TreatiseTreatise

Corporate Legal Departments: Practicing Law in a Corporation (4th Edition)

 by Carole L Basri, Irving Kagan
 
 Copyright: 2011-2017
 Last Updated: October 2017

 Product Details >> 

Product Details

  • ISBN Number: 9781402416927
  • Page Count: 1566
  • Number of Volumes: 2
  •  

Corporate Legal Departments: Practicing Law in a Corporation is an invaluable resource for in-house attorneys, providing guidance on how to:

  • Detect and prevent internal legal problems
  • Contribute to the development of corporate business plans and pursuit of new business opportunities
  • Make the corporate legal department more productive at less cost
  • Maximize the value of digital technologies
  • Use cost-effective litigation strategies
  • Manage corporate crises
  • Minimize your personal legal exposure as a corporate counselor

Corporate Legal Departments features a unique In-House Counsel’s Handbook covering some of the key areas of corporate law and compliance, including antitrust, environmental issues, intellectual property, securities, anti-bribery, export control, immigration, accounting, and data privacy and protection.


  Table of Contents
Chapter 1: Corporate Law Departments—Current Status
  • § 1:1 : The New Millennium—Second Decade1-1
  • § 1:2 : A Blending of Inside and Outside Legal Resources1-6
  • § 1:3 : Changing Times1-7
  • § 1:4 : Management Attitudes1-8
  • § 1:5 : A Few Parting Thoughts1-9
Chapter 2: Organization
  • § 2:1 : Profile of a General Counsel2-1
  • § 2:2 : Scope of Duties2-3
  • § 2:3 : Jurisdiction—General Policies and Procedures2-5
  • § 2:4 : The Compliance/Ethics Officer2-6
  • § 2:5 : Organizational Structure2-6
  • § 2:6 : Modern Law Department Management2-8
    • § 2:6.1 : Six Sigma, Re-Engineering, Value-Added Business Focus, and the ACC Value Challenge2-8
    • § 2:6.2 : Performance Benchmarking and Management2-10
    • § 2:6.3 : Organizational Structure2-11
    • § 2:6.4 : Tasks and Processes2-11
    • § 2:6.5 : Staffing Alternatives2-11
    • § 2:6.6 : Technology2-12
    • § 2:6.7 : Crisis Management2-13
    • § 2:6.8 : Corporate Compliance2-13
    • § 2:6.9 : Litigation Management2-13
  • § 2:7 : Centralization Versus Decentralization2-13
  • § 2:8 : Internal Billing Arrangements2-16
Chapter 3: The Corporate Lawyer
  • § 3:1 : Attorney Job Descriptions3-2
  • § 3:2 : Assigning Legal Responsibilities3-4
    • § 3:2.1 : The Generalist3-4
    • § 3:2.2 : The Specialist3-4
    • § 3:2.3 : The Attorney Manager3-5
  • § 3:3 : Organizing Along Sectional Lines3-6
  • § 3:4 : Recruiting the Professional Staff3-6
    • § 3:4.1 : Recruiting Sources3-7
    • § 3:4.2 : Developing a Law School Recruiting Program3-8
    • § 3:4.3 : The Interview3-10
    • § 3:4.4 : Summer and Year-Round Student Internship Programs3-11
  • § 3:5 : Bar Requirements3-12
  • § 3:6 : Attorney Evaluation and Advancement3-13
    • § 3:6.1 : Performance Reviews3-13
    • § 3:6.2 : Advancement3-14
    • § 3:6.3 : Selecting the Next General Counsel3-15
    • § 3:6.4 : Other Opportunities for Corporate Lawyers3-15
  • § 3:7 : Counsel Development3-16
    • § 3:7.1 : Orientation3-16
  • § 3:8 : Professional Development Programs3-17
    • § 3:8.1 : Purpose3-17
    • § 3:8.2 : What Counsel Want and Expect from Senior Attorneys3-17
    • § 3:8.3 : Selected Legal Subjects Important to the Company3-17
    • § 3:8.4 : Continuing Legal Education Courses3-18
    • § 3:8.5 : Tracking CLE and In-House Seminar Participation3-18
    • § 3:8.6 : Learning More About the Company3-18
