Seminar  Program

Antitrust Counseling & Compliance 2018


Select a Location:

Why You Should Attend

Lawyers counseling businesses should have a solid foundation in the principles of antitrust law and an understanding of the latest antitrust developments in order to advise their clients effectively. The consequences of running afoul of antitrust rules can be costly: federal and state government enforcement actions, jail time for executives, treble damages litigation, class actions, and adverse publicity are all risks when companies step over the line. Do you have the tools needed to help your clients avoid making costly mistakes without stopping them from engaging in lawful activity, so that they can accomplish their business goals? Attend this program and learn when to say “no” and when to say “yes” and how to provide practical answers to the antitrust questions your clients will ask.

 

What You Will Learn

  1. What are the Trump Administration’s antitrust enforcement priorities? What do Trump’s appointments to the DOJ and FTC tell us about future enforcement?
  2. Will the state attorneys general step up enforcement to replace federal enforcement?
  3. When are bundled prices, loyalty discounts and exclusive dealing acceptable and when are they problematic? What about tying?
  4. When can you expect the Trump Administration, the DOJ or FTC to block a proposed merger? What leads the government to investigate non-reportable deals? What can we learn from the recent FTC appellate wins in FTC v. Advocate Health Care Network and FTC v. Penn State Hershey Medical Center as well as DOJ trial court victories in United States v. Aetna and United States v. Anthem?
  5. How can you avoid antitrust risk in intellectual property licenses? What do you need to know when participating in industry standard setting or licensing “standards essential patents”? Are NPEs (non-practicing entities) at risk of violating antitrust law? When are patent acquisitions at risk? How are the lower courts ruling on settlements of patent litigation after the Supreme Court decision in FTC v. Actavis?
  6. What do you need to know about competition law enforcement outside the U.S.? How much do you need to worry about enforcement in the BRIC countries (Brazil, Russia, India and China) as well as the EU? What does Brexit mean for competition enforcement in the EU and UK?
  7. What do you do if you learn about price fixing at your company? When is it wise to self-report and seek leniency? Is extradition to the U.S. and jail time for foreign executives a real risk?

 

Special Features

Earn one hour of Ethics credit

 

Who Should Attend

This program is intended for in-house corporate counsel, attorneys in government and private practice, and other allied professionals with responsibility for, or interest in, antitrust matters.


PLI Group Discounts

Groups of 4-14 from the same organization, all registering at the same time, for a PLI program scheduled for presentation at the same site, are entitled to receive a group discount. For further discount information, please contact membership@pli.edu or call (800) 260-4PLI.

PLI Can Arrange Group Viewing to Your Firm

Contact the Groupcasts Department via email at groupcasts@pli.edu for more details.

Cancellations

All cancellations received 3 business days prior to the program will be refunded 100%. If you do not cancel within the allotted time period, payment is due in full. You may substitute another individual to attend the program at any time.

9:00 Opening Remarks
Speakers: M. Howard Morse
9:15 Marketing and Distribution Issues in Antitrust Law

Vertical Restraints

  • Overview of antitrust laws applying to marketing and distribution 
  • When are vertical restraints problematic? 
  • Important vertical restraints cases 
  • Treatment of vertical restraints in the EU 

Lisl J. Dunlop

Pricing Issues

  • Resale price maintenance and minimum advertised price (MAP) programs 
  • Pricing conduct in online retailing
  • Price discrimination and discriminatory provisions of promotional funds and services
  • Constraints on pricing conduct outside the U.S.

Alicia L. Downey

 


10:45 Networking Break

11:00 IP Licensing and Antitrust Considerations
  • Are there antitrust limitations on an IP owner’s right to refuse to license?
  • In what situations do restrictions in licensing agreements raise antitrust concern?
  • What are the antitrust implications of the Supreme Court’s 2017 Lexmark decision?
  • Is patent hold-up a real problem and, if so, are FRAND commitments an effective remedy?
  • When, if ever, does a request for injunctive relief or exclusion orders for FRAND-encumbered patents give rise to an antitrust claim?
  • What do the lower court decisions after FTC v. Actavis teach us about what is lawful in pharmaceutical patent settlements?
  • Are the rules different in Europe, China and the rest of the world?
Speakers: Paul H. Saint-Antoine

12:00 Lunch

1:00 Antitrust Issues in Mergers and Acquisitions

The Merger Review Process

  • Negotiating antitrust risk shifting provisions in merger agreements
  • Making sense of complicated HSR rules 
  • Coordinating global competition filings
  • Strategies to get a deal through without a Second Request
  • Avoiding “gun jumping” while preparing to integrate 

Merger Guidelines and Enforcement Trends

  • Horizontal merger analysis
  • Merger enforcement trends
  • Focus on innovation markets and vertical mergers
  • Learning from recently litigated cases:  US v. AT&T/Time Warner, FTC v. Trinox/Cristal 
  • Negotiating remedies 


 
Speakers: M. Howard Morse

2:00 Federal and State Antitrust Enforcement
• Enforcement priorities in the Trump Administration and the States
• Recent developments in enforcement 
• The role of FTC Section 5
• The approach to resale price maintenance among the states
 
Speakers: Elinor R. Hoffmann

3:00 Networking Break

3:15 Competition Law Compliance from an In-House Perspective
• Global competition law environment
• Goals and elements of a successful competition law compliance program
• Importance of a global program for global operations
• Potential risk areas
 
Speakers: Gail Levine

4:15 Ethics for Antitrust Attorneys
• How to avoid ethical problems as they relate to organizational clients, joint representation, contacting former employees and the in house lawyer. 
• Special ethical considerations in litigation and government investigations, including joint defense agreements, e-discovery, spoliation, social media, outsourcing, witness coaching and media commentary.
 
