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Communications Law in the Digital Age 2017

Released on: Nov. 17, 2017
Running Time: 13:21:05

Media and communications law is continuing to evolve in response to new challenges and the rise of digital and social media. The areas of First Amendment, privacy, intellectual property, newsgathering and reporter’s privilege law are changing rapidly. The Trump administration’s initiatives in these and other areas are also affecting  advice to clients.  The expert faculty of law firm practitioners, in-house counsel, government officials, and academics will address these issues. Unlike any other program, Communications Law in the Digital Age 2017 is a comprehensive, “one-stop shop,” providing the legal, strategic and practical knowledge needed to keep apace in these areas of law. This program is designed for firm attorneys, in-house counsel and other professionals who practice in the fields of media and telecommunications, corporate compliance, privacy, and First Amendment law.

Topics Include 

  • The latest on the FCC’s regulation of the communications sector
  • New First Amendment developments
  • U.S. and European legislative, judicial and regulatory developments on data protection and privacy
  • Updates on reporter’s privilege and newsgathering liability
  • Important recent intellectual property decisions affecting the media
  • Current issues in right of publicity law
  • Fake news, Communications Decency Act, Section 230 and commercial speech
  • Earn one hour of ethics credit!

 Featured Speaker: Paul Steiger, Executive Chairman, ProPublica

Lecture Topics [Total time 00:15:00]
Segments with an asterisk (*) are available only with the purchase of the entire program.


  • Opening Remarks and Introduction* [00:02:42]
  • Electronic Media Regulation [01:22:57]
    Kathleen A. Kirby, Jeffrey P. Cunard, Rick Kaplan, Sherrese M. Smith, Gigi B. Sohn, James M. Assey
  • First Amendment Jurisprudence [01:19:54]
    Paul M. Smith, Lee Levine, Adam Liptak, Kathleen M. Sullivan, RonNell Andersen Jones, Jack M. Weiss
  • Intellectual Property Law [01:17:05]
    Bruce P. Keller, Jeffrey P. Cunard, Joseph C. Gratz, Jennifer L. Pariser, Marcia B. Paul
  • Access [00:59:22]
    David E. McCraw, Lee Levine, Lucy A. Dalglish, James A McLaughlin, David A. Schulz
  • Right of Publicity and Related Claims [01:01:51]
    Kelli L. Sager, Jeremy Feigelson, Stephanie S. Abrutyn, Jennifer E. Rothman
  • Featured Speaker & Q&A [00:30:15]
    Paul Steiger, Jeremy Feigelson
  • Defamation and Related Claims [01:14:13]
    Lee Levine, Tom Clare, Jonathan R. Donnellan, Barbara W. Wall, Rachel E. Fugate, Thomas G. Hentoff
  • Global Privacy and Data Protection [01:15:49]
    Jane E. Kirtley, Jeremy Feigelson, Alfredo Della Monica, Laura Riposo VanDruff, Pauline Wen, Flora Lau
  • Legal Ethics for Media Lawyers: Current Issues [01:02:40]
    Leonard Niehoff, Sue Friedberg, Susan Weiner, Jeffrey Glasser
  • Newsgathering and Privacy Liability [01:01:27]
    Thomas S. Leatherbury, Lee Levine, Dale M. Cohen, Lynn B. Oberlander, Mark Stephens, CBE
  • Reporter’s Privilege and Anonymous Speech [01:12:40]
    Karen Kaiser, Lee Levine, George Freeman, Mary-Rose Papandrea, Jason P. Conti, Gregg Leslie
  • Special Topics: Fake News, Section 230 and Commercial Speech [01:00:10]
    Jeffrey P. Cunard, Ari Holtzblatt, Bruce E. H. Johnson, Emma Llansó, Jeremy Feigelson

The purchase price of this Web Program includes the following articles from the Course Handbook available online:


  • COMPLETE COURSE HANDBOOK
  • Communications Law 2017 (September 2017)
    Kathleen A. Kirby, Ari S. Meltzer
  • Intellectual Property 2017: Select Developments
    Justin C. Ferrone, Jared I. Kagan, Jeffrey P. Cunard
  • 2017 Update: Developments in the Law of Access (September 1, 2017)
    Maxwell S. Mishkin, Al-Amyn Sumar, Alexander I. Ziccardi, David A. Schulz
  • Developments in Misappropriation and Right of Publicity Law (August 2017)
    Kelli L. Sager
  • Global Privacy and Data Protection—2017 (September 1, 2017)
    Jane E. Kirtley
  • Ethics for Media Lawyers: The Lessons of Ferguson, Communications Lawyer, Volume 31, Number 3, Summer 2015
    Leonard Niehoff
  • Noah Jon Kores, The Ethics of Threatening, Litigation, pp. 42–46, Volume 43, Number 3, Spring 2017
    Leonard Niehoff
  • Christine Simmons, Lawyer’s ‘Inadvertent’ E-Discovery Failures Led to Wells Fargo Data Breach, New York Law Journal, July 26, 2017
    Leonard Niehoff
  • Opinion and Order: James H. Fischer v. Stephen T. Forrest, Jr., Sandra F. Forrest, Shane R. Gebauer, and Brushy Mountain Bee Farm, Inc., 14 Civ. 1304, 1307 (PAE) (AJP) (S.D.N.Y. Feb. 28, 2017)
    Leonard Niehoff
  • Inadvertent Receipt of Privileged Documents
    Jeffrey Glasser
  • 2017 Update: Developments in the Law of Newsgathering Liability (From August 2016 through August 2017)
    Thomas S. Leatherbury, Tian Tian Xin, Bryan U. Gividen, Marc A. Fuller
  • Immunity Blind Spots for Journalists and Media Lawyers
    Sanford L. Bohrer
  • Anonymous Online Speech 2016-17
    Mara J. Gassmann, Matthew E. Kelley, Ashley I. Kissinger
  • “Fake News” and the First Amendment
    Bruce E. H. Johnson
  • Memorandum: PLI Commercial Speech Update (September 6, 2017)
    Jonathan H. Levy, Victoria Peng, Steven G. Brody, Hugo Ruiz

