Seminar  Program

Advertising Law Institute 2018


Select a Location:

Why You Should Attend

New media outlets and the growing importance of social networking continue to create new challenges for advertisers, who are fighting harder than ever to preserve and increase market share and to reach their consumers effectively. This program — updated to reflect current legal trends cutting across the advertising industry — is led by an expert faculty who will provide important strategies needed to stay on top of a continually evolving digital landscape. Top practitioners will share their expertise and provide practical tips for managing risk and avoiding pitfalls that arise when running interactive advertising campaigns. Covering topics such as promotions and sweepstakes, mobile advertising challenges, privacy considerations, claim substantiation and more, this expansive program will equip you with the tools you need to practice advertising law today.

What You Will Learn 

  • Learn about promotions and sweepstakes challenges, including issues involving legalized gambling
  • Analyze DMCA and CDA issues and when publishers are responsible for what others post
  • Manage online behavioral advertising and big data challenges
  • Navigate disclosure when the lines between commercial and content are blurred
  • Review takeaways regarding labeling and disclosures
  • Understand key developments in the digital ecosystem
  • Understand the SAG-AFTRA commercials contract
  • Analyze effective pricing and incentive structures that work
  • Explore strategies for in-compliance direct advertising communications; class action updates
  • Learn strategies for proper claim substantiation

Who Should Attend

Firm attorneys, in-house counsel, marketing executives, and allied professionals who practice in the fields of contracts, advertising, media, communications, trademark, and consumer protection law will benefit from this program.


PLI Group Discounts

Groups of 4-14 from the same organization, all registering at the same time, for a PLI program scheduled for presentation at the same site, are entitled to receive a group discount. For further discount information, please contact membership@pli.edu or call (800) 260-4PLI.

PLI Can Arrange Group Viewing to Your Firm

Contact the Groupcasts Department via email at groupcasts@pli.edu for more details.

Cancellations

All cancellations received 3 business days prior to the program will be refunded 100%. If you do not cancel within the allotted time period, payment is due in full. You may substitute another individual to attend the program at any time.

Day One: 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

9:00 Opening Remarks

Holly Grochmal, Robert H. Newman, Liisa M. Thomas



9:15 Claim Substantiation and Comparative Advertising
  • Breaking down the different types of advertising claims
  • How types of claims affect how claims can be substantiated
  • Strategies and best practices for identifying types of advertising claims and avoiding substantiation pitfalls
  • How to utilize trademarks in comparative advertising

Jordan Mitchell Heinz



10:15 Hot Topics in the Digital Ecosystem
  • Navigating issues with new and developing technology in the absence of standard industry terms and conditions
  • Understanding the programmatic landscape and the unique legal challenges posed by the transition to automated media buying systems
  • Developments in invalid traffic, brand safety and fraud
  • Viewability: what you need to know from a legal and practical perspective to navigate the evolving digital marketplace

Holly Grochmal



11:15 Networking Break

11:30 Lessons in Disclosures on Packaging and Labeling

Product packaging and labeling are among the first marketing materials that grab consumer attention, and advertising rules of the road often apply. What are the implications of disclosure obligations for packaging when it comes to safety and health claims, country of origin, seals of approvals, and more? How can we apply recent guidance in FTC consent agreements across industry sectors?

  • Product origins
  • Making conspicuous disclosures: What should you say, how should you say it, and where should you put it?
  • Seals of approval: Explore recent VOC cases and apply the guidance to other spaces
  • When can you put the fine print on the back of a package?
  • How do print schedules for packaging affect claims and disclosures?
  • Lessons to apply across industries: Learning from recent FTC consent agreements

Sheila A. Millar



12:30 Lunch

1:45 Breaking down the SAG-AFTRA Commercials Contract

In this session, we will cover some of the key things that every marketing lawyer needs to know about the SAG-AFTRA Commercial Contract.  Our topics include:

  • Why the SAG-AFTRA Commercials Contract is relevant to you (even if your company is not a signatory)
  • The basics of compensation:  session, holding, and use payments (and beyond)
  • Distinguishing between principal performers and extras
  • What is a “commercial” (and why does it matter)?
  • The rules for using licensed film clips, stock footage, music, and still photos
  • Applying the key waivers:  the Testimonial , Live Event , Man on the Street,  Hidden Camera, and Low Budget Digital Waivers
  • The key SAG provisions that should be included in every celebrity deal
  • Pension and health contributions, allocations and audits
  • And so much more

Brian G. Murphy



2:45 Networking Break

3:00 Advertiser Best Practices for Direct Communications with Customers
  • Understanding the laws and risks of direct marketing to consumers (ie, calling, texting, e-mailing)  
  • Best practices for obtaining consent for sending text messages and tips for settling complaints quickly
  • Strategies for complying with international laws (Canada, EU – GDPR)
  • The latest regulatory and litigation trends, class actions and decisions

Marc S. Roth



4:00 Publisher Liability, DMCA, and CDA Issues
  • When are publishers responsible for what people post?
  • Vicarious liability issues
  • Who created the ad? What happens when the line between the publisher, the advertiser, and the agency are blurred

Speaker to be announced



5:00 Adjourn

Day Two: 9:00 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.