Speakers: Lisa C. Wood

5:15 Adjourn

Chairperson(s)
M. Howard Morse ~ Cooley LLP
Speaker(s)
Alicia L. Downey ~ Downey Law LLC
Lisl J. Dunlop ~ Manatt, Phelps & Phillips, LLP
Elinor R. Hoffmann ~ Deputy Chief, Antitrust Bureau; Special Counsel, Economic Justice Division, New York Office of the Attorney General
Gail Levine ~ Director II, Uber Techologies Inc.
Paul H. Saint-Antoine ~ Drinker Biddle & Reath LLP
Lisa C. Wood ~ Foley Hoag LLP
Program Attorney(s)
Krista M. Gundersen ~ Director, Programs, Practising Law Institute

New York City Seminar Location

PLI New York Center
, 1177 Avenue of the Americas, (2nd floor), entrance on 45th Street, New York, New York 10036. (800) 260-4754.

New York City Hotel Accommodations

Crowne Plaza Times Square Manhattan, 1605 Broadway (48th Street), New York, NY 10019 (212) 977-4000. When calling, mention Practising Law Institute. You can also make reservations online to access PLI's rates.

The Muse, 130 West 46th Street, New York, NY 10036. Please call reservations at 1-800-546-7866. When calling, please mention Practising Law Institute and Corporate Rate ID 786839408. In addition, you can book online at PLI Muse Hotel

Millennium Broadway Hotel, 145 West 44th Street, New York, NY 10036. Please call reservations at 1-800-622-5569. When calling, please mention Practising Law Institute. In addition, you can book online at PLI Millennium Hotel .

 Hyatt Times Square, 135 W. 45th Street, New York, NY 10036. For reservations, please call (646) 364-1234. When calling mention rate code CR56218 or Practising Law Institute.

General credit information about this format appears below. For credit information specific to this program, please choose your jurisdiction(s) in the Credit Information box on the right-hand side of this page.


U.S. MCLE States

Alabama: PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Alaska:  All PLI products can fulfill Alaska’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Arizona:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “interactive CLE” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via interactive CLE programs.

Arkansas:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

California:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “participatory” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via participatory programs.

Colorado:  All PLI products can fulfill Colorado’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Connecticut: Effective January 1, 2017, all PLI products can fulfill Connecticut’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Delaware:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Florida:  All PLI products can fulfill Florida’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Georgia:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Hawaii:  All PLI products can fulfill Hawaii’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Idaho:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Illinois: All PLI products can fulfill Illinois' CLE requirements for experienced attorneys. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Indiana:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Iowa:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Kansas:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live programs.

Kentucky:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Louisiana:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Maine:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Minnesota:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Mississippi:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Missouri:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Montana:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Nebraska:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Nevada:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

New Hampshire:  All PLI products can fulfill New Hampshire’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

New Jersey:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

New Mexico:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

New York

Experienced Attorneys:  All PLI products can fulfill New York’s CLE requirements for experienced attorneys. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Newly Admitted Attorneys:  PLI’s transitional live seminars can be used to fulfill the requirements for newly admitted attorneys. All credit categories may be earned via transitional live seminars.

North Carolina:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars

North Dakota:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Ohio:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Oklahoma:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Oregon:  All PLI products can fulfill Oregon’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Pennsylvania: PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Puerto Rico:  All PLI products can fulfill Puerto Rico’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Rhode Island:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

South Carolina:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Tennessee:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Texas:  All PLI products can fulfill Texas’ CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Utah:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Vermont:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Virgin Islands:  All PLI products can fulfill the Virgin Islands’ CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Virginia:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live interactive” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live interactive programs.

Washington:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

West Virginia:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Wisconsin:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Wyoming:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

CPD Jurisdictions

British Columbia (CPD-BC):  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “real-time” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via real-time programs.

Ontario (CPD-ON):  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “interactive” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via interactive programs.

Quebec (CPD-QC): PLI’s live seminars can fulfill Quebec’s CPD requirements.

Hong Kong (CPD-HK):  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of points an attorney can earn via live seminars.

United Kingdom (CPD-UK):  PLI’s live seminars can fulfill the United Kingdom’s CPD requirements.