Presentation Material

  • Supplemental Materials
  • Developments in Electronic Media Regulation
    Kathleen A. Kirby
  • Notable First Amendment Cases (June 2016 – July 2017)
    RonNell Andersen Jones
  • Intellectual Property
    Bruce P. Keller
  • Totally Bigly: Access in the Year of Trump
    David E. McCraw
  • The Right of Publicity:Privacy Reimagined for a Public World
    Jennifer E. Rothman
  • Defamation Law Case Summaries for PLI (September 2016 – September 2017)
    Thomas G. Hentoff
  • Defamation and Related Claims 2017
    Thomas G. Hentoff
  • Legal Ethics for Media Lawyers: Current Issues
  • 2016-17 Developments in Newsgathering and Privacy Liability
    Thomas S. Leatherbury
  • Reporter’s Privilege and Anonymous Speech: Recent Developments 2016-17 (September 2017)
    Mary-Rose Papandrea
  • Noteworthy Decisions Applying Section 230 in 2016 and 2017
    Ari Holtzblatt
Co-Chair(s)
Jeffrey P. Cunard ~ Debevoise & Plimpton LLP
Jeremy Feigelson ~ Debevoise & Plimpton LLP
Lee Levine ~ Ballard Spahr LLP
Speaker(s)
Stephanie S. Abrutyn ~ Senior Vice President & Chief Counsel, Litigation, Home Box Office, Inc.
James M. Assey ~ Executive Vice President, NCTA -The Internet & Television Association
Tom Clare ~ Clare Locke LLP
Dale M. Cohen ~ Director, Documentary FIlm Legal Clinic, UCLA School of Law; Senior Counsel for Frontline, WGBH
Jason P. Conti ~ General Counsel and Chief Compliance Officer , Dow Jones & Company, Inc
Lucy A. Dalglish ~ Dean, Philip Merrill College of Journalism, University of Maryland
Alfredo Della Monica ~ Vice President & Senior Counsel - U.S. Privacy, EMEA Data Protection and Cybersecurity Oversight, American Express
Jonathan R. Donnellan ~ Vice President and Deputy General Counsel, Hearst Corporation
George Freeman ~ Executive Director, Media Law Resource Center
Sue Friedberg ~ Buchanan Ingersoll & Rooney PC
Rachel E. Fugate ~ Shullman Fugate PLLC
Jeffrey Glasser ~ Vice President, Legal, Los Angeles Times
Joseph C. Gratz ~ Durie Tangri LLP
Thomas G. Hentoff ~ Williams & Connolly LLP
Ari Holtzblatt ~ WilmerHale LLP
Bruce E. H. Johnson ~ Davis Wright Tremaine LLP
RonNell Andersen Jones ~ Lee E. Teitelbaum Endowed Chair and Professor of Law, S.J. Quinney College of Law, University of Utah
Karen Kaiser ~ Senior Vice President, General Counsel, and Corporate Secretary, The Associated Press
Rick Kaplan ~ General Counsel and Executive Vice President of Legal and Regulatory Affairs, National Association of Broadcasters
Bruce P. Keller ~ Assistant United States Attorney, District of New Jersey, United States Attorney's Office
Kathleen A. Kirby ~ Wiley Rein LLP
Jane E. Kirtley ~ Silha Professor of Media Ethics and Law, University of Minnesota
Flora Lau ~ General Counsel, 360i
Thomas S. Leatherbury ~ Vinson & Elkins LLP
Gregg Leslie ~ Legal Defense Director, The Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press
Adam Liptak ~ Supreme Court Correspondent, The New York Times
Emma Llansó ~ Director, Free Expression Project, Center for Democracy and Technology
David E. McCraw ~ Vice President and Deputy General Counsel, The New York Times Company
James A McLaughlin ~ Deputy General Counsel, Director of Government Affairs, The Washington Post
Leonard Niehoff ~ Honigman Miller Schwartz & Cohn, Professor, The University of Michigan Law School
Lynn B. Oberlander ~ Executive Vice President and General Counsel, Gizmodo Media Group, LLC
Mary-Rose Papandrea ~ Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Professor of Law, University of North Carolina
Jennifer L. Pariser ~ Vice President, Executive Director of Academic Outreach, Motion Picture Association of America
Marcia B. Paul ~ Davis Wright & Tremaine LLP
Jennifer E. Rothman ~ Professor of Law, Joseph Scott Fellow, Loyola Law School, Loyola Marymount University
Kelli L. Sager ~ Davis Wright Tremaine LLP
David A. Schulz ~ Ballard Spahr LLP
Paul M. Smith ~ Vice President, Litigation and Strategy, Campaign Legal Center; Visiting Professor , Georgetown University Law School
Sherrese M. Smith ~ Paul Hastings LLP
Gigi B. Sohn ~ Leadership in Government Fellow, Open Society Foundations
Paul Steiger ~ Executive Chairman, ProPublica
Mark Stephens, CBE ~ Howard Kennedy LLP
Kathleen M. Sullivan ~ Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan, LLP
Laura Riposo VanDruff ~ Assistant Director, Division of Privacy and Identity Protection, Federal Trade Commission
Barbara W. Wall ~ Senior Vice President and Chief Legal Officer, Gannett Co., Inc.
Susan Weiner ~ General Counsel, NBCUniversal News Group, Executive Vice President, NBCUniversal
Jack M. Weiss ~ Liskow & Lewis
Pauline Wen ~ Senior Vice President and Chief Privacy Officer, 21st Century Fox, Inc.
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Related Items

Live Programs  Live Programs

Communications Law in the Digital Age 2018 (New York, NY) Nov. 8 - 9, 2018

Handbook  Course Handbook Archive

Communications Law in the Digital Age 2018  
Communications Law in the Digital Age 2017 Jeffrey P Cunard, Debevoise & Plimpton LLP
Jeremy Feigelson, Debevoise & Plimpton LLP
Lee Levine, Ballard Spahr LLP
 
Communications Law in the Digital Age 2016 Jeffrey P Cunard, Debevoise & Plimpton LLP
Jeremy Feigelson, Debevoise & Plimpton LLP
Lee Levine, Levine Sullivan Koch & Schulz LLP
 
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“The quality of the speakers and the timeliness of issues are unsurpassed.”
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“This is always the most informative and interesting media law program of the year.”

“Great program. All the speakers were first rate, knowledgeable, experienced and intelligent.”

2016 Attendees


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