    • § 3:8.7 : Developing a Specialist3-19
    • § 3:8.8 : Exchange Programs3-20
    • § 3:8.9 : Scholar in Residence3-20
    • § 3:8.10 : Counsel Rotation Program3-20
  • § 3:9 : Compensation3-22
    • § 3:9.1 : Setting Compensation Rates3-22
    • § 3:9.2 : Compensation Trends3-24
    • § 3:9.3 : Nonmonetary Incentives3-25
Chapter 4: Law Office Management
  • § 4:1 : Managing Lawyers4-2
  • § 4:2 : Departmental Size Affects Management4-2
  • § 4:3 : Management Staff4-2
    • § 4:3.1 : Legal Administrator4-3
    • § 4:3.2 : Paralegal (Legal Assistant)4-3
    • § 4:3.3 : Litigation Paralegal4-5
    • § 4:3.4 : Business Paralegal4-6
    • § 4:3.5 : Corporate and Specialty Law Paralegal4-7
    • § 4:3.6 : Legal Secretary4-9
    • § 4:3.7 : Legal Information Technology Expert4-10
    • § 4:3.8 : Librarian/Legal Research4-11
    • § 4:3.9 : Document Manager4-12
    • § 4:3.10 : Administrative Assistant4-12
  • § 4:4 : Other Corporate Departments4-12
  • § 4:5 : Support Systems4-13
    • § 4:5.1 : Document Construction and Transmission4-13
    • § 4:5.2 : Document Storage and Retrieval4-14
    • § 4:5.3 : Internal Precedent4-15
    • § 4:5.4 : Budgetary Analysis4-15
    • § 4:5.5 : Legal Fees Analysis4-15
    • § 4:5.6 : Conflicts of Interest4-16
  • § 4:6 : Planning and Reporting4-17
    • § 4:6.1 : Corporate Planning Process4-17
    • § 4:6.2 : Long-Range Planning4-18
    • § 4:6.3 : Budgeting4-18
    • § 4:6.4 : Risk Management Versus Resource Management4-19
    • § 4:6.5 : Corporate Reporting Processes4-19
    • § 4:6.6 : Internal Reporting Processes4-20
Chapter 5: Strategic Planning and the Corporate Law Department
  • § 5:1 : Introduction5-1
  • § 5:2 : Long-Range/Strategic Planning5-2
  • § 5:3 : Formulating the Mission5-2
  • § 5:4 : Adding Annual Objectives or Sub-Objectives5-5
  • § 5:5 : Implementing the Plan5-6
  • § 5:6 : A Case Study in Long-Range/Strategic Planning5-8
  • § 5:7 : Legal Involvement in Corporate Planning5-11
    • § 5:7.1 : Planning and Preventive Law5-11
    • § 5:7.2 : In-House Lawyer As a Business Executive5-13
Chapter 6: Law Department Technology
  • § 6:1 : Introduction6-1
  • § 6:2 : Document Creation6-5
  • § 6:3 : Communications6-6
  • § 6:4 : Litigation Case Management6-11
  • § 6:5 : Nonlitigation Case Management6-12
  • § 6:6 : Research and Information6-13
  • § 6:7 : Cloud Computing6-15
  • § 6:8 : Conferencing6-17
  • § 6:9 : Other Applications6-18
  • § 6:10 : How to Select and Leverage Technology Tools6-18
Chapter 7: Law Department Productivity: Re-Engineering, Benchmarking, and Client Surveys; and Exhibits 7A-7G
  • § 7:1 : Introduction7-2
  • § 7:2 : Re-Engineering7-3
    • § 7:2.1 : Stage One: Strategic Positioning and Mission7-3
    • § 7:2.2 : Stage Two: Preparation of Change Plan7-5
    • § 7:2.3 : Stage Three: Identification of Processes7-5
    • § 7:2.4 : Stage Four: Design and Implementation7-5
  • § 7:3 : Total Quality Management: The Forerunner of Re-Engineering7-6
  • § 7:4 : The Role of Client Surveys7-8
  • § 7:5 : Benchmarking7-11
    • § 7:5.1 : Why Benchmark?7-11
    • § 7:5.2 : How to Benchmark7-11
      • [A] : Internal7-11
      • [B] : External7-12
    • § 7:5.3 : Using the Results of Benchmarking7-14
  • § 7:6 : Legal Project Management: The Latest Approach7-15
  • § 7:7 : Parting Thoughts7-16
  • § Exhibit 7A : Exhibit 7A7EXA-1
  • § Exhibit 7B : Exhibit 7B7EXB-1
  • § Exhibit 7C : Exhibit 7C7EXC-1
  • § Exhibit 7D : Exhibit 7D7EXD-1
  • § Exhibit 7E : Exhibit 7E7EXE-1
  • § Exhibit 7F : Exhibit 7F7EXF-1
  • § Exhibit 7G : Exhibit 7G7EXG-1
