On-Demand   On-Demand Web Programs

Fundamentals of Privacy Law 2017

Released on: Dec. 27, 2017
Running Time: 06:13:22

It used to be that only “death and taxes” were inevitable, but for attorneys these days, add to that list, “Privacy.” This seminar will give general practitioners, litigators, corporate counsel, and transactional attorneys a fundamental understanding about how privacy connects and works with other practice areas as well as the basics of the security of personal information and regulatory enforcement. You will be able to know where to start when your client asks that privacy law question, recognize when privacy impacts a transaction, understand what is “PII,” and know how to address privacy in your day-to-day advice.

Lecture Topics [Total time 00:06:45]
Segments with an asterisk (*) are available only with the purchase of the entire program.
  • Opening Remarks and Introduction* [00:06:37]
    Ken Mortensen
  • Information Security Program Basics [01:02:37]
    Stephen Y. Chow, Jose Antonio Sesin
  • Health Privacy Foundations [01:01:40]
    Josephine Cicchetti, Debra Hampson, Matthew F. Fitzsimmons
  • Financial Privacy Fundamentals [01:00:27]
    Joseph V. DeMarco, Jane Levine, Andy Roth, Danny West, Urvashi Sen
  • Digital Privacy Basics [01:00:32]
    Todd Ruback, Cathlin Tully, Elaine C. Zacharakis
  • Advertising Law Foundations [00:59:56]
    Rick Buck, Gary A. Kibel, Tanya Madison
  • Global Privacy Overview [01:01:32]
    Ken Mortensen, Kristen K. Hall, Peter F. McLaughlin

The purchase price of this Web Program includes the following articles from the Course Handbook available online:


  • COMPLETE COURSE HANDBOOK
  • Information Security—Conceptual, Legal and Regulatory Basics
    Stephen Y. Chow
  • Developing Personal Information Security Policies: Best Practices in Handling and Use of Personal Information (October 23, 2017)
    Ellen M. Giblin, Jose Antonio Sesin
  • Managing a Data Security Breach: Best Practices in Managing a Data Security Breach (October 23, 2017)
    Ellen M. Giblin, Jose Antonio Sesin
  • Negotiating Cloud Contracts: Best Practices in Managing Cloud Providers (October 23, 2017)
    Ellen M. Giblin, Jose Antonio Sesin
  • Securing Health Information: Third-Party Risk (October 12, 2017)
    Josephine Cicchetti
  • HIPAA Enforcement Issues
    Debra Hampson
  • New York Law Journal: Strategies for Navigating Business-to-Business Data Breaches (July 6, 2015)
    Joseph V. DeMarco, Urvashi Sen
  • New York State Department of Financial Services 23 NYCRR 500: Cybersecurity Requirements for Financial Services Companies (February 13, 2017)
    Joseph V. DeMarco
  • U.S. Federal Trade Commission: Privacy and Data Security Update: 2016
    Cathlin Tully
  • Davis & Gilbert LLP, Digital Media, Technology & Privacy Alert: T Minus 1 Year Until GDPR: Are You Ready for Take Off? (May 2017)
    Justin H. Lee, Vivian Wang, Gary A. Kibel
  • Davis & Gilbert LLP, Digital Media, Technology & Privacy Alert: FTC’s New Staff Report Applies Privacy Principles to Cross-Device Tracking (February 2017)
    Gary A. Kibel, Richard S. Eisert, Vejay G. Lalla
  • Davis & Gilbert LLP, Digital Media, Technology & Privacy Alert: Enforcement of DAA Cross-Device Guidance to Begin on February 1, 2017 (November 2016)
    Gary A. Kibel, Richard S. Eisert
  • Davis & Gilbert LLP, Digital Media, Technology & Privacy Alert: A Fallen Warrior in the Game of Mobile Privacy (October 2016)
    Gary A. Kibel, James L. Johnston, Vivian Wang
  • Global Privacy Overview 2017: European Privacy Law
    Ken Mortensen
  • EU-U.S. Privacy Shield Framework Principles Issued by the U.S. Department of Commerce
    Ken Mortensen
  • APEC Privacy Framework (2015)
    Ken Mortensen
  • Australian Privacy Act 1988—No. 119, 1988; Compilation No. 76 (August 23, 2017)
    Ken Mortensen
  • Official Journal of the European Union (Legislative acts): Regulation (EU) 2016/679 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 27 April 2016 on the protection of natural persons with regard to the processing of personal data and on the free movement of such data, and repealing Directive 95/46/EC (General Data Protection Regulation) (April 27, 2016)
    Ken Mortensen