Australia (CPD-AUS):  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit in all Australian jurisdictions. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Alberta (CPD-ALBERTA):  All PLI products can fulfill Alberta’s CPD requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Dubai (CLPD-DUBAI):  PLI’s live seminars may fulfill CLPD credit requirements.

Other Credit Types

CPE Credit (NASBA): PLI’s live seminars qualify as the “Group-Live” delivery method. Please check the Credit Information box on the right-hand side of this page to verify CPE credit availability.

IRS Continuing Education (IRS-CE): PLI’s live seminars may fulfill IRS-CE requirements. To request IRS-CE credit, please notify PLI at plicredits@pli.edu of your request and include your Preparer Tax Identification Number (PTIN).

Certified Fraud Examiner CPE:  PLI’s live seminars may fulfill Certified Fraud Examiner CPE requirements. To request CPE credit or find out which programs offer CPE, please contact PLI at plicredits@pli.edu.

IAPP Continuing Privacy Credit (CPE):  PLI’s live seminars may fulfill Privacy CPE credit requirements.

HR Recertification (HRCI):  PLI’s live seminars may fulfill HR credit requirements.

SHRM Recertification (SHRM):  PLI’s live seminars qualify as "instructor-led" credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an SHRM professional can earn via instructor-led programs.

Compliance Certification Board (CCB):  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” training events. There is no limit to the number of credits a candidate or certification holder can earn via live programs.

Certified Anti-Money Laundering Specialists (CAMS):  PLI’s live seminars may fulfill CAMS credit requirements.

New York State Social Worker Continuing Education (SW CPE):  PLI’s live seminars may fulfill SW CPE credit requirements.

American Bankers Association Professional Certification (ABA):  PLI’s live seminars may fulfill ABA credit requirements.

Certified Financial Planners (CFP):  PLI’s live seminars may fulfill CFP credit requirements.

 

Why You Should Attend

Lawyers counseling businesses should have a solid foundation in the principles of antitrust law and an understanding of the latest antitrust developments in order to advise their clients effectively. The consequences of running afoul of antitrust rules can be costly: federal and state government enforcement actions, jail time for executives, treble damages litigation, class actions, and adverse publicity are all risks when companies step over the line. Do you have the tools needed to help your clients avoid making costly mistakes without stopping them from engaging in lawful activity, so that they can accomplish their business goals? Attend this program and learn when to say “no” and when to say “yes” and how to provide practical answers to the antitrust questions your clients will ask.

 

What You Will Learn

  1. What are the Trump Administration’s antitrust enforcement priorities? What do Trump’s appointments to the DOJ and FTC tell us about future enforcement?
  2. Will the state attorneys general step up enforcement to replace federal enforcement?
  3. When are bundled prices, loyalty discounts and exclusive dealing acceptable and when are they problematic? What about tying?
  4. When can you expect the Trump Administration, the DOJ or FTC to block a proposed merger? What leads the government to investigate non-reportable deals? What can we learn from the recent FTC appellate wins in FTC v. Advocate Health Care Network and FTC v. Penn State Hershey Medical Center as well as DOJ trial court victories in United States v. Aetna and United States v. Anthem?
  5. How can you avoid antitrust risk in intellectual property licenses? What do you need to know when participating in industry standard setting or licensing “standards essential patents”? Are NPEs (non-practicing entities) at risk of violating antitrust law? When are patent acquisitions at risk? How are the lower courts ruling on settlements of patent litigation after the Supreme Court decision in FTC v. Actavis?
  6. What do you need to know about competition law enforcement outside the U.S.? How much do you need to worry about enforcement in the BRIC countries (Brazil, Russia, India and China) as well as the EU? What does Brexit mean for competition enforcement in the EU and UK?
  7. What do you do if you learn about price fixing at your company? When is it wise to self-report and seek leniency? Is extradition to the U.S. and jail time for foreign executives a real risk?

 

Special Features

Earn one hour of Ethics credit

 

Who Should Attend

This program is intended for in-house corporate counsel, attorneys in government and private practice, and other allied professionals with responsibility for, or interest in, antitrust matters.


PLI Group Discounts

Groups of 4-14 from the same organization, all registering at the same time, for a PLI program scheduled for presentation at the same site, are entitled to receive a group discount. For further discount information, please contact membership@pli.edu or call (800) 260-4PLI.

PLI Can Arrange Group Viewing to Your Firm

Contact the Groupcasts Department via email at groupcasts@pli.edu for more details.

Cancellations

All cancellations received 3 business days prior to the program will be refunded 100%. If you do not cancel within the allotted time period, payment is due in full. You may substitute another individual to attend the program at any time.

9:00 Opening Remarks
Speakers: M. Howard Morse
9:15 Marketing and Distribution Issues in Antitrust Law

Vertical Restraints

  • Overview of antitrust laws applying to marketing and distribution 
  • When are vertical restraints problematic? 
  • Important vertical restraints cases 
  • Treatment of vertical restraints in the EU 

Lisl J. Dunlop

Pricing Issues

  • Resale price maintenance and minimum advertised price (MAP) programs 
  • Pricing conduct in online retailing
  • Price discrimination and discriminatory provisions of promotional funds and services
  • Constraints on pricing conduct outside the U.S.

