On-Demand   On-Demand Web Programs

Environmental Regulation 2017: Hot Topics, Regulatory Developments, and Practical Guidance for Corporate Compliance

Released on: Jun. 26, 2017
Running Time: 07:14:44

This program will review recent activities in environmental regulation – and de-regulation – affecting compliance obligations for a range of businesses and organizations.  Among other topics, our program will cover the impact of recent court decisions, new regulations and initiatives affecting regulated entities, and practical suggestions for management and compliance.

This program will take a comprehensive look at how new developments in environmental regulations and case law will affect deal negotiations, daily operations and corporate compliance efforts.  Join us and our expert faculty for an insightful look into the current regulatory landscape and for many helpful takeaways to support your practice.     

Attorneys and compliance professionals invested in operations affected by environmental law and regulation will benefit from this program.

 Topics Include:

  • Implementation of the new amendments to the Toxic Substances Control Act
  • Adapting environmental practice under the new administration
  • The intersection of environmental law with bankruptcy
  • Safe drinking water and lead paint issues
  • Latest developments in the environmental insurance market
  • And much more!

Lecture Topics [Total time 07:14:44]

Segments with an asterisk (*) are available only with the purchase of the entire program.

  • Introductory Remarks* [00:10:40]
    Philip E. Karmel, Duke K. McCall, III
  • Chemical Management – What You Need to Know about TSCA, Compliance, and Business Risk [01:01:38]
    Lynn L. Bergeson
  • Environmental Practice in an Era of Federal Deregulation [01:00:13]
    Deborah Goldberg, Michael Myers, Philip E. Karmel
  • Corporate America Steps Up To Climate Change and Environmental Review Issues for the New Administration’s Infrastructure Program [01:02:01]
    Philip E. Karmel, J. Kevin Healy
  • Treatment and Discharge of Environmental Liabilities in Bankruptcy and Implications for Cleanups and Corporate Transactions [01:00:41]
    Maureen M. Crough, Duke K. McCall, III, Julia Frost Davies
  • Safe Drinking Water [00:59:29]
    Dimple Chaudhary, Randy Hayman
  • Legal Ethics for Environmental Lawyers [01:00:23]
    Dana Post, Michael Quinn
  • Hot Topics in Environmental Regulation and Environmental Insurance [00:59:40]
    Kathy Robb, Jack Palis

The purchase price of this Web Program includes the following articles from the Course Handbook available online:


  • COMPLETE COURSE HANDBOOK
  • Chemical Management—What You Need to Know About TSCA, Compliance, and Business Risk (June 9, 2017)
    Lynn L. Bergeson
  • The Frank R. Lautenberg Chemical Safety for the 21st Century Act, First Year Implementation Plan (June 29, 2016)
    Lynn L. Bergeson
  • An Analysis of TSCA Reform Provisions Pertinent to Industrial Biotechnology Stakeholders, Industrial Biotechnology, Vol. 12, No. 4 (August 2016)
    Lynn L. Bergeson, Charles M. Auer
  • Role of ‘Conditions of Use’ Under Sections 5 and 6 of Amended Toxics Law, BNA Insights, No.199 (October 14, 2016)
    Charles M. Auer, Lynn L. Bergeson
  • Practitioner Insights: A Review and Analysis of TSCA Reform Provisions Pertinent to Manufacturers and Processors of Nanoscale Materials, BNA Insights, No. 16 (January 26, 2017)
    Lynn L. Bergeson, Charles M. Auer
  • Environmental Practice in an Era of Federal Deregulation
    Philip E. Karmel
  • Whatever the Political Climate May be, Corporate America Is Stepping Up to the Challenge of Climate Change
    J. Kevin Healy, Brian M. Jacobson
  • Environmental Review and Permitting Issues for Major Infrastructure Projects (Substantive Outline) (April 2017)
    Philip E. Karmel
  • Two Key Environmental Transactional Issues in Bankruptcy: Remedial Liability for Acquired Property and Whether Remedial Obligations Are Claims That Can Be Discharged (April 12, 2017)
    Maureen M. Crough
  • Morgan Lewis, Lawflash,Tenth Circuit: Asarco’s Settlement in Bankruptcy Proceeding Does Not Bar CERCLA Contribution Claim (January 10, 2017)
    Duke K. McCall, III, Douglas A. Hastings
  • Decommissioning Oil and Gas Facilities: Challenges in (and Out of) Bankruptcy, American Bar Association, Environmental & Energy Litigation, Winter 2017 Vol. 1, No. 2 (February 28, 2017)
    Andrew J. Gallo, Duke K. McCall, III
  • Erik Olson and Kristi Pullen Fedinick, National Resources Defense Council, What’s in Your Water? Flint and Beyond: Analysis of EPA Data Reveals Widespread Lead Crisis Potentially Affecting Millions of Americans
    Randy E. Hayman, Dimple Chaudhary
  • Peter C. Grevatt, Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Ground and Drinking Water, Memorandum, Implementation of the Lead and Copper Rule Provisions Related to Sample Site Selection and Triennial Monitoring (October 13, 2016)
    Randy E. Hayman
  • Attorney Ethical Duties to Protect Client Data (Substantive Outline)
    Dana L. Post, Michael Quinn
  • Hot Topics in Environmental Insurance (Substantive Outline) (April 2017)
    Jack Palis