9:00 Big Data and Online Behavioral Advertising (OBA): An Advertiser’s Perspective
  • Origins of big data and how to legally acquire data   
  • Tips for negotiating agreements with vendors 
  • Understanding the legal restrictions, risks, and requirements governing use of consumer data in mobile and online applications
  • Handling cross-platform data collection and use
  • What lies ahead for big data?

Liisa M. Thomas



10:00 Networking Break

10:15 Under the Influence - the Blurred Lines Between Commercial and Content

In this session, we will move beyond traditional commercials and review the legal framework and disclosure obligations applicable to a variety of increasingly popular creative executions for brands, including:

  • Native advertising
  • Influencer advertising
  • Branded entertainment
  • Sponsorship and endorsements
  • Product placement and integrations

Robert H. Newman



11:15 Best Practices for Running Promotions and Sweepstakes   

The Internet and social and mobile media provide companies with many opportunities to promote their products and services. But doing so can get complicated quickly because of the many federal, state, and local laws that govern each digital sweepstakes or skill contest that ask consumers to text, vote, click, comment, and follow. Learn about the hot button legal issues for sweepstakes and contests in new media, including:

  • A call to action as consideration for purposes of the sweepstakes law?
  • Skill contests versus chance-based promotions
  • Tips for complying with disclosure requirements  
  • Developments in online Internet gambling and legalized gambling

Brendan Healey



12:15 Lunch

1:30 Digital Incentives, Pricing and Data in the Advertising Space

Advertisers today use a variety of methods to reach and entice customers, increasing collection of data and creating new risks. When employing incentives such as coupons, rebates, loyalty programs and other offers, how should attorneys advise their clients? In this session learn:

  • Strategies for creating and implementing legally compliant offers
  • How to protect against and combat consumer fraud
  • Tips for avoiding situations where offers become “too good to be true”

Nerissa Coyle McGinn



2:30 Ethics of Advertising
  • How should attorneys handle situations when clients introduce inappropriate ad content?
  • What kinds of ethical situations can arise in the context of ad reviews and how should attorneys handle them?  
  • Avoiding conflicts of interest

Speaker to be announced



3:30 Adjourn

Co-Chair(s)
Holly A. Grochmal ~ Division General Counsel- Sales and Commercial Transactions, Pandora Media, Inc.
Robert H. Newman ~ Loeb & Loeb LLP
Liisa M. Thomas ~ Sheppard Mullin Richter & Hampton LLP
Speaker(s)
Brendan Healey ~ Mandell Menkes LLC
Jordan Mitchell Heinz ~ Kirkland & Ellis LLP
Nerissa Coyle McGinn ~ Loeb & Loeb LLP
Sheila A. Millar ~ Keller & Heckman LLP
Brian G. Murphy ~ Frankfurt Kurnit Klein & Selz PC
Marc S. Roth ~ Davis Wright Tremaine LLP
Program Attorney(s)
Seema Lal Meehan ~ Director, Special Projects and Senior Program Attorney , Practising Law Institute

Chicago Seminar Location

University of Chicago Gleacher Center, 450 N. Cityfront Plaza Drive, Chicago, Il 60611. (312) 464-8787.

Hotel Accommodation

Intercontinental Hotel Chicago, 505 N. Michigan Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611. (312) 944-4100. Please contact the hotel directly for the preferred rate and mention Practising Law Institute or Corporate ID 100312169.  You may also book online at PRACTISING LAW INSTITUTE.    Please note that the rate is a corporate and not a group rate. 

General credit information about this format appears below. For credit information specific to this program, please choose your jurisdiction(s) in the Credit Information box on the right-hand side of this page.


U.S. MCLE States

Alabama: PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Alaska:  All PLI products can fulfill Alaska’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Arizona:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “interactive CLE” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via interactive CLE programs.

Arkansas:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

California:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “participatory” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via participatory programs.

Colorado:  All PLI products can fulfill Colorado’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Connecticut: Effective January 1, 2017, all PLI products can fulfill Connecticut’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Delaware:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Florida:  All PLI products can fulfill Florida’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Georgia:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Hawaii:  All PLI products can fulfill Hawaii’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Idaho:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Illinois: All PLI products can fulfill Illinois' CLE requirements for experienced attorneys. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Indiana:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Iowa:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Kansas:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live programs.

Kentucky:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Louisiana:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Maine:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Minnesota:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Mississippi:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Missouri:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Montana:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Nebraska:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Nevada:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

New Hampshire:  All PLI products can fulfill New Hampshire’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

New Jersey:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

New Mexico:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

New York

Experienced Attorneys:  All PLI products can fulfill New York’s CLE requirements for experienced attorneys. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Newly Admitted Attorneys:  PLI’s transitional live seminars can be used to fulfill the requirements for newly admitted attorneys. All credit categories may be earned via transitional live seminars.