Alicia L. Downey

 


10:45 Networking Break

11:00 IP Licensing and Antitrust Considerations
  • Are there antitrust limitations on an IP owner’s right to refuse to license?
  • In what situations do restrictions in licensing agreements raise antitrust concern?
  • What are the antitrust implications of the Supreme Court’s 2017 Lexmark decision?
  • Is patent hold-up a real problem and, if so, are FRAND commitments an effective remedy?
  • When, if ever, does a request for injunctive relief or exclusion orders for FRAND-encumbered patents give rise to an antitrust claim?
  • What do the lower court decisions after FTC v. Actavis teach us about what is lawful in pharmaceutical patent settlements?
  • Are the rules different in Europe, China and the rest of the world?
Speakers: Paul H. Saint-Antoine

12:00 Lunch

1:00 Antitrust Issues in Mergers and Acquisitions

The Merger Review Process

  • Negotiating antitrust risk shifting provisions in merger agreements
  • Making sense of complicated HSR rules 
  • Coordinating global competition filings
  • Strategies to get a deal through without a Second Request
  • Avoiding “gun jumping” while preparing to integrate 

Merger Guidelines and Enforcement Trends

  • Horizontal merger analysis
  • Merger enforcement trends
  • Focus on innovation markets and vertical mergers
  • Learning from recently litigated cases:  US v. AT&T/Time Warner, FTC v. Trinox/Cristal 
  • Negotiating remedies 


 
Speakers: M. Howard Morse

2:00 Federal and State Antitrust Enforcement
• Enforcement priorities in the Trump Administration and the States
• Recent developments in enforcement 
• The role of FTC Section 5
• The approach to resale price maintenance among the states
 
Speakers: Elinor R. Hoffmann

3:00 Networking Break

3:15 Competition Law Compliance from an In-House Perspective
• Global competition law environment
• Goals and elements of a successful competition law compliance program
• Importance of a global program for global operations
• Potential risk areas
 
Speakers: Gail Levine

4:15 Ethics for Antitrust Attorneys
• How to avoid ethical problems as they relate to organizational clients, joint representation, contacting former employees and the in house lawyer. 
• Special ethical considerations in litigation and government investigations, including joint defense agreements, e-discovery, spoliation, social media, outsourcing, witness coaching and media commentary.
 
Speakers: Lisa C. Wood

5:15 Adjourn

Chairperson(s)
M. Howard Morse ~ Cooley LLP
Speaker(s)
Alicia L. Downey ~ Downey Law LLC
Lisl J. Dunlop ~ Manatt, Phelps & Phillips, LLP
Elinor R. Hoffmann ~ Deputy Chief, Antitrust Bureau; Special Counsel, Economic Justice Division, New York Office of the Attorney General
Gail Levine ~ Director II, Uber Techologies Inc.
Paul H. Saint-Antoine ~ Drinker Biddle & Reath LLP
Lisa C. Wood ~ Foley Hoag LLP
Program Attorney(s)
Krista M. Gundersen ~ Director, Programs, Practising Law Institute
General credit information about this format appears below. For credit information specific to this program, please choose your jurisdiction(s) in the Credit Information box on the right-hand side of this page.

PLI’s live and on-demand webcasts are single-user license products intended for an individual registrant only. Credit will be issued only to the individual registered. If two or more individuals wish to participate in a webcast and receive credit, PLI would be happy to provide a Groupcast – group viewing of a webcast. To schedule a Groupcast, please contact PLI at groupcasts@pli.edu.


U.S. MCLE States

Alabama:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Alaska:  All PLI products can fulfill Alaska’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Arizona:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “interactive CLE” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via interactive CLE programs.

Arkansas:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

California:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “participatory” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via participatory programs.

Colorado:  All PLI products can fulfill Colorado’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Connecticut: Effective January 1, 2017, all PLI products can fulfill Connecticut’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Delaware:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “eCLE” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of eCLE per reporting period.

Florida:  All PLI products can fulfill Florida’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Georgia:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “in-house” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 in-house credits per reporting period.

Hawaii:  All PLI products can fulfill Hawaii’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Idaho:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Illinois:  All PLI products can fulfill Illinois' CLE requirements for experienced attorneys. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Indiana:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “distance education” credit. Attorneys are limited to 9 credits of distance education per reporting period.

Iowa:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Kansas:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Kentucky:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Louisiana:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 4 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Maine:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Minnesota:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Mississippi:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “distance learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of distance learning per reporting period.

Missouri:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Montana:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Nebraska:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “computer-based learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 5 credits of computer-based learning per reporting period.

Nevada:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

New Hampshire:  All PLI products can fulfill New Hampshire’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

New Jersey:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “alternative verifiable learning formats” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of alternative verifiable learning formats per reporting period.