Presentation Material


  • Chemical Management – What You Need to Know about TSCA, Compliance, and Business Risk
    Lynn L. Bergeson
  • Environmental Practice in an Era of Federal Deregulation
    Michael Myers
  • Environmental Practice in an Era of Federal Deregulation
    Philip E. Karmel
  • Environmental Practice in an Era of Federal Deregulation Handout
    Michael Myers
  • Treatment and Discharge of Environmental Liabilities in Bankruptcy and Implications for Cleanups and Corporate Transactions
    Julia Frost Davies
  • Treatment and Discharge of Environmental Liabilities in Bankruptcy and Implications for Cleanups and Corporate Transactions
    Duke K. McCall, III
  • Treatment and Discharge of Environmental Liabilities in Bankruptcy and Implications for Cleanups and Corporate Transactions
    Maureen M. Crough
  • Safe Drinking Water
    Randy Hayman
  • Safe Drinking Water
    Dimple Chaudhary
  • Legal Ethics for Environmental Lawyers
    Dana Post, Michael Quinn
  • Hot Topics in Environmental Regulation and Environmental Insurance
    Jack Palis
  • Hot Topics in Environmental Regulation and Environmental Insurance Handout
    Kathy Robb
Co-Chair(s)
Philip E. Karmel ~ Bryan Cave LLP
Duke K. McCall, III ~ Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP
Speaker(s)
Jack Palis ~ Environmental Practice , Marsh
Lynn L. Bergeson ~ Bergeson & Campbell, P.C.
Dimple Chaudhary ~ Senior Attorney, Natural Resources Defense Council
Maureen M. Crough ~ Sidley Austin LLP
Julia Frost Davies ~ Partner, Morgan Lewis & Bockius LLP
Deborah Goldberg ~ Managing Attorney, Earthjustice
Randy Hayman ~ Principal, Beveridge & Diamond P C
J. Kevin Healy ~ Bryan Cave LLP
Michael Myers ~ Assistant Attorney General, NYS Ofc of the Attorney General
Dana Post ~ Senior Legal Editor, Privacy & Data Security, Thomson Reuters
Michael Quinn ~ Kroll Associates, Inc.
Kathy Robb ~ Sive, Paget & Riesel, P.C.
General credit information about this format appears below. For credit information specific to this program, please choose your jurisdiction(s) in the Credit Information box on the right-hand side of this page.

PLI’s live and on-demand webcasts are single-user license products intended for an individual registrant only. Credit will be issued only to the individual registered.


U.S. MCLE States

Alabama:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “online” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of online programs per reporting period.

Alaska:  All PLI products can fulfill Alaska’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Arizona:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “interactive CLE” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via interactive CLE programs.

Arkansas:  PLI’s on-demand web programs are not approved for Arkansas CLE credit.

California:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “participatory” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via participatory programs.

Colorado:  All PLI products can fulfill Colorado’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Connecticut: Effective January 1, 2017, all PLI products can fulfill Connecticut’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Delaware:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “eCLE” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of eCLE per reporting period, no more than 6 of which may be audio-only.

Florida:  All PLI products can fulfill Florida’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Georgia:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “in-house” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 in-house credits per reporting period.

Hawaii:  All PLI products can fulfill Hawaii’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Idaho:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 15 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Illinois:  All PLI products can fulfill Illinois' CLE requirements for experienced attorneys. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Indiana:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “distance education” credit. Attorneys are limited to 9 credits of distance education per reporting period.

Iowa:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “unmoderated” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of unmoderated programs per reporting period.

Kansas:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “prerecorded” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of prerecorded programs per reporting period.

Kentucky:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “non-live” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 non-live credits per reporting period.

Louisiana:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 4 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Maine:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 5.5 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Minnesota:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “on-demand” credit. Attorneys are limited to 15 on-demand credits per reporting period.

Mississippi:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “distance learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of distance learning per reporting period.

Missouri:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Montana:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 5 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Nebraska:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “computer-based learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 5 credits of computer-based learning per reporting period.