Chapter 8: The Client—Ethical Considerations
  • § 8:1 : Introduction8-1
  • § 8:2 : Who Is the Client?8-2
  • § 8:3 : Malpractice8-21
Chapter 9: Confidentiality of Communications; and Exhibit 9A
  • § 9:1 : Introduction9-1
  • § 9:2 : Attorney-Client Privilege9-2
  • § 9:3 : Work-Product Doctrine9-12
  • § 9:4 : Self-Evaluative Privilege9-21
  • § 9:5 : Whistleblowing9-24
  • § 9:6 : Waiver9-32
  • § 9:7 : Retaliatory Discharge/Wrongful Termination9-46
  • § 9:8 : The Privilege Internationally9-49
  • § 9:9 : Accountant-Client Privilege9-52
  • § Exhibit 9A : Exhibit 9A9EXA-1
Chapter 10: Legal Services Unique to In-House Counsel; and Exhibits 10A-10C
  • § 10:1 : Proactive/Reactive Lawyering10-1
  • § 10:2 : Involvement in the Corporate Planning Process10-2
  • § 10:3 : Compliance Programs10-3
  • § 10:4 : General Legal Audits10-3
  • § 10:5 : Litigation Audits10-5
  • § 10:6 : Handling Government Inquiries10-8
  • § 10:7 : Conflicts of Interest10-9
  • § 10:8 : Opinions of Counsel10-9
  • § 10:9 : Drafting Affidavits10-10
  • § 10:10 : Crisis Counseling/Management10-10
  • § 10:11 : Record Retention Rules10-11
  • § 10:12 : Providing Legal Services to Employees10-12
    • § 10:12.1 : On Company Matters10-12
    • § 10:12.2 : On Personal Matters10-13
  • § 10:13 : Non-Legal Functions of Law Department10-15
    • § 10:13.1 : Attorneys10-15
  • Exhibit 10A : Checklist for Responding to Search Warrants10EXA-1
  • Exhibit 10B : Model Records Retention Guideline10EXB-1
  • Exhibit 10C : Model Corporate Records Retention Plan10EXC-1
Chapter 11: Corporate Compliance Programs; and Exhibits 11A-11D
  • § 11:1 : Introduction11-2
  • § 11:2 : Necessity of Compliance Programs11-2
  • § 11:3 : Effect of Compliance Programs11-2
  • § 11:4 : Effective Compliance Programs and Early Detection11-3
  • § 11:5 : Effective Compliance Programs and Their Influence on a Prosecutor’s Decision to Indict11-4
  • § 11:6 : Effective Compliance Programs Can Mitigate Penalties upon Conviction11-5
    • § 11:6.1 : Dodd-Frank Whistleblower Program11-6
  • § 11:7 : Possible Downside to Implementing a Compliance Program11-7
    • § 11:7.1 : Enthusiasm11-8
    • § 11:7.2 : Knowledge of the Industry/Company11-8
    • § 11:7.3 : Knowledge of the Law11-9
  • § 11:8 : Implementing an Effective Compliance Program11-10
  • § 11:9 : Compliance and Terrorism11-12
  • § 11:10 : Compliance Program Subjects11-13
    • § 11:10.1 : Antitrust11-13
    • § 11:10.2 : Environmental11-16
    • § 11:10.3 : Employment11-18
    • § 11:10.4 : Intellectual Property11-19
    • § 11:10.5 : Securities Laws11-20
  • § Exhibit 11A : Exhibit 11A11EXA-1
  • § Exhibit 11B : Exhibit 11B11EXB-1
  • § Exhibit 11C : Exhibit 11C11EXC-1
  • § Exhibit 11D : Exhibit 11D11EXD-1
Chapter 12: Internal Investigations; and Exhibits 12A-12F
  • § 12:1 : Introduction12-1
  • § 12:2 : Who Should Conduct the Internal Investigation?12-5
    • § 12:2.1 : In-House Counsel12-5
    • § 12:2.2 : Outside Counsel12-6
    • § 12:2.3 : Private Investigators and Consulting Firms12-7
  • § 12:3 : Investigative Strategies12-9
  • § 12:4 : Confidentiality of Communications12-11
  • § 12:5 : Preserving the Privileges12-13
  • § 12:6 : Authorization Process12-13
  • § 12:7 : Document Production12-14
  • § 12:8 : Employee Interviews and Relations12-15
  • § 12:9 : Resolving and Closing the Investigation12-17
  • § Exhibit 12A : Exhibit 12A12EXA-1
  • § Exhibit 12B : Exhibit 12B12EXB-1
  • § Exhibit 12C : Exhibit 12C12EXC-1
  • § Exhibit 12D : Exhibit 12D12EXD-1
  • § Exhibit 12E : Exhibit 12E12EXE-1