New Mexico:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

New York

Experienced Attorneys:  All PLI products can fulfill New York’s CLE requirements for experienced attorneys. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Newly Admitted Attorneys:  PLI’s transitional live webcasts can be used to fulfill the requirements for New York newly admitted attorneys. Ethics credit, professional practice credit, and law practice management credit may be earned via transitional live webcasts. Skills credits may not be earned via live webcasts.

North Carolina:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

North Dakota:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Ohio:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Oklahoma:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Oregon:  All PLI products can fulfill Oregon’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Pennsylvania:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “distance learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of distance learning per reporting period.

Puerto Rico:  All PLI products can fulfill Puerto Rico’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Rhode Island:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

South Carolina:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “alternatively delivered” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of alternatively delivered programs per reporting period.

Tennessee:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “distance learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 8 credits of distance learning per reporting period.

Texas:  All PLI products can fulfill Texas’ CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Utah:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Vermont:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Virgin Islands:  All PLI products can fulfill the Virgin Islands’ CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Virginia:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live interactive” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live interactive programs.

Washington:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

West Virginia:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “online” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of online instruction per reporting period.

Wisconsin:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Wyoming:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

CPD Jurisdictions

British Columbia (CPD-BC):  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “real-time” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via real-time programs.

Ontario (CPD-ON):  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “interactive” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via interactive programs.

Quebec (CPD-QC):  PLI’s live webcasts can fulfill Quebec’s CPD requirements.

Hong Kong (CPD-HK):  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “distance learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 15 points of distance learning programs per reporting period.

United Kingdom (CPD-UK):  PLI’s live webcasts can fulfill the United Kingdom’s CPD requirements.

Australia (CPD-AUS):  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill Australia’s CPD requirements. Credit limits for live webcasts vary according to jurisdiction. Please refer to your jurisdiction’s CPD information page for specifics.

Alberta (CPD-ALBERTA):  All PLI products can fulfill Alberta’s CPD requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Dubai (CLPD-DUBAI):  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill CLPD credit requirements.

Other Credit Types

CPE Credit (NASBA):  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as the “Group-Internet-Based” (GIB) delivery method. Please check the Credit Information box on the right-hand side of this page to verify CPE credit availability.

IRS Continuing Education (IRS-CE):  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill IRS-CE requirements. To request IRS-CE credit, please notify PLI at plicredits@pli.edu of your request and include your Preparer Tax Identification Number (PTIN).

Certified Fraud Examiner CPE:  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill Certified Fraud Examiner CPE requirements. To request CPE credit or find out which programs offer CPE, please contact PLI at plicredits@pli.edu.

IAPP Continuing Privacy Credit (CPE):  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill Privacy CPE credit requirements.

HR Recertification (HRCI):  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill HR credit requirements.

SHRM Recertification (SHRM):  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as "instructor-led" credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an SHRM professional can earn via instructor-led programs.

Compliance Certification Board (CCB):  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” training events. There is no limit to the number of credits a candidate or certification holder can earn via live programs.

Certified Anti-Money Laundering Specialists (CAMS):  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill CAMS credit requirements.

New York State Social Worker Continuing Education (SW CPE):  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill SW CPE credit requirements.

American Bankers Association Professional Certification (ABA):  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill ABA credit requirements.

Certified Financial Planners (CFP):  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill CFP credit requirements.

 

Why You Should Attend

Lawyers counseling businesses should have a solid foundation in the principles of antitrust law and an understanding of the latest antitrust developments in order to advise their clients effectively. The consequences of running afoul of antitrust rules can be costly: federal and state government enforcement actions, jail time for executives, treble damages litigation, class actions, and adverse publicity are all risks when companies step over the line. Do you have the tools needed to help your clients avoid making costly mistakes without stopping them from engaging in lawful activity, so that they can accomplish their business goals? Attend this program and learn when to say “no” and when to say “yes” and how to provide practical answers to the antitrust questions your clients will ask.

 

What You Will Learn

  1. What are the Trump Administration’s antitrust enforcement priorities? What do Trump’s appointments to the DOJ and FTC tell us about future enforcement?
  2. Will the state attorneys general step up enforcement to replace federal enforcement?
  3. When are bundled prices, loyalty discounts and exclusive dealing acceptable and when are they problematic? What about tying?
  4. When can you expect the Trump Administration, the DOJ or FTC to block a proposed merger? What leads the government to investigate non-reportable deals? What can we learn from the recent FTC appellate wins in FTC v. Advocate Health Care Network and FTC v. Penn State Hershey Medical Center as well as DOJ trial court victories in United States v. Aetna and United States v. Anthem?
  5. How can you avoid antitrust risk in intellectual property licenses? What do you need to know when participating in industry standard setting or licensing “standards essential patents”? Are NPEs (non-practicing entities) at risk of violating antitrust law? When are patent acquisitions at risk? How are the lower courts ruling on settlements of patent litigation after the Supreme Court decision in FTC v. Actavis?
  6. What do you need to know about competition law enforcement outside the U.S.? How much do you need to worry about enforcement in the BRIC countries (Brazil, Russia, India and China) as well as the EU? What does Brexit mean for competition enforcement in the EU and UK?
  7. What do you do if you learn about price fixing at your company? When is it wise to self-report and seek leniency? Is extradition to the U.S. and jail time for foreign executives a real risk?