North Carolina:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars

North Dakota:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Ohio:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Oklahoma:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Oregon:  All PLI products can fulfill Oregon’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Pennsylvania: PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Puerto Rico:  All PLI products can fulfill Puerto Rico’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Rhode Island:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

South Carolina:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Tennessee:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Texas:  All PLI products can fulfill Texas’ CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Utah:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Vermont:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Virgin Islands:  All PLI products can fulfill the Virgin Islands’ CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Virginia:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live interactive” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live interactive programs.

Washington:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

West Virginia:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Wisconsin:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Wyoming:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

CPD Jurisdictions

British Columbia (CPD-BC):  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “real-time” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via real-time programs.

Ontario (CPD-ON):  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “interactive” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via interactive programs.

Quebec (CPD-QC): PLI’s live seminars can fulfill Quebec’s CPD requirements.

Hong Kong (CPD-HK):  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of points an attorney can earn via live seminars.

United Kingdom (CPD-UK):  PLI’s live seminars can fulfill the United Kingdom’s CPD requirements.

Australia (CPD-AUS):  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit in all Australian jurisdictions. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Dubai (CLPD-DUBAI):  PLI’s live seminars may fulfill CLPD credit requirements.

Other Credit Types

CPE Credit (NASBA): PLI’s live seminars qualify as the “Group-Live” delivery method. Please check the Credit Information box on the right-hand side of this page to verify CPE credit availability.

IRS Continuing Education (IRS-CE): PLI’s live seminars may fulfill IRS-CE requirements. To request IRS-CE credit, please notify PLI at plicredits@pli.edu of your request and include your Preparer Tax Identification Number (PTIN).

Certified Fraud Examiner CPE:  PLI’s live seminars may fulfill Certified Fraud Examiner CPE requirements. To request CPE credit or find out which programs offer CPE, please contact PLI at plicredits@pli.edu.

IAPP Continuing Privacy Credit (CPE):  PLI’s live seminars may fulfill Privacy CPE credit requirements.

HR Recertification (HRCI):  PLI’s live seminars may fulfill HR credit requirements.

SHRM Recertification (SHRM):  PLI’s live seminars qualify as "instructor-led" credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an SHRM professional can earn via instructor-led programs.

Compliance Certification Board (CCB):  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” training events. There is no limit to the number of credits a candidate or certification holder can earn via live programs.

Certified Anti-Money Laundering Specialists (CAMS):  PLI’s live seminars may fulfill CAMS credit requirements.

New York State Social Worker Continuing Education (SW CPE):  PLI’s live seminars may fulfill SW CPE credit requirements.

American Bankers Association Professional Certification (ABA):  PLI’s live seminars may fulfill ABA credit requirements.

Certified Financial Planners (CFP):  PLI’s live seminars may fulfill CFP credit requirements.

 

Why You Should Attend

New media outlets and the growing importance of social networking continue to create new challenges for advertisers, who are fighting harder than ever to preserve and increase market share and to reach their consumers effectively. This program — updated to reflect current legal trends cutting across the advertising industry — is led by an expert faculty who will provide important strategies needed to stay on top of a continually evolving digital landscape. Top practitioners will share their expertise and provide practical tips for managing risk and avoiding pitfalls that arise when running interactive advertising campaigns. Covering topics such as promotions and sweepstakes, mobile advertising challenges, privacy considerations, claim substantiation and more, this expansive program will equip you with the tools you need to practice advertising law today.

What You Will Learn 

  • Learn about promotions and sweepstakes challenges, including issues involving legalized gambling
  • Analyze DMCA and CDA issues and when publishers are responsible for what others post
  • Manage online behavioral advertising and big data challenges
  • Navigate disclosure when the lines between commercial and content are blurred
  • Review takeaways regarding labeling and disclosures
  • Understand key developments in the digital ecosystem
  • Understand the SAG-AFTRA commercials contract
  • Analyze effective pricing and incentive structures that work
  • Explore strategies for in-compliance direct advertising communications; class action updates
  • Learn strategies for proper claim substantiation

Who Should Attend

Firm attorneys, in-house counsel, marketing executives, and allied professionals who practice in the fields of contracts, advertising, media, communications, trademark, and consumer protection law will benefit from this program.


PLI Group Discounts

Groups of 4-14 from the same organization, all registering at the same time, for a PLI program scheduled for presentation at the same site, are entitled to receive a group discount. For further discount information, please contact membership@pli.edu or call (800) 260-4PLI.

PLI Can Arrange Group Viewing to Your Firm

Contact the Groupcasts Department via email at groupcasts@pli.edu for more details.

Cancellations

All cancellations received 3 business days prior to the program will be refunded 100%. If you do not cancel within the allotted time period, payment is due in full. You may substitute another individual to attend the program at any time.