Nevada:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via self-study programs.

New Hampshire:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of self-study per reporting period.

New Jersey:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “alternative verifiable learning formats” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of alternative verifiable learning formats per reporting period.

New Mexico:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 4 credits of self-study per reporting period.

New York

Experienced Attorneys:  All PLI products can fulfill New York’s CLE requirements for experienced attorneys. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Newly Admitted Attorneys:  PLI’s transitional on-demand web programs can be used to fulfill the requirements for New York newly admitted attorneys. Only professional practice and law practice management credits may be earned via transitional on-demand web programs. Ethics and skills credits may not be earned via on-demand web programs.

North Carolina:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “online” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of online programs per reporting period.

North Dakota:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 15 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Ohio:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Oklahoma:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “online, on-demand” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of online, on-demand programs per reporting period.

Oregon:  All PLI products can fulfill Oregon’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Pennsylvania:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “distance learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of distance learning per reporting period.

Puerto Rico:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “non-traditional” credit. Attorneys are limited to 8 credits of non-traditional programs per reporting period.

Rhode Island:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “on-demand” credit. Attorneys are limited to 3 on-demand credits per reporting period.

South Carolina:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “alternatively delivered” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of alternatively delivered programs per reporting period.

Tennessee:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “distance learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 8 credits of distance learning per reporting period.

Texas:  All PLI products can fulfill Texas’ CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Utah:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Vermont:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 10 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Virgin Islands:  All PLI products can fulfill the Virgin Islands’ CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Virginia:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “pre-recorded” credit. Attorneys are limited to 8 credits of pre-recorded programs per reporting period.

Washington:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “A/V” credit. Attorneys are limited to 22.5 credits of A/V programs per reporting period.

West Virginia:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “online” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of online instruction per reporting period.

Wisconsin:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “repeated, on-demand” credit. Attorneys are limited to 15 credits of repeated, on-demand programs per reporting period. No ethics credits can be earned via on-demand web programs.

Wyoming:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of self-study per reporting period.


CPD Jurisdictions

British Columbia (CPD-BC):  PLI’s on-demand web programs are not eligible for CPD-BC credit unless viewed with at least one other attorney or an articled student. In this case, the credit must be recorded as a “study group.”

Ontario (CPD-ON):  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “recorded” credit. If viewed without a colleague, attorneys are limited to 6 credits of recorded programs per year. If viewed with at least one colleague, there is no limit to the number of credits that can be earned via recorded programs.

Quebec (CPD-QC):  PLI’s on-demand web programs can fulfill Quebec’s CPD requirements.

Hong Kong (CPD-HK):  PLI’s on-demand web programs are not approved for CPD-HK credit.

United Kingdom (CPD-UK):  PLI’s on-demand web programs can fulfill the United Kingdom’s CPD requirements.

Australia (CPD-AUS):  PLI’s on-demand web programs may fulfill Australia’s CPD requirements. Credit limits for on-demand web programs vary according to jurisdiction. Please refer to your jurisdiction’s CPD information page for specifics.


Other Credit Types

CPE Credit (NASBA):  Select on-demand web programs qualify as “QAS Self-Study” credit. Please check the Credit Information box on the right-hand side of this page to verify CPE credit availability.

IRS Continuing Education (IRS-CE):  PLI’s on-demand web programs may fulfill IRS-CE requirements. To request IRS-CE credit, please notify PLI at plicredits@pli.edu of your request and include your Preparer Tax Identification Number (PTIN).

Certified Fraud Examiner CPE:  PLI’s on-demand web programs may fulfill Certified Fraud Examiner CPE requirements. To request CPE credit or find out which programs offer CPE, please contact PLI at plicredits@pli.edu.

IAPP Continuing Privacy Credit (CPE):  PLI’s on-demand web programs may fulfill Privacy CPE credit requirements.

HR Recertification (HRCI):  PLI’s on-demand web programs may fulfill HR credit requirements.

SHRM Recertification (SHRM):  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as "self-paced" credit. SHRM professionals are limited to 30 credits of self-paced programs per recertification period.

Compliance Certification Board (CCB):  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Candidates are limited to 10 self-study credits per 12-month period, and certification holders are limited to 20 self-study credits per 2-year renewal period.

Certified Anti-Money Laundering Specialists Certification (CAMS):  PLI’s on-demand web programs are not approved for CAMS credit.

New York State Social Worker Continuing Education (SW CPE):  PLI’s on-demand web programs are not approved for SW CPE credit.

American Bankers Association Professional Certification (ABA):  PLI’s on-demand web programs may fulfill ABA credit requirements.

 

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