 

Special Features

Earn one hour of Ethics credit

 

Who Should Attend

This program is intended for in-house corporate counsel, attorneys in government and private practice, and other allied professionals with responsibility for, or interest in, antitrust matters.


PLI Group Discounts

Groups of 4-14 from the same organization, all registering at the same time, for a PLI program scheduled for presentation at the same site, are entitled to receive a group discount. For further discount information, please contact membership@pli.edu or call (800) 260-4PLI.

PLI Can Arrange Group Viewing to Your Firm

Contact the Groupcasts Department via email at groupcasts@pli.edu for more details.

Cancellations

All cancellations received 3 business days prior to the program will be refunded 100%. If you do not cancel within the allotted time period, payment is due in full. You may substitute another individual to attend the program at any time.

9:00 Opening Remarks
Speakers: M. Howard Morse
9:15 Marketing and Distribution Issues in Antitrust Law

Vertical Restraints

  • Overview of antitrust laws applying to marketing and distribution 
  • When are vertical restraints problematic? 
  • Important vertical restraints cases 
  • Treatment of vertical restraints in the EU 

Lisl J. Dunlop

Pricing Issues

  • Resale price maintenance and minimum advertised price (MAP) programs 
  • Pricing conduct in online retailing
  • Price discrimination and discriminatory provisions of promotional funds and services
  • Constraints on pricing conduct outside the U.S.

Alicia L. Downey

 


10:45 Networking Break

11:00 IP Licensing and Antitrust Considerations
  • Are there antitrust limitations on an IP owner’s right to refuse to license?
  • In what situations do restrictions in licensing agreements raise antitrust concern?
  • What are the antitrust implications of the Supreme Court’s 2017 Lexmark decision?
  • Is patent hold-up a real problem and, if so, are FRAND commitments an effective remedy?
  • When, if ever, does a request for injunctive relief or exclusion orders for FRAND-encumbered patents give rise to an antitrust claim?
  • What do the lower court decisions after FTC v. Actavis teach us about what is lawful in pharmaceutical patent settlements?
  • Are the rules different in Europe, China and the rest of the world?
Speakers: Paul H. Saint-Antoine

12:00 Lunch

1:00 Antitrust Issues in Mergers and Acquisitions

The Merger Review Process

  • Negotiating antitrust risk shifting provisions in merger agreements
  • Making sense of complicated HSR rules 
  • Coordinating global competition filings
  • Strategies to get a deal through without a Second Request
  • Avoiding “gun jumping” while preparing to integrate 

Merger Guidelines and Enforcement Trends

  • Horizontal merger analysis
  • Merger enforcement trends
  • Focus on innovation markets and vertical mergers
  • Learning from recently litigated cases:  US v. AT&T/Time Warner, FTC v. Trinox/Cristal 
  • Negotiating remedies 


 
Speakers: M. Howard Morse

2:00 Federal and State Antitrust Enforcement
• Enforcement priorities in the Trump Administration and the States
• Recent developments in enforcement 
• The role of FTC Section 5
• The approach to resale price maintenance among the states
 
Speakers: Elinor R. Hoffmann

3:00 Networking Break

3:15 Competition Law Compliance from an In-House Perspective
• Global competition law environment
• Goals and elements of a successful competition law compliance program
• Importance of a global program for global operations
• Potential risk areas
 
Speakers: Gail Levine

4:15 Ethics for Antitrust Attorneys
• How to avoid ethical problems as they relate to organizational clients, joint representation, contacting former employees and the in house lawyer. 
• Special ethical considerations in litigation and government investigations, including joint defense agreements, e-discovery, spoliation, social media, outsourcing, witness coaching and media commentary.
 
Speakers: Lisa C. Wood

5:15 Adjourn

Chairperson(s)
M. Howard Morse ~ Cooley LLP
Speaker(s)
Alicia L. Downey ~ Downey Law LLC
Lisl J. Dunlop ~ Manatt, Phelps & Phillips, LLP
Elinor R. Hoffmann ~ Deputy Chief, Antitrust Bureau; Special Counsel, Economic Justice Division, New York Office of the Attorney General
Gail Levine ~ Director II, Uber Techologies Inc.
Paul H. Saint-Antoine ~ Drinker Biddle & Reath LLP
Lisa C. Wood ~ Foley Hoag LLP
Program Attorney(s)
Krista M. Gundersen ~ Director, Programs, Practising Law Institute
Cleveland Groupcast Location

The Cleveland Metropolitan Bar Association, 1375 E. 9th Street – Floor 2, Cleveland, Ohio 44114. 216-696-2404.

General credit information about this format appears below. For credit information specific to this program, please choose your jurisdiction(s) in the Credit Information box on the right-hand side of this page.