Day One: 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

9:00 Opening Remarks

Holly Grochmal, Robert H. Newman, Liisa M. Thomas



9:15 Claim Substantiation and Comparative Advertising
  • Breaking down the different types of advertising claims
  • How types of claims affect how claims can be substantiated
  • Strategies and best practices for identifying types of advertising claims and avoiding substantiation pitfalls
  • How to utilize trademarks in comparative advertising

Jordan Mitchell Heinz



10:15 Hot Topics in the Digital Ecosystem
  • Navigating issues with new and developing technology in the absence of standard industry terms and conditions
  • Understanding the programmatic landscape and the unique legal challenges posed by the transition to automated media buying systems
  • Developments in invalid traffic, brand safety and fraud
  • Viewability: what you need to know from a legal and practical perspective to navigate the evolving digital marketplace

Holly Grochmal



11:15 Networking Break

11:30 Lessons in Disclosures on Packaging and Labeling

Product packaging and labeling are among the first marketing materials that grab consumer attention, and advertising rules of the road often apply. What are the implications of disclosure obligations for packaging when it comes to safety and health claims, country of origin, seals of approvals, and more? How can we apply recent guidance in FTC consent agreements across industry sectors?

  • Product origins
  • Making conspicuous disclosures: What should you say, how should you say it, and where should you put it?
  • Seals of approval: Explore recent VOC cases and apply the guidance to other spaces
  • When can you put the fine print on the back of a package?
  • How do print schedules for packaging affect claims and disclosures?
  • Lessons to apply across industries: Learning from recent FTC consent agreements

Sheila A. Millar



12:30 Lunch

1:45 Breaking down the SAG-AFTRA Commercials Contract

In this session, we will cover some of the key things that every marketing lawyer needs to know about the SAG-AFTRA Commercial Contract.  Our topics include:

  • Why the SAG-AFTRA Commercials Contract is relevant to you (even if your company is not a signatory)
  • The basics of compensation:  session, holding, and use payments (and beyond)
  • Distinguishing between principal performers and extras
  • What is a “commercial” (and why does it matter)?
  • The rules for using licensed film clips, stock footage, music, and still photos
  • Applying the key waivers:  the Testimonial , Live Event , Man on the Street,  Hidden Camera, and Low Budget Digital Waivers
  • The key SAG provisions that should be included in every celebrity deal
  • Pension and health contributions, allocations and audits
  • And so much more

Brian G. Murphy



2:45 Networking Break

3:00 Advertiser Best Practices for Direct Communications with Customers
  • Understanding the laws and risks of direct marketing to consumers (ie, calling, texting, e-mailing)  
  • Best practices for obtaining consent for sending text messages and tips for settling complaints quickly
  • Strategies for complying with international laws (Canada, EU – GDPR)
  • The latest regulatory and litigation trends, class actions and decisions

Marc S. Roth



4:00 Digital Incentives, Pricing and Data in the Advertising Space

Advertisers today use a variety of methods to reach and entice customers, increasing collection of data and creating new risks. When employing incentives such as coupons, rebates, loyalty programs and other offers, how should attorneys advise their clients? In this session learn:

  • Strategies for creating and implementing legally compliant offers
  • How to protect against and combat consumer fraud
  • Tips for avoiding situations where offers become “too good to be true”

Nerissa Coyle McGinn



5:00 Adjourn

Day Two: 9:00 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.

9:00 Big Data and Online Behavioral Advertising (OBA): An Advertiser’s Perspective
  • Origins of big data and how to legally acquire data   
  • Tips for negotiating agreements with vendors 
  • Understanding the legal restrictions, risks, and requirements governing use of consumer data in mobile and online applications
  • Handling cross-platform data collection and use
  • What lies ahead for big data?

Liisa M. Thomas



10:00 Networking Break

10:15 Under the Influence - the Blurred Lines Between Commercial and Content

In this session, we will move beyond traditional commercials and review the legal framework and disclosure obligations applicable to a variety of increasingly popular creative executions for brands, including:

  • Native advertising
  • Influencer advertising
  • Branded entertainment
  • Sponsorship and endorsements
  • Product placement and integrations

Robert H. Newman



11:15 Best Practices for Running Promotions and Sweepstakes   

The Internet and social and mobile media provide companies with many opportunities to promote their products and services. But doing so can get complicated quickly because of the many federal, state, and local laws that govern each digital sweepstakes or skill contest that ask consumers to text, vote, click, comment, and follow. Learn about the hot button legal issues for sweepstakes and contests in new media, including:

  • A call to action as consideration for purposes of the sweepstakes law?
  • Skill contests versus chance-based promotions
  • Tips for complying with disclosure requirements  
  • Developments in online Internet gambling and legalized gambling

Brendan Healey



12:15 Lunch

1:30 Publisher Liability, DMCA, and CDA Issues
  • When are publishers responsible for what people post?
  • Vicarious liability issues
  • Who created the ad? What happens when the line between the publisher, the advertiser, and the agency are blurred

