On-Demand   On-Demand Web Programs

49th Annual Immigration and Naturalization Institute

Released on: Dec. 13, 2016
Running Time: 12:29:44

In this year’s Institute, an outstanding faculty of leading practitioners will discuss recent developments, key immigration trends, and hot topics. 

You will learn:

  • The new political landscape’s implications for immigration practitioners
  • Opportunities and challenges in H-1B, L-1 practice, and other non-immigrant visa (NIV) categories
  • Permanent Labor Certification Program (PERM) modernization, including consideration of adjudication trends, USDOL reorganization, and regulatory and practical changes
  • Strategies and best practices for responding to government investigations and protecting employers from immigration related penalties
  • The impact of terrorism and international events on immigration policy
  • An update about asylum law, including observing a mock asylum hearing, and practical strategies for representing vulnerable populations
  • Ethical issues for the immigration practitioner

Attorneys (at all levels of practice) specializing in immigration law, who work with immigration matters as part of a diverse practice, or in-house counsel and personnel managers who have responsibility for employment and immigration matters, will benefit from this program.



Lecture Topics [Total time 12:29:44]

Segments with an asterisk (*) are available only with the purchase of the entire program.


  • Welcome and Introduction* [00:13:00]
    Cynthia J. Lange
  • Post-Election Predictions About the Future of Immigration Reform and Implications for [00:56:21]
    Austin T. Fragomen, Jr., Rebecca Peters
  • State Department Update [01:00:24]
    Kathleen Campbell Walker, Cynthia J. Lange
  • Opportunities and Challenges in H-1B, L-1 Practice and Other Non-Immigrant Visa (NIV) Categories – Problems, Solutions, Recent Developments, and Alternatives [01:02:17]
    Marketa Lindt, Cyrus D. Mehta, Allen Orr, Jr.
  • Permanent Labor Certification Program (PERM) Modernization – Current Adjudication Trends and Anticipated Changes [01:00:21]
    Catherine L. Haight, Vincent W. Lau, Sarah K. Peterson
  • Challenges to Entrepreneurs Coming to the United States [01:14:58]
    Lincoln Stone, Stephen W. Yale-Loehr
  • Responding to Government Investigations and Protecting Employers from Immigration-Related Penalties [01:01:19]
    Cynthia J. Lange, Aaron R. Marcu, Jacqueline C. Wolff
  • Families, Women, Children – Immigration Developments in Policy and Processing [01:15:28]
    Michelle Mendez, Carmen M. Rey
  • Asylum Update and Mock Trial [01:31:23]
    Lori K. Adams, Hon. Sarah Burr (Ret.), Mark R. von Sternberg
  • New Trends with Regard to Admissibility [01:14:42]
    Charles H. Kuck, Cyrus D. Mehta
  • The Impact of Terrorism and International Events on Immigration Policy [01:00:22]
    Ira J. Kurzban
  • Ethical Issues for the Immigration Practitioner [00:59:05]
    Jojo Annobil, Robert E. Juceam

The purchase price of this Web Program includes the following articles from the Course Handbook available online:


  • COMPLETE COURSE HANDBOOK
  • Washington Update—2016
    Austin T. Fragomen
  • The Bermuda Blanket L Triangle—What Happened to Admission and Does the New I-129S Change Anything?
    Kathleen Campbell Walker
  • Avoid the Confusion: Complying with the Simeio Decision One Year Later (July 11, 2016)
    Cyrus D. Mehta, Michelle S. Velasco
  • Will the Disruption of the H-1B Lottery Force Change for the Better? (September 30, 2016)
    Cyrus D. Mehta
  • Mining for Gold in the PERM FAQs
    Catherine L. Haight, Vincent W. Lau, Sarah K. Peterson
  • Immigration Challenges for Entrepreneurs Coming to the United States
    Lincoln Stone, Stephen W. Yale-Loehr
  • ICE Investigations—Why In-House Counsel Need to Care About Immigration Compliance
    Jacqueline C. Wolff, Aaron R. Marcu, Cynthia J. Lange
  • United States Department of Justice, U.S. Attorneys’ Manual, Section 1908. Unlawful Employment of Aliens—Criminal Penalties, available at https://www.justice.gov/usam/criminal-resource-manual-1908-unlawfulemployment-aliens-criminal-penalties
    Cynthia J. Lange
  • United States Citizenship and Immigration Services, I-9 Central, Penalties, available at https://www.uscis.gov/i-9-central/penalties
    Cynthia J. Lange
  • I-601A Comparison Chart
    Michelle N. Mendez
  • U Visa Updates
    Michelle N. Mendez
  • 10-Year Ban for Voluntary Departure Overstay Applies to U-1 Adjustment Applicants
    Martin Gauto, Michelle N. Mendez
  • CLINIC Insider Tips: Here’s What the Vermont Service Center and the National Visa Center Had to Say About Family-Based Immigration
    Susan Schreiber, Kristina Karpinski, Michelle N. Mendez
  • Outline of United States Asylum Law: Substantive Criteria and Procedural Concerns
    Mark R. von Sternberg
  • The Provisional Waiver—What It Means and Who Can Use It
    Charles H. Kuck
  • Expansion of the Provisional Waiver: Good News, But Could Be Better (September 26, 2016)
    David A. Isaacson, Cyrus D. Mehta
  • Immigration Inadmissibility, Legal Ethics And Marijuana (October 10, 2016)
    Cyrus D. Mehta
  • Impact of Terrorism and International Events on Immigration
    Ira J. Kurzban
  • Ethical Issues in Immigration Proceedings
    Robert E. Juceam
  • Motions To Reopen Removal, Deportation, or Exclusion Proceedings Based Upon a Claim of Ineffective Assistance of Counsel, 81 Fed. Reg. 49556 (2016) (to be codified at 8 CFR Parts 1003, 1208) (proposed July 28, 2016)
    Robert E. Juceam

Presentation Material


  • Impact of the U.S. Elections on Immigration
    Austin T. Fragomen, Jr., Rebecca Peters
  • Department of State Update –2016
    Kathleen Campbell Walker
  • PERM Modernization
    Catherine L. Haight, Vincent W. Lau, Sarah K. Peterson
  • Challenges to Entrepreneurs Coming to the United States
    Lincoln Stone, Stephen W. Yale-Loehr
  • Eligibility for Employment Authorization
    Michelle Mendez, Carmen M. Rey
  • Extension of Status for T and U Nonimmigrants
    Michelle Mendez, Carmen M. Rey
  • Families, Women, Children
    Michelle Mendez, Carmen M. Rey
  • Interviewing and Assisting Domestic
    Michelle Mendez, Carmen M. Rey
  • Interviewing and Assisting Traffic Survivors
    Michelle Mendez, Carmen M. Rey
  • Notes and Practice Pointers
    Michelle Mendez, Carmen M. Rey
  • Mock Hearing Questions
    Lori K. Adams, Hon. Sarah Burr (Ret.), Mark R. von Sternberg
  • Terrorism, National Security and The Next Four Years
    Robert C. Divine, Ira J. Kurzban
  • Ethical Issues for Immigration Practitioners
    Jojo Annobil, Robert E. Juceam
Chairperson(s)
Cynthia J. Lange ~ Fragomen, Del Rey, Bernsen & Loewy, LLP
Speaker(s)
Lori K. Adams ~ Managing Attorney, Refugee Representation Program, Human Rights First
Jojo Annobil ~ Executive Director, Immigrant Justice Corps
Hon. Sarah Burr (Ret.) ~ Immigration Judge
Austin T. Fragomen, Jr. ~ Fragomen, Del Rey, Bernsen & Loewy, LLP
Catherine L. Haight ~ Haight Law Group, PLC
Robert E. Juceam ~ Fried Frank Harris Shriver & Jacobson LLP
Charles Kuck ~ Kuck Baxter Immigration Partners LLC
Ira J. Kurzban ~ Kurzban Kurzban Weinger Tetzeli & Pratt P.A.
Vincent W. Lau ~ Clark Lau LLC
Marketa Lindt ~ Sidley Austin LLP
Aaron R. Marcu ~ Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP
Cyrus D. Mehta ~ Cyrus D. Mehta & Partners PLLC
Michelle Mendez ~ Training and Legal Support Attorney, Catholic Legal Immigration Network, Inc.
Allen Orr, Jr. ~ Orr Immigration Law Firm P.C.
Rebecca Peters ~ Director of Government Affairs, Council for Global Immigration
Sarah K. Peterson ~ SPS Immigration PLLC
Carmen M. Rey ~ Deputy Director, Immigration Intervention Project, Sanctuary for Families
Lincoln Stone ~ Stone Grzegorek & Gonzalez LLP
Mark R. von Sternberg ~ Senior Attorney, Immigrant & Refugee Services, Catholic Charities Community Services/Archdiocese of New York
Kathleen Campbell Walker ~ Dickinson Wright PLLC
Jacqueline C. Wolff ~ Manatt Phelps & Phillips LLP
Stephen W. Yale-Loehr ~ Miller Mayer LLP
General credit information about this format appears below. For credit information specific to this program, please choose your jurisdiction(s) in the Credit Information box on the right-hand side of this page.