U.S. MCLE States

Alabama:  PLI’s live groupcasts (i.e. live webcasts available for group viewing at co-sponsored locations) qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live groupcasts.

Alaska:  All PLI products can fulfill Alaska’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Arizona:  PLI’s live groupcasts (i.e. live webcasts available for group viewing at co-sponsored locations) qualify as “interactive CLE” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via interactive CLE programs.

Arkansas:  PLI’s live groupcasts (i.e. live webcasts available for group viewing at co-sponsored locations) qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live groupcasts.

California:  PLI’s live groupcasts (i.e. live webcasts available for group viewing at co-sponsored locations) qualify as “participatory” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via participatory programs.

Colorado:  All PLI products can fulfill Colorado’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Connecticut: Effective January 1, 2017, all PLI products can fulfill Connecticut’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Delaware:  PLI’s live groupcasts (i.e. live webcasts available for group viewing at co-sponsored locations) qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live groupcasts.

Florida:  All PLI products can fulfill Florida’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Georgia:  PLI’s live groupcasts (i.e. live webcasts available for group viewing at co-sponsored locations) qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live groupcasts.

Hawaii:  All PLI products can fulfill Hawaii’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Idaho:  PLI’s live groupcasts (i.e. live webcasts available for group viewing at co-sponsored locations) qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live groupcasts.

Illinois:  All PLI products can fulfill Illinois' CLE requirements for experienced attorneys. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Indiana:  PLI’s live groupcasts (i.e. live webcasts available for group viewing at co-sponsored locations) qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live groupcasts.

Iowa:  PLI’s live groupcasts (i.e. live webcasts available for group viewing at co-sponsored locations) qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live groupcasts.

Kansas:  PLI’s live groupcasts (i.e. live webcasts available for group viewing at co-sponsored locations) qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live programs.

Kentucky:  PLI’s live groupcasts (i.e. live webcasts available for group viewing at co-sponsored locations) qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live groupcasts.

Louisiana:  PLI’s live groupcasts (i.e. live webcasts available for group viewing at co-sponsored locations) qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live groupcasts.

Maine:  PLI’s live groupcasts (i.e. live webcasts available for group viewing at co-sponsored locations) qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live groupcasts.

Minnesota:  PLI’s live groupcasts (i.e. live webcasts available for group viewing at co-sponsored locations) qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live groupcasts.

Mississippi:  PLI’s live groupcasts (i.e. live webcasts available for group viewing at co-sponsored locations) qualify as “distance learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of distance learning per reporting period.

Missouri:  PLI’s live groupcasts (i.e. live webcasts available for group viewing at co-sponsored locations) qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live groupcasts.

Montana:  PLI’s live groupcasts (i.e. live webcasts available for group viewing at co-sponsored locations) qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live groupcasts.

Nebraska:  PLI’s live groupcasts (i.e. live webcasts available for group viewing at co-sponsored locations) qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live groupcasts.

Nevada:  PLI’s live groupcasts (i.e. live webcasts available for group viewing at co-sponsored locations) qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live groupcasts.

New Hampshire:  All PLI products can fulfill New Hampshire’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

New Jersey:  PLI’s live groupcasts (i.e. live webcasts available for group viewing at co-sponsored locations) qualify as “alternative verifiable learning formats” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of alternative verifiable learning formats per reporting period.

New Mexico:  PLI’s live groupcasts (i.e. live webcasts available for group viewing at co-sponsored locations) qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live groupcasts.

New York

Experienced Attorneys:  All PLI products can fulfill New York’s CLE requirements for experienced attorneys. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Newly Admitted Attorneys:  PLI’s transitional live groupcasts (i.e. live webcasts available for group viewing at co-sponsored locations) can be used to fulfill the requirements for New York newly admitted attorneys. Ethics credit, professional practice credit, and law practice management credit may be earned via transitional live groupcasts. Skills credits may not be earned via live groupcasts.

North Carolina:  PLI’s live groupcasts (i.e. live webcasts available for group viewing at co-sponsored locations) qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live groupcasts.

North Dakota:  PLI’s live groupcasts (i.e. live webcasts available for group viewing at co-sponsored locations) qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live groupcasts.

Ohio:  PLI’s live groupcasts (i.e. live webcasts available for group viewing at co-sponsored locations) qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live groupcasts.

Oklahoma:  PLI’s live groupcasts (i.e. live webcasts available for group viewing at co-sponsored locations) qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live groupcasts.

Oregon:  All PLI products can fulfill Oregon’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Pennsylvania:  PLI’s live groupcasts (i.e. live webcasts available for group viewing at co-sponsored locations) qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live groupcasts.

Puerto Rico:  All PLI products can fulfill Puerto Rico’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Rhode Island:  PLI’s live groupcasts (i.e. live webcasts available for group viewing at co-sponsored locations) qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live groupcasts.

South Carolina:  PLI’s live groupcasts (i.e. live webcasts available for group viewing at co-sponsored locations) qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live groupcasts.

Tennessee:  PLI’s live groupcasts (i.e. live webcasts available for group viewing at co-sponsored locations) qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live groupcasts.