Speaker to be announced



2:30 Ethics of Advertising
  • How should attorneys handle situations when clients introduce inappropriate ad content?
  • What kinds of ethical situations can arise in the context of ad reviews and how should attorneys handle them?
  • Avoiding conflicts of interest  

Speaker to be announced



3:30 Adjourn

Co-Chair(s)
Holly A. Grochmal ~ Division General Counsel- Sales and Commercial Transactions, Pandora Media, Inc.
Robert H. Newman ~ Loeb & Loeb LLP
Liisa M. Thomas ~ Sheppard Mullin Richter & Hampton LLP
Speaker(s)
Brendan Healey ~ Mandell Menkes LLC
Jordan Mitchell Heinz ~ Kirkland & Ellis LLP
Nerissa Coyle McGinn ~ Loeb & Loeb LLP
Sheila A. Millar ~ Keller & Heckman LLP
Brian G. Murphy ~ Frankfurt Kurnit Klein & Selz PC
Marc S. Roth ~ Davis Wright Tremaine LLP
Program Attorney(s)
Seema Lal Meehan ~ Director, Special Projects and Senior Program Attorney , Practising Law Institute

San Francisco Seminar Location

PLI California Center, 685 Market Street, San Francisco, California 94105. (800) 260-4754.

San Francisco Hotel Accommodations

Park Central Hotel, 50 Third Street, San Francisco, CA 94103. 415-974-6400. When calling, please mention PLI and SET#287179. In addition, you may book online at Park Central Hotel PLI.

Omni Hotel San Francisco, 500 California Street, San Francisco, CA 94104. 415-677-9494.  When calling, please mention Practising Law Institute.  You may also book online at PLI Omni 2018.

Due to high demand we recommend reserving hotel rooms as early as possible.

General credit information about this format appears below. For credit information specific to this program, please choose your jurisdiction(s) in the Credit Information box on the right-hand side of this page.


U.S. MCLE States

Alabama: PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Alaska:  All PLI products can fulfill Alaska’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Arizona:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “interactive CLE” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via interactive CLE programs.

Arkansas:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

California:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “participatory” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via participatory programs.

Colorado:  All PLI products can fulfill Colorado’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Connecticut: Effective January 1, 2017, all PLI products can fulfill Connecticut’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Delaware:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Florida:  All PLI products can fulfill Florida’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Georgia:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Hawaii:  All PLI products can fulfill Hawaii’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Idaho:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Illinois: All PLI products can fulfill Illinois' CLE requirements for experienced attorneys. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Indiana:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Iowa:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Kansas:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live programs.

Kentucky:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Louisiana:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Maine:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Minnesota:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Mississippi:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Missouri:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Montana:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Nebraska:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Nevada:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

New Hampshire:  All PLI products can fulfill New Hampshire’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

New Jersey:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

New Mexico:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

New York

Experienced Attorneys:  All PLI products can fulfill New York’s CLE requirements for experienced attorneys. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Newly Admitted Attorneys:  PLI’s transitional live seminars can be used to fulfill the requirements for newly admitted attorneys. All credit categories may be earned via transitional live seminars.

North Carolina:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars

North Dakota:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Ohio:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Oklahoma:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Oregon:  All PLI products can fulfill Oregon’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Pennsylvania: PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Puerto Rico:  All PLI products can fulfill Puerto Rico’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Rhode Island:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

South Carolina:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Tennessee:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Texas:  All PLI products can fulfill Texas’ CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Utah:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Vermont:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Virgin Islands:  All PLI products can fulfill the Virgin Islands’ CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Virginia:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live interactive” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live interactive programs.

Washington:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

West Virginia:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Wisconsin:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Wyoming:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

CPD Jurisdictions

British Columbia (CPD-BC):  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “real-time” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via real-time programs.

Ontario (CPD-ON):  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “interactive” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via interactive programs.

Quebec (CPD-QC): PLI’s live seminars can fulfill Quebec’s CPD requirements.

Hong Kong (CPD-HK):  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of points an attorney can earn via live seminars.

United Kingdom (CPD-UK):  PLI’s live seminars can fulfill the United Kingdom’s CPD requirements.

Australia (CPD-AUS):  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit in all Australian jurisdictions. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Dubai (CLPD-DUBAI):  PLI’s live seminars may fulfill CLPD credit requirements.

Other Credit Types

CPE Credit (NASBA): PLI’s live seminars qualify as the “Group-Live” delivery method. Please check the Credit Information box on the right-hand side of this page to verify CPE credit availability.

IRS Continuing Education (IRS-CE): PLI’s live seminars may fulfill IRS-CE requirements. To request IRS-CE credit, please notify PLI at plicredits@pli.edu of your request and include your Preparer Tax Identification Number (PTIN).

