TreatiseTreatise

Legal Guide to the Business of Marijuana

 by James T. O'Reilly
 
 Copyright: 2018

 Product Details >> 

Product Details

  • ISBN Number: 9781402431340
  • Page Count: 320
  • Number of Volumes: 1
  •  

Legal Guide to the Business of Marijuana is a new and unique resource for lawyers who represent clients in what has been called the fastest growing industry in the United States. The majority of states have enacted laws legalizing medical marijuana — with more than a handful of states to date allowing for recreational use — but marijuana remains illegal under the Federal Controlled Substances Act, giving rise to constitutional challenges to these state laws under the doctrine of preemption. As a result, marijuana enterprises must operate in a legal and regulatory environment of uncertainty, and lawyers representing these enterprises must tread carefully when advising clients.

Written by James T. O’Reilly, a lawyer and public health specialist, Legal Guide to the Business of Marijuana offers critical guidance to help lawyers effectively represent their clients while steering clear of seen and as yet unseen perils implicit in the continued federal-state conflict. The guide provides discussion and analysis of:

• the complex and varying state regulation of medical and non-medical marijuana, including a survey of state cannabis laws, with summaries and citations

• federal law, enforcement, and preemption

• the various aspects of establishing and managing a marijuana enterprise, including the growing, licensing, labeling, transporting, and distribution of marijuana and related products

• the implications of preemption on employment, taxes, and banking

For lawyers new to representing marijuana clients, the author provides an understanding of the definitions of marijuana and other cannabis products, as well as a review of the policy and political issues that have led to the controversy and uncertainty of the current environment.