  • § Exhibit 12F : Exhibit 12F12EXF-1
Chapter 13: Crisis Management; and Exhibit 13A
  • § 13:1 : Crisis Management and Terrorism13-1
  • § 13:2 : Corporate Crisis: A View from the Media and the Public13-1
  • § 13:3 : The Nature of a Corporate Crisis13-2
  • § 13:4 : Pre-Crisis Planning13-2
  • § 13:5 : Dealing with a Crisis13-5
  • § 13:6 : When the Smoke Clears13-9
  • § Exhibit 13A : Exhibit 13A13EXA-1
Chapter 14: Litigation Management
  • § 14:1 : Introduction14-3
  • § 14:2 : Considerations in Developing a Litigation Management Strategy14-4
    • § 14:2.1 : Cost Control14-4
      • [A] : Using Corporate Resources14-4
      • [B] : Avoiding Unnecessary Legal Services14-4
    • § 14:2.2 : High-Quality Representation14-5
      • [A] : Benefiting from In-House Knowledge and Expertise14-5
      • [B] : Community Parochialism, Pro Hac Vice Rules, and Procedural and Evidentiary Variations14-6
  • § 14:3 : Intangible Benefits Associated with Handling Litigation In-House14-7
  • § 14:4 : Some Practical Impediments to Handling Litigation In-House14-8
  • § 14:5 : E-Discovery Management14-8
    • § 14:5.1 : Retaining Electronic Data14-9
      • [A] : Obligation to Preserve Electronic Data14-10
      • [B] : Fulfillment of Document Preservation Obligations14-12
    • § 14:5.2 : Managing E-Discovery14-14
      • [A] : Cost Control14-15
      • [B] : Time Saving14-16
      • [C] : Litigation Readiness; Early Case Assessment14-16
    • § 14:5.3 : Electronic Discovery Strategy14-17
      • [A] : Evaluating the Preservation Obligation14-17
      • [B] : Anticipating the Scope of Discovery14-18
      • [C] : Researching Opposition and Developing Offensive Strategy14-18
      • [D] : Strategizing the Discovery14-18
      • [E] : Negotiating the Discovery14-19
    • § 14:5.4 : Electronic Discovery Conclusion14-19
      • [A] : Electronic Discovery Timeline14-19
      • [B] : Form 3514-20
  • § 14:6 : General Considerations14-21
  • § 14:7 : Current Trends in Litigation Strategies14-22
  • § 14:8 : Three Litigation Strategies14-22
    • § 14:8.1 : Option One: Only Manage Litigation14-22
      • [A] : Degree of Management14-23
      • [B] : Staff Considerations14-24
      • [C] : Information System Required14-24
      • [D] : Cost Control14-24
      • [E] : Learning from Experience14-25
    • § 14:8.2 : Option Two: Manage and Litigate14-25
      • [A] : Criteria for Selecting Cases to Litigate In-House14-25
        • [A][1] : Nature of the Case14-25
        • [A][2] : Geographic Considerations14-26
        • [A][3] : Training Opportunity14-26
        • [A][4] : Availability of In-House Resources—Monetary Cutoffs14-26
      • [B] : Using the Criteria14-27
      • [C] : Other Considerations in Selecting Option Two14-28
        • [C][1] : Staff14-28
        • [C][2] : Information System Required14-28
        • [C][3] : Cost Control14-28
        • [C][4] : Learning from Experience14-29
        • [C][5] : Intangible Factors14-29
    • § 14:8.3 : Option Three: Litigate All But Unusual Cases14-29
      • [A] : Cost Control14-30
      • [B] : Staff Considerations14-30
      • [C] : Successful Outside Counsel Relationships14-31
      • [D] : Support Structure14-31
      • [E] : Intangible Benefits14-31
    • § 14:8.4 : Steps to Successfully Handling Litigation In-House14-32
      • [A] : Achieving Maximum Efficiencies14-32
  • § 14:9 : Choosing a Litigation Strategy14-33
  • § 14:10 : Performing a Litigation Risk Analysis14-33
  • § 14:11 : Building a Decision Tree14-35
    • § 14:11.1 : Decision Tree: Decision to Settle14-35