Certified Fraud Examiner CPE:  PLI’s live seminars may fulfill Certified Fraud Examiner CPE requirements. To request CPE credit or find out which programs offer CPE, please contact PLI at plicredits@pli.edu.

IAPP Continuing Privacy Credit (CPE):  PLI’s live seminars may fulfill Privacy CPE credit requirements.

HR Recertification (HRCI):  PLI’s live seminars may fulfill HR credit requirements.

SHRM Recertification (SHRM):  PLI’s live seminars qualify as "instructor-led" credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an SHRM professional can earn via instructor-led programs.

Compliance Certification Board (CCB):  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” training events. There is no limit to the number of credits a candidate or certification holder can earn via live programs.

Certified Anti-Money Laundering Specialists (CAMS):  PLI’s live seminars may fulfill CAMS credit requirements.

New York State Social Worker Continuing Education (SW CPE):  PLI’s live seminars may fulfill SW CPE credit requirements.

American Bankers Association Professional Certification (ABA):  PLI’s live seminars may fulfill ABA credit requirements.

Certified Financial Planners (CFP):  PLI’s live seminars may fulfill CFP credit requirements.

 

Why You Should Attend

New media outlets and the growing importance of social networking continue to create new challenges for advertisers, who are fighting harder than ever to preserve and increase market share and to reach their consumers effectively. This program — updated to reflect current legal trends cutting across the advertising industry — is led by an expert faculty who will provide important strategies needed to stay on top of a continually evolving digital landscape. Top practitioners will share their expertise and provide practical tips for managing risk and avoiding pitfalls that arise when running interactive advertising campaigns. Covering topics such as promotions and sweepstakes, mobile advertising challenges, privacy considerations, claim substantiation and more, this expansive program will equip you with the tools you need to practice advertising law today.

What You Will Learn 

  • Learn about promotions and sweepstakes challenges, including issues involving legalized gambling
  • Analyze DMCA and CDA issues and when publishers are responsible for what others post
  • Manage online behavioral advertising and big data challenges
  • Navigate disclosure when the lines between commercial and content are blurred
  • Review takeaways regarding labeling and disclosures
  • Understand key developments in the digital ecosystem
  • Understand the SAG-AFTRA commercials contract
  • Analyze effective pricing and incentive structures that work
  • Explore strategies for in-compliance direct advertising communications; class action updates
  • Learn strategies for proper claim substantiation

Who Should Attend

Firm attorneys, in-house counsel, marketing executives, and allied professionals who practice in the fields of contracts, advertising, media, communications, trademark, and consumer protection law will benefit from this program.


PLI Group Discounts

Groups of 4-14 from the same organization, all registering at the same time, for a PLI program scheduled for presentation at the same site, are entitled to receive a group discount. For further discount information, please contact membership@pli.edu or call (800) 260-4PLI.

PLI Can Arrange Group Viewing to Your Firm

Contact the Groupcasts Department via email at groupcasts@pli.edu for more details.

Cancellations

All cancellations received 3 business days prior to the program will be refunded 100%. If you do not cancel within the allotted time period, payment is due in full. You may substitute another individual to attend the program at any time.

Day One: 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

9:00 Opening Remarks

Holly Grochmal, Robert H. Newman, Liisa M. Thomas



9:15 Claim Substantiation and Comparative Advertising
  • Breaking down the different types of advertising claims
  • How types of claims affect how claims can be substantiated
  • Strategies and best practices for identifying types of advertising claims and avoiding substantiation pitfalls
  • How to utilize trademarks in comparative advertising

Jordan Mitchell Heinz



10:15 Hot Topics in the Digital Ecosystem
  • Navigating issues with new and developing technology in the absence of standard industry terms and conditions
  • Understanding the programmatic landscape and the unique legal challenges posed by the transition to automated media buying systems
  • Developments in invalid traffic, brand safety and fraud
  • Viewability: what you need to know from a legal and practical perspective to navigate the evolving digital marketplace

Holly Grochmal



11:15 Networking Break

11:30 Lessons in Disclosures on Packaging and Labeling

Product packaging and labeling are among the first marketing materials that grab consumer attention, and advertising rules of the road often apply. What are the implications of disclosure obligations for packaging when it comes to safety and health claims, country of origin, seals of approvals, and more? How can we apply recent guidance in FTC consent agreements across industry sectors?