  Table of Contents
  Preface
Chapter 1: The Big Picture
  • § 1:1 : The Opening Questions1-1
  • § 1:2 : Federal Laws Regulate Marijuana1-9
    • § 1:2.1 : Early Federal Regulation1-9
    • § 1:2.2 : The Controlled Substances Act1-9
    • § 1:2.3 : The Drug Enforcement Administration and Other Federal Agencies1-10
  • § 1:3 : State Regulation of Marijuana1-11
  • § 1:4 : Federal Preemption1-11
  • § 1:5 : International Regulation of Cannabis1-12
  • § 1:6 : Nationwide Marijuana Decriminalization Prospects1-13
  • § 1:7 : Lessons from Other Nations1-14
    • § 1:7.1 : Lessons from Canada1-14
    • § 1:7.2 : Lessons from Mexico1-14
  • § 1:8 : Complications Arising from the Illegal Marijuana Market1-15
Chapter 2: Elements of Federal Conflict with State Marijuana Legislation
  • § 2:1 : Contrasts of Federal and State Legislation2-1
  • § 2:2 : What Is Federal Preemption?2-4
  • § 2:3 : How Could Congress Change the Status of Marijuana?2-4
    • § 2:3.1 : Political Challenges2-5
    • § 2:3.2 : Use of the Appropriations “Rider” System2-6
  • § 2:4 : State Ballot Initiatives and Federal Preemption2-8
Chapter 3: Understanding the Diverse Terms of State Marijuana Legislation
  • § 3:1 : Survey of the Popular Terms in Marijuana Statutes3-1
  • § 3:2 : State Definitions and Inclusions3-2
  • § 3:3 : State Exclusions and Hemp3-3
  • § 3:4 : State Medical Marijuana Provisions3-4
  • § 3:5 : Growing, Licensing, and Siting Issues3-5
    • § 3:5.1 : Advising on the License Selection Process3-6
  • § 3:6 : Inspections3-8
  • § 3:7 : Statutory Limitations3-9
  • § 3:8 : State Criminal Statutes and “Decriminalization”3-9
  • § 3:9 : Laws Allowing Recreational Non-Medical Use3-10
    • § 3:9.1 : Where, When, and How Non-Medical Use Is Permitted3-10
    • § 3:9.2 : Why Legalization of Recreational Use Is Supported3-11
    • § 3:9.3 : Adoption of State Recreational Marijuana Statutes3-12
    • § 3:9.4 : What Has Been Learned in the Transitions Among Laws?3-13
Chapter 4: Medical and Prescribing Issues for Marijuana Patients
  • § 4:1 : Current Medical Discussions on Marijuana Benefits and Harms4-1
  • § 4:2 : Current Medical Norms on Prescribing/Recommending Marijuana4-3
  • § 4:3 : Role of the Prescriber and the State Medicinal Marijuana Statute4-3
  • § 4:4 : Medical Conditions for Which Marijuana May Be Prescribed4-5
  • § 4:5 : Limited Quantities Allowed to Be Purchased4-6
  • § 4:6 : Dispensary Controls and Safeguards4-7
  • § 4:7 : Licensure4-9
  • § 4:8 : Caregiver Registration to Obtain Marijuana for Patients4-10
  • § 4:9 : Dispensary-Processor Supply Chains for Filling Prescriptions4-11
  • § 4:10 : Enforcement Sanctions on Dispensaries4-11
  • § 4:11 : Implications of Marijuana Use for Hospitals and Clinics4-12
  • § 4:12 : Health Fraud Problems with Medical Benefit Claims for Cannabis Products4-12
  • § 4:13 : Costs of Facilities for Medical Marijuana4-12
  • § 4:14 : Public Health Issues4-13
Chapter 5: Roles of Criminal Law
  • § 5:1 : Criminal Statutes Continue in Force5-1
  • § 5:2 : Marijuana Possession and Quantity5-2
  • § 5:3 : Constitutional Rights Defense5-3
  • § 5:4 : Marijuana Odor and Searches5-4
  • § 5:5 : Pre-Trial Diversion and Youthful Offender Provisions5-4
  • § 5:6 : Prosecution As a Means of Enforcing Medical Marijuana Limits5-5
  • § 5:7 : Inter-Relationship of Marijuana Use and Crime5-5
  • § 5:8 : The Special Case of Synthetic Cannabis Products5-5
  • § 5:9 : Sentencing5-6
  • § 5:10 : Public Housing and Consequences of Use of Marijuana5-6
Chapter 6: Non-Smoked Forms of THC Delivery: Pills, Oils, Food, and E-cigarettes
  • § 6:1 : Overview6-1
  • § 6:2 : Which Regulator Governs Which Product?6-2
  • § 6:3 : Forms of Delivery6-3
    • § 6:3.1 : Edibles6-3
      • [A] : Difficulty of Regulating Food As a THC Delivery System6-4
      • [B] : Defining a “Dose” of a Food Infused with THC6-5
    • § 6:3.2 : THC in Pills and Tablet Forms6-7
      • [A] : Would Investors Fund Drug Approval Testing for a THC Pill?6-10
    • § 6:3.3 : Oils, Gels, Patches, and Liquid Forms of THC6-10
    • § 6:3.4 : Electronic Cigarettes6-11
    • § 6:3.5 : Cannabis Analogue Products6-12
  • § 6:4 : Marketing, Packaging, and Labeling6-12
    • § 6:4.1 : Barriers to Nationwide Marketing of Cannabis-Derived Products6-12
    • § 6:4.2 : Marking THC Edibles6-13
    • § 6:4.3 : Safety Packaging of THC or CBD Foods6-14
Chapter 7: The Business of Marijuana
  • § 7:1 : Federal Law and Movement of Marijuana Sale Proceeds7-1
    • § 7:1.1 : Overview7-1
    • § 7:1.2 : Federal Criminal Risk of Drug “Proceeds” Seizure7-2
    • § 7:1.3 : State-Law Legality of Sale Transactions7-3
    • § 7:1.4 : DEA Use of State-Required Marijuana Sales Reports7-4
  • § 7:2 : Federal Financial Crimes Policy Related to Marijuana7-5
  • § 7:3 : Alternative Options for Handling Marijuana Business Proceeds7-8
  • § 7:4 : Business Development and Competitive Factors7-9
    • § 7:4.1 : Commercial Aspects of Marijuana Retail Operations7-9
    • § 7:4.2 : Marketing Under Restrictions7-10
    • § 7:4.3 : Dispensary Operations7-11
    • § 7:4.4 : The Role of Price Competition7-11