  • § 14:12 : Evaluate the Summons and Service14-36
  • § 14:13 : Evaluate the Complaint and Liability14-36
    • § 14:13.1 : Checklist for Evaluating Complaint and Liability14-37
  • § 14:14 : Pursue Early Resolution or Obtain an Extension of Time14-37
  • § 14:15 : Investigate the Facts and Contact Clients14-38
    • § 14:15.1 : Opposing Counsel14-38
    • § 14:15.2 : Clients14-38
    • § 14:15.3 : Insured Liabilities14-39
    • § 14:15.4 : Workers’ Compensation14-39
    • § 14:15.5 : Manager and Location14-39
    • § 14:15.6 : Customer Service or Complaints Department14-40
    • § 14:15.7 : Other In-House Attorneys14-40
    • § 14:15.8 : Other Corporate Staff14-41
    • § 14:15.9 : Employee Indemnification14-41
    • § 14:15.10 : General Points for All Clients14-42
    • § 14:15.11 : Privileged Communications14-42
    • § 14:15.12 : Other Sources of Information14-43
    • § 14:15.13 : Special Considerations14-43
  • § 14:16 : Preventive Counseling14-43
  • § 14:17 : Early Settlement/Alternate Dispute Resolution14-44
  • § 14:18 : What Is Early Settlement/Alternate Dispute Resolution?14-44
  • § 14:19 : Trends14-45
  • § 14:20 : Pros and Cons14-46
  • § 14:21 : Setting a Policy14-46
  • § 14:22 : Steps to Early Resolution14-48
    • § 14:22.1 : Contact Plaintiff’s Attorney and Obtain Extension of Time14-48
  • § 14:23 : Settlement Authority14-49
  • § 14:24 : When to Invoke ADR14-49
  • § 14:25 : Picking the Best Option14-50
  • § 14:26 : What a Third Party Can Do14-50
  • § 14:27 : Administrative Procedures and Litigation Support14-50
    • § 14:27.1 : Computerized Litigation Support14-50
      • [A] : Case Management and Integrated Data Base14-51
      • [B] : Professional Fees Analysis14-52
      • [C] : Calendar14-52
      • [D] : Computerized Legal Research14-52
      • [E] : In-House Information Storage and Retrieval Systems14-53
      • [F] : Client and Outside Counsel Communication14-53
      • [G] : Document Management and Trial Assistance14-53
      • [H] : Other Computer Applications14-54
    • § 14:27.2 : In-House Resources14-54
      • [A] : Library14-54
      • [B] : Standard Forms14-54
      • [C] : Other Resources14-55
    • § 14:27.3 : Administrative Procedures14-55
      • [A] : Processing a New Lawsuit14-55
      • [B] : Procedures for Bringing Suit14-56
Chapter 15: Retaining and Managing Outside Counsel; and Exhibits 15A-15I
  • § 15:1 : Introduction15-2
  • § 15:2 : Change Is the Touchstone15-3
  • § 15:3 : When to Retain Outside Counsel15-4
    • § 15:3.1 : Authority to Hire15-4
    • § 15:3.2 : Determining When Outside Counsel Is Needed15-5
  • § 15:4 : In-House Versus Outside Counsel15-6
    • § 15:4.1 : Law Department15-6
    • § 15:4.2 : Outside Counsel15-7
  • § 15:5 : Selecting Outside Counsel15-7
    • § 15:5.1 : Methods: RFP, Beauty Contest, Auction15-7
    • § 15:5.2 : The Selection Process15-12
  • § 15:6 : Establishing Guidelines and Dividing Responsibilities15-14
    • § 15:6.1 : The Role of Staff Counsel15-17
    • § 15:6.2 : The Role of Outside Counsel15-18
  • § 15:7 : Controlling Costs15-20
    • § 15:7.1 : Developing a Budget15-21
    • § 15:7.2 : Billing Policies15-22
    • § 15:7.3 : Hourly Billing15-26
    • § 15:7.4 : Alternative Fee Arrangements15-27
      • [A] : Fixed Fee15-28
      • [B] : Premium or Value Billing15-29
      • [C] : Contingency Fees15-29
      • [D] : Third-Party Commercial Litigation Funding15-29
  • § 15:8 : Evaluating Outside Counsel15-31
  • § 15:9 : What Outside Counsel Expect of Law Departments15-32
  • § 15:10 : The Goal: Realizing Cost-Effective Quality Service15-36