  • Product origins
  • Making conspicuous disclosures: What should you say, how should you say it, and where should you put it?
  • Seals of approval: Explore recent VOC cases and apply the guidance to other spaces
  • When can you put the fine print on the back of a package?
  • How do print schedules for packaging affect claims and disclosures?
  • Lessons to apply across industries: Learning from recent FTC consent agreements

Sheila A. Millar



12:30 Lunch

1:45 Breaking down the SAG-AFTRA Commercials Contract

In this session, we will cover some of the key things that every marketing lawyer needs to know about the SAG-AFTRA Commercial Contract.  Our topics include:

  • Why the SAG-AFTRA Commercials Contract is relevant to you (even if your company is not a signatory)
  • The basics of compensation:  session, holding, and use payments (and beyond)
  • Distinguishing between principal performers and extras
  • What is a “commercial” (and why does it matter)?
  • The rules for using licensed film clips, stock footage, music, and still photos
  • Applying the key waivers:  the Testimonial , Live Event , Man on the Street,  Hidden Camera, and Low Budget Digital Waivers
  • The key SAG provisions that should be included in every celebrity deal
  • Pension and health contributions, allocations and audits
  • And so much more

Brian G. Murphy



2:45 Networking Break

3:00 Advertiser Best Practices for Direct Communications with Customers
  • Understanding the laws and risks of direct marketing to consumers (ie, calling, texting, e-mailing)  
  • Best practices for obtaining consent for sending text messages and tips for settling complaints quickly
  • Strategies for complying with international laws (Canada, EU – GDPR)
  • The latest regulatory and litigation trends, class actions and decisions

Marc S. Roth



4:00 Digital Incentives, Pricing and Data in the Advertising Space

Advertisers today use a variety of methods to reach and entice customers, increasing collection of data and creating new risks. When employing incentives such as coupons, rebates, loyalty programs and other offers, how should attorneys advise their clients? In this session learn:

  • Strategies for creating and implementing legally compliant offers
  • How to protect against and combat consumer fraud
  • Tips for avoiding situations where offers become “too good to be true”

Nerissa Coyle McGinn



5:00 Adjourn

Day Two: 9:00 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.

9:00 Big Data and Online Behavioral Advertising (OBA): An Advertiser’s Perspective
  • Origins of big data and how to legally acquire data   
  • Tips for negotiating agreements with vendors 
  • Understanding the legal restrictions, risks, and requirements governing use of consumer data in mobile and online applications
  • Handling cross-platform data collection and use
  • What lies ahead for big data?

Liisa M. Thomas



10:00 Networking Break

10:15 Under the Influence - the Blurred Lines Between Commercial and Content

In this session, we will move beyond traditional commercials and review the legal framework and disclosure obligations applicable to a variety of increasingly popular creative executions for brands, including:

  • Native advertising
  • Influencer advertising
  • Branded entertainment
  • Sponsorship and endorsements
  • Product placement and integrations

Robert H. Newman



11:15 Best Practices for Running Promotions and Sweepstakes   

The Internet and social and mobile media provide companies with many opportunities to promote their products and services. But doing so can get complicated quickly because of the many federal, state, and local laws that govern each digital sweepstakes or skill contest that ask consumers to text, vote, click, comment, and follow. Learn about the hot button legal issues for sweepstakes and contests in new media, including:

  • A call to action as consideration for purposes of the sweepstakes law?
  • Skill contests versus chance-based promotions
  • Tips for complying with disclosure requirements  
  • Developments in online Internet gambling and legalized gambling

Brendan Healey



12:15 Lunch

1:30 Publisher Liability, DMCA, and CDA Issues
  • When are publishers responsible for what people post?
  • Vicarious liability issues
  • Who created the ad? What happens when the line between the publisher, the advertiser, and the agency are blurred

Speaker to be announced



2:30 Ethics of Advertising
  • How should attorneys handle situations when clients introduce inappropriate ad content?
  • What kinds of ethical situations can arise in the context of ad reviews and how should attorneys handle them?
  • Avoiding conflicts of interest  

Speaker to be announced



3:30 Adjourn

Co-Chair(s)
Holly A. Grochmal ~ Division General Counsel- Sales and Commercial Transactions, Pandora Media, Inc.
Robert H. Newman ~ Loeb & Loeb LLP
Liisa M. Thomas ~ Sheppard Mullin Richter & Hampton LLP
Speaker(s)
Brendan Healey ~ Mandell Menkes LLC
Jordan Mitchell Heinz ~ Kirkland & Ellis LLP
Nerissa Coyle McGinn ~ Loeb & Loeb LLP
Sheila A. Millar ~ Keller & Heckman LLP
Brian G. Murphy ~ Frankfurt Kurnit Klein & Selz PC
Marc S. Roth ~ Davis Wright Tremaine LLP
Program Attorney(s)
Seema Lal Meehan ~ Director, Special Projects and Senior Program Attorney , Practising Law Institute
General credit information about this format appears below. For credit information specific to this program, please choose your jurisdiction(s) in the Credit Information box on the right-hand side of this page.

PLI’s live and on-demand webcasts are single-user license products intended for an individual registrant only. Credit will be issued only to the individual registered. If two or more individuals wish to participate in a webcast and receive credit, PLI would be happy to provide a Groupcast – group viewing of a webcast. To schedule a Groupcast, please contact PLI at groupcasts@pli.edu.


U.S. MCLE States

Alabama:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Alaska:  All PLI products can fulfill Alaska’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Arizona:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “interactive CLE” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via interactive CLE programs.

Arkansas:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

California:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “participatory” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via participatory programs.

