advocacy Project, Justice & Diversity Center of The Bar Association of San Francisco
    Denise McGranahan ~ Senior Attorney, Legal Aid Foundation of Los Angeles
    Deepika Sharma ~ Staff Attorney, Public Counsel
    Leah F. Simon-Weisberg ~ Managing Attorney, Centro Legal de la Raza
    Richard Walker ~ Staff Attorney, Public Law Center
    Program Attorney(s)
    Christina Thompson ~ Senior Pro Bono Program Attorney, Practising Law Institute

    San Francisco Seminar Location

    PLI California Center, 685 Market Street, San Francisco, California 94105. (800) 260-4754.

    San Francisco Hotel Accommodations

    Park Central Hotel, 50 Third Street, San Francisco, CA 94103. 415-974-6400. When calling, please mention PLI and SET#287179. In addition, you may book online at Park Central Hotel PLI.

    Omni Hotel San Francisco, 500 California Street, San Francisco, CA 94104. 415-677-9494.  When calling, please mention Practising Law Institute.  You may also book online at PLI Omni Hotel 2017.

    Due to high demand we recommend reserving hotel rooms as early as possible.

    General credit information about this format appears below. For credit information specific to this program, please choose your jurisdiction(s) in the Credit Information box on the right-hand side of this page.


    U.S. MCLE States

    Alabama: PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

    Alaska:  All PLI products can fulfill Alaska’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

    Arizona:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “interactive CLE” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via interactive CLE programs.

    Arkansas:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

    California:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “participatory” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via participatory programs.

    Colorado:  All PLI products can fulfill Colorado’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

    Connecticut: Effective January 1, 2017, all PLI products can fulfill Connecticut’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

    Delaware:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

    Florida:  All PLI products can fulfill Florida’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

    Georgia:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

    Hawaii:  All PLI products can fulfill Hawaii’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

    Idaho:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

    Illinois: All PLI products can fulfill Illinois' CLE requirements for experienced attorneys. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

    Indiana:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

    Iowa:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

    Kansas:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live programs.

    Kentucky:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

    Louisiana:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

    Maine:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

    Minnesota:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

    Mississippi:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

    Missouri:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

    Montana:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

    Nebraska:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

    Nevada:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

    New Hampshire:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

    New Jersey:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

    New Mexico:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

    New York

    Experienced Attorneys:  All PLI products can fulfill New York’s CLE requirements for experienced attorneys. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

    Newly Admitted Attorneys:  PLI’s transitional live seminars can be used to fulfill the requirements for newly admitted attorneys. All credit categories may be earned via transitional live seminars.

    North Carolina:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars

    North Dakota:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

    Ohio:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

    Oklahoma:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

    Oregon:  All PLI products can fulfill Oregon’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

    Pennsylvania: PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

    Puerto Rico:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

    Rhode Island:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

    South Carolina:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

    Tennessee:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

    Texas:  All PLI products can fulfill Texas’ CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

    Utah:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

    Vermont:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

    Virgin Islands:  All PLI products can fulfill the Virgin Islands’ CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

    Virginia:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live interactive” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live interactive programs.

    Washington:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

    West Virginia:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

    Wisconsin:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

    Wyoming:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

    CPD Jurisdictions

    British Columbia (CPD-BC):  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “real-time” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via real-time programs.

    Ontario (CPD-ON):  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “interactive” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via interactive programs.

    Quebec (CPD-QC): PLI’s live seminars can fulfill Quebec’s CPD requirements.

    Hong Kong (CPD-HK):  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of points an attorney can earn via live seminars.

    United Kingdom (CPD-UK):  PLI’s live seminars can fulfill the United Kingdom’s CPD requirements.

    Australia (CPD-AUS):  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit in all Australian jurisdictions. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

    Other Credit Types

    CPE Credit (NASBA): PLI’s live seminars qualify as “Group-Live delivery” credit.

    IRS Continuing Education (IRS-CE): PLI’s live seminars may fulfill IRS-CE requirements. To request IRS-CE credit, please notify PLI at plicredits@pli.edu of your request and include your Preparer Tax Identification Number (PTIN).

    Certified Fraud Examiner CPE:  PLI’s live seminars may fulfill Certified Fraud Examiner CPE requirements. To request CPE credit or find out which programs offer CPE, please contact PLI at plicredits@pli.edu.

    IAPP Continuing Privacy Credit (CPE):  PLI’s live seminars may fulfill Privacy CPE credit requirements.

    HR Recertification (HRCI):  PLI’s live seminars may fulfill HR credit requirements.

    SHRM Recertification (SHRM):  PLI’s live seminars qualify as "instructor-led" credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an SHRM professional can earn via instructor-led programs.

    Compliance Certification Board (CCB):  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” training events. There is no limit to the number of credits a candidate or certification holder can earn via live programs.

    Certified Anti-Money Laundering Specialists (CAMS):  PLI’s live seminars may fulfill CAMS credit requirements.

    New York State Social Worker Continuing Education (SW CPE):  PLI’s live seminars may fulfill SW CPE credit requirements.

    American Bankers Association Professional Certification (ABA):  PLI’s live seminars may fulfill ABA credit requirements.

     

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