PLI’s live and on-demand webcasts are single-user license products intended for an individual registrant only. Credit will be issued only to the individual registered.


U.S. MCLE States

Alabama:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “online” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of online programs per reporting period.

Alaska:  All PLI products can fulfill Alaska’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Arizona:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “interactive CLE” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via interactive CLE programs.

Arkansas:  PLI’s on-demand web programs are not approved for Arkansas CLE credit.

California:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “participatory” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via participatory programs.

Colorado:  All PLI products can fulfill Colorado’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Connecticut: Effective January 1, 2017, all PLI products can fulfill Connecticut’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Delaware:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “eCLE” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of eCLE per reporting period, no more than 6 of which may be audio-only.

Florida:  All PLI products can fulfill Florida’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Georgia:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “in-house” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 in-house credits per reporting period.

Hawaii:  All PLI products can fulfill Hawaii’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Idaho:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 15 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Illinois:  All PLI products can fulfill Illinois' CLE requirements for experienced attorneys. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Indiana:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “distance education” credit. Attorneys are limited to 9 credits of distance education per reporting period.

Iowa:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “unmoderated” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of unmoderated programs per reporting period.

Kansas:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “prerecorded” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of prerecorded programs per reporting period.

Kentucky:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “non-live” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 non-live credits per reporting period.

Louisiana:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 4 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Maine:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 5.5 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Minnesota:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “on-demand” credit. Attorneys are limited to 15 on-demand credits per reporting period.

Mississippi:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “distance learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of distance learning per reporting period.

Missouri:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Montana:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 5 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Nebraska:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “computer-based learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 5 credits of computer-based learning per reporting period.

Nevada:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via self-study programs.

New Hampshire:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of self-study per reporting period.

New Jersey:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “alternative verifiable learning formats” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of alternative verifiable learning formats per reporting period.

New Mexico:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 4 credits of self-study per reporting period.

New York

Experienced Attorneys:  All PLI products can fulfill New York’s CLE requirements for experienced attorneys. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Newly Admitted Attorneys:  PLI’s transitional on-demand web programs can be used to fulfill the requirements for New York newly admitted attorneys. Only professional practice and law practice management credits may be earned via transitional on-demand web programs. Ethics and skills credits may not be earned via on-demand web programs.

North Carolina:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “online” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of online programs per reporting period.