Colorado:  All PLI products can fulfill Colorado’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Connecticut: Effective January 1, 2017, all PLI products can fulfill Connecticut’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Delaware:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “eCLE” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of eCLE per reporting period.

Florida:  All PLI products can fulfill Florida’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Georgia:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “in-house” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 in-house credits per reporting period.

Hawaii:  All PLI products can fulfill Hawaii’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Idaho:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Illinois:  All PLI products can fulfill Illinois' CLE requirements for experienced attorneys. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Indiana:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “distance education” credit. Attorneys are limited to 9 credits of distance education per reporting period.

Iowa:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Kansas:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Kentucky:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Louisiana:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 4 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Maine:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Minnesota:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Mississippi:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “distance learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of distance learning per reporting period.

Missouri:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Montana:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Nebraska:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “computer-based learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 5 credits of computer-based learning per reporting period.

Nevada:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

New Hampshire:  All PLI products can fulfill New Hampshire’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

New Jersey:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “alternative verifiable learning formats” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of alternative verifiable learning formats per reporting period.

New Mexico:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

New York

Experienced Attorneys:  All PLI products can fulfill New York’s CLE requirements for experienced attorneys. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Newly Admitted Attorneys:  PLI’s transitional live webcasts can be used to fulfill the requirements for New York newly admitted attorneys. Ethics credit, professional practice credit, and law practice management credit may be earned via transitional live webcasts. Skills credits may not be earned via live webcasts.

North Carolina:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

North Dakota:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Ohio:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Oklahoma:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Oregon:  All PLI products can fulfill Oregon’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Pennsylvania:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “distance learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of distance learning per reporting period.

Puerto Rico:  All PLI products can fulfill Puerto Rico’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Rhode Island:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

South Carolina:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “alternatively delivered” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of alternatively delivered programs per reporting period.

Tennessee:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “distance learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 8 credits of distance learning per reporting period.

Texas:  All PLI products can fulfill Texas’ CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Utah:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Vermont:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Virgin Islands:  All PLI products can fulfill the Virgin Islands’ CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Virginia:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live interactive” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live interactive programs.

Washington:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

West Virginia:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “online” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of online instruction per reporting period.

Wisconsin:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Wyoming:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

CPD Jurisdictions

British Columbia (CPD-BC):  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “real-time” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via real-time programs.

Ontario (CPD-ON):  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “interactive” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via interactive programs.

Quebec (CPD-QC):  PLI’s live webcasts can fulfill Quebec’s CPD requirements.

Hong Kong (CPD-HK):  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “distance learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 15 points of distance learning programs per reporting period.

United Kingdom (CPD-UK):  PLI’s live webcasts can fulfill the United Kingdom’s CPD requirements.

Australia (CPD-AUS):  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill Australia’s CPD requirements. Credit limits for live webcasts vary according to jurisdiction. Please refer to your jurisdiction’s CPD information page for specifics.

Dubai (CLPD-DUBAI):  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill CLPD credit requirements.

Other Credit Types

CPE Credit (NASBA):  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as the “Group-Internet-Based” (GIB) delivery method. Please check the Credit Information box on the right-hand side of this page to verify CPE credit availability.

IRS Continuing Education (IRS-CE):  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill IRS-CE requirements. To request IRS-CE credit, please notify PLI at plicredits@pli.edu of your request and include your Preparer Tax Identification Number (PTIN).

Certified Fraud Examiner CPE:  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill Certified Fraud Examiner CPE requirements. To request CPE credit or find out which programs offer CPE, please contact PLI at plicredits@pli.edu.

IAPP Continuing Privacy Credit (CPE):  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill Privacy CPE credit requirements.

HR Recertification (HRCI):  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill HR credit requirements.

SHRM Recertification (SHRM):  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as "instructor-led" credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an SHRM professional can earn via instructor-led programs.

Compliance Certification Board (CCB):  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” training events. There is no limit to the number of credits a candidate or certification holder can earn via live programs.

Certified Anti-Money Laundering Specialists (CAMS):  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill CAMS credit requirements.

New York State Social Worker Continuing Education (SW CPE):  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill SW CPE credit requirements.

American Bankers Association Professional Certification (ABA):  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill ABA credit requirements.

Certified Financial Planners (CFP):  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill CFP credit requirements.

 

Related Items

On-Demand  On-Demand Programs

Advertising Law Institute 2017 Oct. 20, 2017
Hot Topics in Advertising Law 2017 Jun. 30, 2017

Handbook  Course Handbook Archive

Advertising Law Institute 2018  
Hot Topics in Advertising Law 2018  
Advertising Law Institute 2017 Holly A Grochmal, Pandora Media, Inc.
Robert H Newman, Winston & Strawn LLP
 
Hot Topics in Advertising Law 2017 Ashima A Dayal, Davis & Gilbert LLP
Tsan Abrahamson, Cobalt LLP
 
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Greg Harwood


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