Presentation Material


  • Legal and Statutory Basis for Data Security
    Stephen Y. Chow
  • Creating and Maintaining an Information Security Program
    Jose Antonio Sesin
  • “New” Proposals for Identity Management
    Stephen Y. Chow
  • Privacy Lessons
    Josephine Cicchetti, Matthew F. Fitzsimmons, Debra Hampson
  • Digital Privacy Basics
    Todd Ruback
  • Internet/Digital Privacy
    Elaine C. Zacharakis
  • The FTC's Role in Privacy and Data Security
    Cathlin Tully
  • Advertising Law Foundations
    Rick Buck
  • Advertising Law Foundations: Key Areas of Engagement
    Tanya Madison
  • An Overview of Privacy Frameworks Outside the U.S.
    Kristen K. Hall, Peter F. McLaughlin, Ken Mortensen
Chairperson(s)
Ken Mortensen ~ Data Protection Officer, Global Trust & Privacy, Intersystems Corporation
Speaker(s)
Rick Buck ~ Senior Vice President, Privacy, Zeta Global
Stephen Y. Chow ~ Burns & Levinson LLP
Josephine Cicchetti ~ Carlton Fields Jorden Burt, P.A.
Joseph V. DeMarco ~ DeVore & DeMarco LLP
Matthew F. Fitzsimmons ~ U.S. Privacy Officer, Lead Cybersecurity Counsel, Cigna
Kristen K. Hall ~ Head of Privacy, Global Compliance and Risk Management, Shire
Debra Hampson ~ Chief Ethics and Privacy Officer and Managing Counsel, Cigna
Gary A. Kibel ~ Davis & Gilbert LLP
Jane Levine ~ EVP and Chief Global Compliance Counsel, Head of Government and Regulatory Affairs , Sotheby’s
Tanya Madison ~ Chief Privacy Counsel, TD Bank
Peter F. McLaughlin ~ Burns & Levinson LLP
Andy Roth ~ Cooley LLP
Todd Ruback ~ Chief Privacy Officer & VP of Legal Affairs, Evidon, Inc.
Urvashi Sen ~ Privacy Officer for Americas, HCL Technologies Ltd.
Jose Antonio Sesin ~ Agero, Inc.
Cathlin Tully ~ Attorney, Bureau of Consumer Protection, Division of Privacy and Identity Protection, Federal Trade Commission
Danny West ~ Counsel, Two Sigma Investments, LP
Elaine C. Zacharakis ~ Garfunkel Wild, P.C.
General credit information about this format appears below. For credit information specific to this program, please choose your jurisdiction(s) in the Credit Information box on the right-hand side of this page.

PLI’s live and on-demand webcasts are single-user license products intended for an individual registrant only. Credit will be issued only to the individual registered.


U.S. MCLE States

Alabama:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “online” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of online programs per reporting period.

Alaska:  All PLI products can fulfill Alaska’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Arizona:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “interactive CLE” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via interactive CLE programs.

Arkansas:  PLI’s on-demand web programs are not approved for Arkansas CLE credit.

California:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “participatory” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via participatory programs.

Colorado:  All PLI products can fulfill Colorado’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Connecticut: Effective January 1, 2017, all PLI products can fulfill Connecticut’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Delaware:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “eCLE” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of eCLE per reporting period, no more than 6 of which may be audio-only.

Florida:  All PLI products can fulfill Florida’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Georgia:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “in-house” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 in-house credits per reporting period.

Hawaii:  All PLI products can fulfill Hawaii’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Idaho:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 15 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Illinois:  All PLI products can fulfill Illinois' CLE requirements for experienced attorneys. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Indiana:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “distance education” credit. Attorneys are limited to 9 credits of distance education per reporting period.

Iowa:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “unmoderated” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of unmoderated programs per reporting period.

Kansas:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “prerecorded” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of prerecorded programs per reporting period.

Kentucky:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “non-live” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 non-live credits per reporting period.

Louisiana:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 4 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Maine:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 5.5 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Minnesota:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “on-demand” credit. Attorneys are limited to 15 on-demand credits per reporting period.

Mississippi:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “distance learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of distance learning per reporting period.

Missouri:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Montana:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 5 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Nebraska:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “computer-based learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 5 credits of computer-based learning per reporting period.

Nevada:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via self-study programs.

New Hampshire:  All PLI products can fulfill New Hampshire’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

New Jersey:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “alternative verifiable learning formats” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of alternative verifiable learning formats per reporting period.

New Mexico:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 4 credits of self-study per reporting period.