Texas:  All PLI products can fulfill Texas’ CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Utah:  PLI’s live groupcasts (i.e. live webcasts available for group viewing at co-sponsored locations) qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Vermont:  PLI’s live groupcasts (i.e. live webcasts available for group viewing at co-sponsored locations) qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live groupcasts.

Virgin Islands:  All PLI products can fulfill the Virgin Islands’ CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Virginia:  PLI’s live groupcasts (i.e. live webcasts available for group viewing at co-sponsored locations) qualify as “live interactive” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live interactive programs.

Washington:  PLI’s live groupcasts (i.e. live webcasts available for group viewing at co-sponsored locations) qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live groupcasts.

West Virginia:  PLI’s live groupcasts (i.e. live webcasts available for group viewing at co-sponsored locations) qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live groupcasts.

Wisconsin:  PLI’s live groupcasts (i.e. live webcasts available for group viewing at co-sponsored locations) qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live groupcasts.

Wyoming:  PLI’s live groupcasts (i.e. live webcasts available for group viewing at co-sponsored locations) qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live groupcasts.


CPD Jurisdictions

British Columbia (CPD-BC):  PLI’s live groupcasts (i.e. live webcasts available for group viewing at co-sponsored locations) qualify as “real-time” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via real-time programs.

Ontario (CPD-ON):  PLI’s live groupcasts (i.e. live webcasts available for group viewing at co-sponsored locations) qualify as “interactive” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via interactive programs.

Quebec (CPD-QC):  PLI’s live groupcasts (i.e. live webcasts available for group viewing at co-sponsored locations) can fulfill Quebec’s CPD requirements.

Hong Kong (CPD-HK):  PLI’s live groupcasts (i.e. live webcasts available for group viewing at co-sponsored locations) qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of points an attorney can earn via live groupcasts.

United Kingdom (CPD-UK):  PLI’s live groupcasts (i.e. live webcasts available for group viewing at co-sponsored locations) can fulfill the United Kingdom’s CPD requirements.

Australia (CPD-AUS):  PLI’s live groupcasts (i.e. live webcasts available for group viewing at co-sponsored locations) may fulfill Australia’s CPD requirements. Credit limits for live groupcasts vary according to jurisdiction. Please refer to your jurisdiction’s CPD information page for specifics.

Alberta (CPD-ALBERTA):  All PLI products can fulfill Alberta’s CPD requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Dubai (CLPD-DUBAI):  PLI’s live groupcasts (i.e. live webcasts available for group viewing at co-sponsored locations) may fulfill CLPD credit requirements.


Other Credit Types

CPE Credit (NASBA):  PLI’s live groupcasts (i.e. live webcasts available for group viewing at co-sponsored locations) qualify as the “Group-Live” delivery method. Please check the Credit Information box on the right-hand side of this page to verify CPE credit availability.

IRS Continuing Education (IRS-CE):  PLI’s live groupcasts (i.e. live webcasts available for group viewing at co-sponsored locations) may fulfill IRS-CE requirements. To request IRS-CE credit, please notify PLI at plicredits@pli.edu of your request and include your Preparer Tax Identification Number (PTIN).

Certified Fraud Examiner CPE:  PLI’s live groupcasts (i.e. live webcasts available for group viewing at co-sponsored locations) may fulfill Certified Fraud Examiner CPE requirements. To request CPE credit or find out which programs offer CPE, please contact PLI at plicredits@pli.edu.

IAPP Continuing Privacy Credit (CPE):  PLI’s live groupcasts (i.e. live webcasts available for group viewing at co-sponsored locations) may fulfill Privacy CPE credit requirements.

HR Recertification (HRCI):  PLI’s live groupcasts (i.e. live webcasts available for group viewing at co-sponsored locations) may fulfill HR credit requirements.

SHRM Recertification (SHRM):  PLI’s live groupcasts (i.e. live webcasts available for group viewing at co-sponsored locations) qualify as "instructor-led" credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an SHRM professional can earn via instructor-led programs.

Compliance Certification Board (CCB):  PLI’s live groupcasts (i.e. live webcasts available for group viewing at co-sponsored locations) qualify as “live” training events. There is no limit to the number of credits a candidate or certification holder can earn via live groupcasts.

Certified Anti-Money Laundering Specialists (CAMS):  PLI’s live groupcasts (i.e. live webcasts available for group viewing at co-sponsored locations) may fulfill CAMS credit requirements.

New York State Social Worker Continuing Education (SW CPE):  PLI’s live groupcasts (i.e. live webcasts available for group viewing at co-sponsored locations) may fulfill SW CPE credit requirements.

American Bankers Association Professional Certification (ABA):  PLI’s live groupcasts (i.e. live webcasts available for group viewing at co-sponsored locations) may fulfill ABA credit requirements.

Certified Financial Planners (CFP):  PLI’s live groupcasts (i.e. live webcasts available for group viewing at co-sponsored locations) may fulfill CFP credit requirements.

 

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