North Dakota:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 15 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Ohio:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Oklahoma:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “online, on-demand” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of online, on-demand programs per reporting period.

Oregon:  All PLI products can fulfill Oregon’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Pennsylvania:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “distance learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of distance learning per reporting period.

Puerto Rico:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “non-traditional” credit. Attorneys are limited to 8 credits of non-traditional programs per reporting period.

Rhode Island:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “on-demand” credit. Attorneys are limited to 3 on-demand credits per reporting period.

South Carolina:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “alternatively delivered” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of alternatively delivered programs per reporting period.

Tennessee:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “distance learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 8 credits of distance learning per reporting period.

Texas:  All PLI products can fulfill Texas’ CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Utah:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Vermont:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 10 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Virgin Islands:  All PLI products can fulfill the Virgin Islands’ CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Virginia:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “pre-recorded” credit. Attorneys are limited to 8 credits of pre-recorded programs per reporting period.

Washington:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “A/V” credit. Attorneys are limited to 22.5 credits of A/V programs per reporting period.

West Virginia:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “online” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of online instruction per reporting period.

Wisconsin:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “repeated, on-demand” credit. Attorneys are limited to 15 credits of repeated, on-demand programs per reporting period. No ethics credits can be earned via on-demand web programs.

Wyoming:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of self-study per reporting period.


CPD Jurisdictions

British Columbia (CPD-BC):  PLI’s on-demand web programs are not eligible for CPD-BC credit unless viewed with at least one other attorney or an articled student. In this case, the credit must be recorded as a “study group.”

Ontario (CPD-ON):  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “recorded” credit. If viewed without a colleague, attorneys are limited to 6 credits of recorded programs per year. If viewed with at least one colleague, there is no limit to the number of credits that can be earned via recorded programs.

Quebec (CPD-QC):  PLI’s on-demand web programs can fulfill Quebec’s CPD requirements.

Hong Kong (CPD-HK):  PLI’s on-demand web programs are not approved for CPD-HK credit.

United Kingdom (CPD-UK):  PLI’s on-demand web programs can fulfill the United Kingdom’s CPD requirements.

Australia (CPD-AUS):  PLI’s on-demand web programs may fulfill Australia’s CPD requirements. Credit limits for on-demand web programs vary according to jurisdiction. Please refer to your jurisdiction’s CPD information page for specifics.


Other Credit Types

CPE Credit (NASBA):  Select on-demand web programs qualify as “QAS Self-Study” credit. Please check the Credit Information box on the right-hand side of this page to verify CPE credit availability.

IRS Continuing Education (IRS-CE):  PLI’s on-demand web programs may fulfill IRS-CE requirements. To request IRS-CE credit, please notify PLI at plicredits@pli.edu of your request and include your Preparer Tax Identification Number (PTIN).

Certified Fraud Examiner CPE:  PLI’s on-demand web programs may fulfill Certified Fraud Examiner CPE requirements. To request CPE credit or find out which programs offer CPE, please contact PLI at plicredits@pli.edu.

IAPP Continuing Privacy Credit (CPE):  PLI’s on-demand web programs may fulfill Privacy CPE credit requirements.

HR Recertification (HRCI):  PLI’s on-demand web programs may fulfill HR credit requirements.

SHRM Recertification (SHRM):  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as "self-paced" credit. SHRM professionals are limited to 30 credits of self-paced programs per recertification period.

Compliance Certification Board (CCB):  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Candidates are limited to 10 self-study credits per 12-month period, and certification holders are limited to 20 self-study credits per 2-year renewal period.

Certified Anti-Money Laundering Specialists Certification (CAMS):  PLI’s on-demand web programs are not approved for CAMS credit.

New York State Social Worker Continuing Education (SW CPE):  PLI’s on-demand web programs are not approved for SW CPE credit.

American Bankers Association Professional Certification (ABA):  PLI’s on-demand web programs may fulfill ABA credit requirements.

 

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