New York

Experienced Attorneys:  All PLI products can fulfill New York’s CLE requirements for experienced attorneys. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Newly Admitted Attorneys:  PLI’s transitional on-demand web programs can be used to fulfill the requirements for New York newly admitted attorneys. Only professional practice and law practice management credits may be earned via transitional on-demand web programs. Ethics and skills credits may not be earned via on-demand web programs.

North Carolina:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “online” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of online programs per reporting period.

North Dakota:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 15 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Ohio:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Oklahoma:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “online, on-demand” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of online, on-demand programs per reporting period.

Oregon:  All PLI products can fulfill Oregon’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Pennsylvania:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “distance learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of distance learning per reporting period.

Puerto Rico:  All PLI products can fulfill Puerto Rico’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Rhode Island:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “video replay” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 video replay credits per reporting period.

South Carolina:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “alternatively delivered” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of alternatively delivered programs per reporting period.

Tennessee:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “distance learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 8 credits of distance learning per reporting period.

Texas:  All PLI products can fulfill Texas’ CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Utah:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Vermont:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 10 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Virgin Islands:  All PLI products can fulfill the Virgin Islands’ CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Virginia:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “pre-recorded” credit. Attorneys are limited to 8 credits of pre-recorded programs per reporting period.

Washington:  All PLI products can fulfill Washington’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

West Virginia:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “online” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of online instruction per reporting period.

Wisconsin:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “repeated, on-demand” credit. Attorneys are limited to 15 credits of repeated, on-demand programs per reporting period. No ethics credits can be earned via on-demand web programs.

Wyoming:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of self-study per reporting period.


CPD Jurisdictions

British Columbia (CPD-BC):  PLI’s on-demand web programs are not eligible for CPD-BC credit unless viewed with at least one other attorney or an articled student. In this case, the credit must be recorded as a “study group.”

Ontario (CPD-ON):  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “recorded” credit. If viewed without a colleague, attorneys are limited to 6 credits of recorded programs per year. If viewed with at least one colleague, there is no limit to the number of credits that can be earned via recorded programs.

Quebec (CPD-QC):  PLI’s on-demand web programs can fulfill Quebec’s CPD requirements.

Hong Kong (CPD-HK):  PLI’s on-demand web programs are not approved for CPD-HK credit.

United Kingdom (CPD-UK):  PLI’s on-demand web programs can fulfill the United Kingdom’s CPD requirements.

Australia (CPD-AUS):  PLI’s on-demand web programs may fulfill Australia’s CPD requirements. Credit limits for on-demand web programs vary according to jurisdiction. Please refer to your jurisdiction’s CPD information page for specifics.

Alberta (CPD-ALBERTA):  All PLI products can fulfill Alberta’s CPD requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Dubai (CLPD-DUBAI):  PLI’s on-demand web programs may fulfill CLPD credit requirements.


Other Credit Types

CPE Credit (NASBA):  Select on-demand web programs qualify as the “QAS Self-Study” delivery method. Please check the Credit Information box on the right-hand side of this page to verify CPE credit availability.

IRS Continuing Education (IRS-CE):  PLI’s on-demand web programs may fulfill IRS-CE requirements. To request IRS-CE credit, please notify PLI at plicredits@pli.edu of your request and include your Preparer Tax Identification Number (PTIN).

Certified Fraud Examiner CPE:  PLI’s on-demand web programs may fulfill Certified Fraud Examiner CPE requirements. To request CPE credit or find out which programs offer CPE, please contact PLI at plicredits@pli.edu.

IAPP Continuing Privacy Credit (CPE):  PLI’s on-demand web programs may fulfill Privacy CPE credit requirements.

HR Recertification (HRCI):  PLI’s on-demand web programs may fulfill HR credit requirements.

SHRM Recertification (SHRM):  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as "self-paced" credit. SHRM professionals are limited to 30 credits of self-paced programs per recertification period.

Compliance Certification Board (CCB):  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Candidates are limited to 10 self-study credits per 12-month period, and certification holders are limited to 20 self-study credits per 2-year renewal period.

Certified Anti-Money Laundering Specialists Certification (CAMS):  PLI’s on-demand web programs are not approved for CAMS credit.

New York State Social Worker Continuing Education (SW CPE):  PLI’s on-demand web programs are not approved for SW CPE credit.

American Bankers Association Professional Certification (ABA):  PLI’s on-demand web programs may fulfill ABA credit requirements.

Certified Financial Planners (CFP):  PLI’s on-demand web programs are not approved for CFP credit.

 

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