1-Hour Program

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Overview

Structuring employment operations internationally can be simple and straightforward: A multinational decides it wants to operate in a new country, marches in, registers to do business, gets a taxpayer ID number, and hires in-country local workers, payrolling them locally. Unfortunately, though, this default model is not always ideal in today’s fluid, cross-border “gig economy.” And so overlaid on the default model we find a number of creative structures for engaging overseas staff -- consultants, independent contractors, freelancers, contingent workers and “leased employees” (staffers nominally employed, and payrolled, by a different company).

Some nontraditionally structured overseas staff are locals, while others are expatriates or mobile workers heading into a foreign country. Often these nontraditional structures emerge when engaging someone in a country where the organization is not registered to do business and cannot issue a local payroll.

Please join Donald C. Dowling, Jr., from Littler Mendelson P.C. as he:

  • Offers a framework for how to structure and engage overseas staff in ways other than the default model of direct employment on company payroll
  • Reviews a taxonomy of the various types of non-traditional overseas staff
  • Addresses the differences between engaging an overseas local versus letting an existing domestic employee go off and work from a new country
  • Sets out structuring strategies?the pros and cons of the various ways to engage the services of someone to work overseas other than as an employee on company payroll
  • Concludes with a deep dive into engaging overseas “contingent workers,” “consultants” and “freelancers” who, in the eyes of local law, are would-be?but possibly misclassified?independent contractors 

Who Should Attend:

  • Human resources professionals with cross-border responsibilities
  • Employment lawyers advising multinational employers
  • Global mobility and global payroll professionals

Credit Details