  • § Exhibit 15A : Exhibit 15A15EXA-1
  • § Exhibit 15B : Exhibit 15B15EXB-1
  • § Exhibit 15C : Exhibit 15C15EXC-1
  • § Exhibit 15D : Exhibit 15D15EXD-1
  • § Exhibit 15E : Exhibit 15E15EXE-1
  • § Exhibit 15F : Exhibit 15F15EXF-1
  • § Exhibit 15G : Exhibit 15G15EXG-1
  • § Exhibit 15H : Exhibit 15H15EXH-1
  • § Exhibit 15I : Exhibit 15I15EXI-1
Chapter 16: Corporate Governance
  • § 16:1 : Introduction16-1
  • § 16:2 : Duty of Care16-3
    • § 16:2.1 : Basic Considerations16-3
    • § 16:2.2 : Duty of Care in the Decision-Making Context16-6
    • § 16:2.3 : Duty of Care in the Non-Decision-Making (or Monitoring) Context16-12
    • § 16:2.4 : Corporate Social Responsibility16-13
  • § 16:3 : The Business Judgment Rule16-15
    • § 16:3.1 : Classic Business Judgment Rule16-15
    • § 16:3.2 : Enhanced Business Judgment Rule16-16
    • § 16:3.3 : Operative Elements of the Classic Business Judgment Rule16-17
  • § 16:4 : The Caremark Case and Directors’ Duty to Establish Compliance Programs16-18
  • § 16:5 : Dilemma of Counsel Serving on Board of Directors16-21
    • § 16:5.1 : Benefits of the Dual Role16-22
    • § 16:5.2 : Conflicts of Interest and Independence As a Lawyer16-23
    • § 16:5.3 : Issues of Liability16-26
    • § 16:5.4 : Attorney-Client Privilege Compromised16-28
    • § 16:5.5 : Risk-Minimizing Suggestions16-28
  • § 16:6 : Miscellaneous Issues16-29
    • § 16:6.1 : Exculpation16-29
    • § 16:6.2 : Indemnification16-30
Chapter 17: Globalization and In-House Counsel; and Exhibit 17A
  • Exhibit 17A : Table of Chapters, International Corporate Practice17EXA-1
Chapter 18: The Sole In-House Practitioner
  • § 18:1 : Introduction18-1
  • § 18:2 : The Advent of the Sole In-House Lawyer18-2
  • § 18:3 : Profile of a Sole Practitioner18-2
  • § 18:4 : Role of the Sole Practitioner18-3
  • § 18:5 : Interfacing with Top Management18-4
  • § 18:6 : Major Legal Duties and Responsibilities18-5
  • § 18:7 : Comparing the Sole Practitioner’s Role with That of the Larger Law Department18-8
  • § 18:8 : Relationship with Outside Counsel18-9
  • § 18:9 : Peculiar Needs and Problems of the Sole Practitioner18-11
    • § 18:9.1 : Professional Interaction vs. Isolation18-12
    • § 18:9.2 : Career Development Opportunities and Limitations18-13
    • § 18:9.3 : Compensation18-14
    • § 18:9.4 : Support Resources18-15
    • § 18:9.5 : Budgets18-15
    • § 18:9.6 : Pro Bono and Other Activities18-16
    • § 18:9.7 : Ethical Pressures18-16
  • § 18:10 : Starting a One-Person Law Department18-17
  Epilogue: Future of the Corporate Counsel
Appendix A: In-House Counsel’s Handbook
Appendix A1: The Federal Antitrust Laws
Appendix A2: Employment Law
Appendix A3: Environmental Law
Appendix A4: Securities Laws
Appendix A5: Whistleblower Provisions of the Dodd-Frank Act
Appendix A6: Foreign Corrupt Practices Act
Appendix A7: Export Control Laws
Appendix A8: U.S. Customs Law and Compliance
Appendix A9: Money Laundering and Asset Forfeiture
Appendix A10: Intellectual Property in Marketing Communications
Appendix A11: Privacy and Data Protection Law
Appendix A12: Advertising and Promotion Liability
Appendix A13: Arbitration
Appendix A14: Electronic Discovery: Being Prepared for Litigation
Appendix A15: Bankruptcy
Appendix A16: Accounting for Nonaccountants
Appendix A17: Immigration Law
Appendix A18: A Policyholder’s Primer on Insurance
Appendix A19: Real Estate Leasing Transactions
Appendix A20: In-House Counsel Pro Bono Programs
  Index

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