    • § 7:4.5 : Growth of the Marijuana Industry7-11
    • § 7:4.6 : Recreational Marijuana Distribution7-12
    • § 7:4.7 : Seller’s Liability for User’s Accidents7-12
Chapter 8: Tax Issues
  • § 8:1 : Background8-1
  • § 8:2 : IRS Status of Dispensary and Grower Transactions8-2
  • § 8:3 : Taxation Benefits for States8-2
    • § 8:3.1 : State Tax Experience in Colorado8-3
  • § 8:4 : Local Taxing Powers8-3
Chapter 9: Employment Issues
  • § 9:1 : Discipline and Termination9-1
    • § 9:1.1 : Overview9-1
    • § 9:1.2 : Employer Options9-3
    • § 9:1.3 : Discipline for On-the-Job Impairment9-5
    • § 9:1.4 : Controls on Marijuana-Related Violations of Employer Disciplinary Rules9-6
    • § 9:1.5 : Termination9-7
  • § 9:2 : Unions9-7
    • § 9:2.1 : Union Effects Upon Employer Discipline Options9-7
    • § 9:2.2 : Unions May Decline to Pay for Marijuana Grievance Cases9-8
    • § 9:2.3 : NLRB Response to Employee Termination Complaints9-9
  • § 9:3 : Refusal to Hire: Effect of State Marijuana Legislation9-9
  • § 9:4 : EEOC Responses to Marijuana-Related Employment Conflicts9-10
  • § 9:5 : Marijuana Industry Employees: Federal Law Risks and Restrictions9-11
  • § 9:6 : Workers’ Compensation9-12
  • § 9:7 : Predictions of Future Worker Rights9-12
Chapter 10: Growing and Processing of Marijuana
  • § 10:1 : Agricultural Controls and Limitations on Growers of All Crops10-1
  • § 10:2 : How Legal Marijuana Growers Operate in Permitted States10-2
  • § 10:3 : Agricultural Worker Credentials Review10-3
  • § 10:4 : Elements Necessary for Growing Marijuana10-3
  • § 10:5 : Federal CSA Conditions and Exemptions10-3
  • § 10:6 : State Site Limitations10-4
  • § 10:7 : Agricultural Equipment Finance Needs10-4
  • § 10:8 : Environmental Issues10-5
  • § 10:9 : Water Use for Cannabis Growing10-6
  • § 10:10 : Growing Indoor Marijuana Crops10-7
  • § 10:11 : Hemp Production Is Not Marijuana Growing10-8
  • § 10:12 : Processing Cannabinoids10-8
  • § 10:13 : Real Estate Issues10-9
  • § 10:14 : Liability Aspects of Marijuana Growing10-10
  • § 10:15 : Individuals Growing Marijuana for Personal Use10-11
Chapter 11: Vehicle Driving Risks and Enforcement
  • § 11:1 : Overview11-1
  • § 11:2 : Effects of Impairment11-3
    • § 11:2.1 : Medical Evidence of Effects of THC Use on Driving11-3
    • § 11:2.2 : Marijuana and Alcohol Combined Effects11-5
  • § 11:3 : Driver Safety Regulations11-6
    • § 11:3.1 : Congressional Interest in Marijuana-Related Driver Safety11-6
    • § 11:3.2 : State Regulation11-7
    • § 11:3.3 : Use of Alternate Proofs of Impairment11-8
    • § 11:3.4 : Defenses Available Under State Laws11-8
  • § 11:4 : Traffic Stops and Vehicle Searches11-9
    • § 11:4.1 : Arrest for “Per Se Impaired” Status, Despite Lack of Test11-9
    • § 11:4.2 : Probable Cause for Police Search for Marijuana in Vehicle11-11
Chapter 12: Professional Licensure and Ethical Constraints
  • § 12:1 : Overview12-1
  • § 12:2 : Physicians and Nurses12-2
  • § 12:3 : Pharmacists12-3
  • § 12:4 : Dispensaries12-3
  • § 12:5 : Hospitals and Clinics12-4
  • § 12:6 : Attorneys12-4
Chapter 13: Transportation, Customs, and Delivery Issues
  • § 13:1 : Moving Marijuana Poses Federal/State Preemption Conflicts13-1
  • § 13:2 : Effect of Court Decisions13-2
  • § 13:3 : Documentation of Source and Delivery Under State Laws13-3
  • § 13:4 : Volume Limitations for Marijuana Shipments13-3
  • § 13:5 : Criminal Risks to Marijuana Transporters13-4
  • § 13:6 : Customs, ICE, and Shared Jurisdiction13-4
Chapter 14: Role of Local Regulators and Administrators
  • § 14:1 : Shared Jurisdiction14-1
  • § 14:2 : Marijuana and Zoning of Dispensaries, Growers, and Processors14-2
  • § 14:3 : Intrastate Preemption of Local Controls14-3
  • § 14:4 : Local Taxing Powers14-3
  • § 14:5 : Effects of Voter Referendum/Initiative Elections14-4
Chapter 15: Products Liability and Cannabis Products
  • § 15:1 : State Requirements for Product Labeling15-1
  • § 15:2 : Liability Consequences of Inadequate Labeling15-2
  • § 15:3 : Packaging Defense Against Child Ingestion15-3
Appendix A: State Statutes, Regulations, and Relevant Cases
  Index

  Please click here to view the latest update information for this title: Last Update Information  
 

Share
Email
UPKEEP SERVICE
Your purchase will also sign you up for “Upkeep Service,” whereby you will receive future automatic shipments of updates, new editions and supplements to this edition, as they become available, for a 30-day preview. Updates, new editions and supplements published within 90 days of your purchase will be issued free of charge; all other updates will be subject to an additional charge if kept beyond the preview period, invoiced at the time of delivery. This service will continue until canceled by you at any time. See here.

  • FOLLOW PLI:
  • twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • YouTube
  • RSS

All Contents Copyright © 1996-2018 Practising Law Institute. Continuing Legal Education since 1933.

© 2018 PLI PRACTISING LAW INSTITUTE. All rights reserved. The PLI logo is a service mark of PLI.