On-Demand   On-Demand Web Programs

19th Annual Commercial Real Estate Institute

Released on: Nov. 17, 2017
Running Time: 12:34:35
Improving the skill of identifying, appreciating and weighing your client’s leverage in negotiating the commercial real estate fundamentals (rents, vacancy rates and development activity) will be the focus of the 2017 Commercial Real Estate Institute. Practitioners with this understanding will find it easier to achieve and maintain a viable real estate practice where their advice adds value. This program helps practicing attorneys enhance those abilities while performing the traditional transactional skills, and while developing workout and enforcement skills, so that they can help their clients take advantage of their leverage and regain any lost footing more quickly.

Lecture Topics [Total time 00:13:45]

Segments with an asterisk (*) are available only with the purchase of the entire program.

  • Introduction* [00:04:36]
    Richard C. Mallory
  • State of the Market and Purchases, Sales and Closing [01:51:34]
    Mark McGranahan, Jodi B. Fedor, Danna M. Kozerski
  • Commercial Leasing [01:31:15]
    Joan H. Story, Jo Ann Woodsum
  • Mortgage Financing [01:30:50]
    Teresa K. Goebel, Stephen P. Lieske, David I. Paulson
  • Real Estate Litigation: A Toolkit for Transactional Lawyers [01:30:15]
    Denis F. Shanagher, Robert Charles Ward
  • Joint Ventures [01:16:50]
    Beth Pennington, David A. Hamsher
  • Environmental Law in Real Estate Transactions [01:15:45]
    Nicholas W. Targ
  • Construction Issues [01:15:55]
    Richard Van Duzer
  • Selected Issues in Shopping Center Transactions [01:15:45]
    Mark S. Hennigh, Richard C. Mallory
  • Ethical Issues Facing Real Estate Attorneys [01:01:50]
    Steven Cvitanovic, Robert S. Miller

The purchase price of this Web Program includes the following articles from the Course Handbook available online:

  • COMPLETE COURSE HANDBOOK
  • Purchases, Sales and Closing (August 2017)
    Jonathan L. Mechanic
  • Purchases, Sales and Closing
    Jodi B. Fedor, Danna M. Kozerski
  • Closing Checklist—Responsibility and Status Schedule
    Jodi B. Fedor, Danna M. Kozerski
  • Purchase and Sale Agreement
    Danna M. Kozerski, Jodi B. Fedor
  • Purchases, Sales and Closing (PowerPoint slides)
    Mary Ann Murray, Lawrence C. Eppley
  • Commercial Leases Overview—Selected Articles
    Richard C. Mallory
  • Tax Considerations Affecting Construction Allowances and Disposition of Leasehold Improvements
    Stephen A. Bonovich, Saba S. Shatara, Richard C. Mallory, Mark S. Hennigh
  • Perspectives in Commercial Leasing
    Jay Stieber, Harold S. Dembo
  • Real Estate Financing Overview (July 20, 2017)
    David I. Paulson, Stephen P. Lieske, Teresa K. Goebel
  • Mortgage Financing (PowerPoint slides)
    Merle Teitelbaum Cowin, Andrew D. Small, LaVon M. Johns
  • The Real Estate Litigation Primer for the Transactional Lawyer (August 2016)
    Mitchell D. Haddad
  • Real Estate Transactions—Spotting Litigation Issues
    Ally Hack, Menachem J. Kastner
  • What Could Possibly Go Wrong? An Abbreviated Survey of the Commercial Lease Minefield
    Michael A. Weinberg
  • Key Issues List—Joint Venture Agreements (September 11, 2017)
    Steven L. Wilner
  • Pros and Cons of Real Estate Joint Ventures for Developers and Sponsors
    James Coleman, Beth Pennington
  • Environmental and Land Use Issues for the Sophisticated Real Estate Practice (August 7, 2017)
    Philip E. Karmel
  • Commercial Real Estate Institute: Construction Issues
    Wm. Cary Wright
  • Construction Project Delivery Systems
    James J. Terry
  • Public-Private Partnerships—The Trend in Construction
    James J. Terry
  • Selected Issues in Shopping Center Transactions: Cotenancies and Prohibited Uses
    Phyllis L. Volk
  • The Fundamentals of Shopping Center REAs
    Marjorie J. Zessar
  • Selected Issues in Shopping Center Transactions
    Nicole Levin Mesard, Ellen Sinreich
  • Selected Issues in Shopping Center Transactions (PowerPoint slides)
    Nicole Levin Mesard, Ellen Sinreich
  • Selected Issues in Shopping Center Transactions
    Edward Krasnove, Stephen K. Cassidy, Richard C. Mallory
  • Real Estate Ethics Update 2017
    Deborah A. Scalise, Sarah Jo Hamilton
  • Dealing with an Ethical Dilemma
    Deborah A. Scalise
  • Ethics Resources 2017
    Deborah A. Scalise
  • Ethical Issues Facing Real Estate Attorneys
    Randy J. Curato, Stanley P. Sklar
  • Ethical Issues Facing Real Attorneys
    Robert S. Miller, Steven Cvitanovic

Presentation Material

  • Market Insights _ Power Point for "State of the Market and Purchases, Sales and Closing" Segment
    Mark McGranahan
  • Real Estate Financing _ Power Point for "Mortgage Financing" Segment
    Teresa K. Goebel, Stephen P. Lieske, David I. Paulson
  • Power Point for "Real Estate Litigation: A Toolkit for Transactional Lawyers" Segment
    Denis F. Shanagher, Robert Charles Ward
  • Real Estate Joint Ventures _ Power Point for "Joint Ventures" Segment
    David A. Hamsher, Beth Pennington
  • Environmental and Land use Issues in Real Estate Deals _Power Point for "Environmental Law in Real Estate Transactions" Segment
    Nicholas W. Targ
  • Construction for Commercial Real Estate Owners and Developers _ Power Point for “Construction Issues” Segment
    Richard Van Duzer
  • Power Point for "Ethical Issues Facing Real Estate Attorneys"
    Steven Cvitanovic, Robert S. Miller
Chairperson(s)
Richard C. Mallory ~ Allen Matkins Leck Gamble Mallory & Natsis LLP
Speaker(s)
Steven Cvitanovic ~ Haight Brown & Bonesteel LLP
Jodi B. Fedor ~ SSL Law Firm LLP
Teresa K. Goebel ~ Goodwin Procter LLP
David A. Hamsher ~ Paul Hastings LLP
Mark S. Hennigh ~ Greene Radovsky Maloney Share & Hennigh LLP
Danna M. Kozerski ~ Coblentz Patch Duffy & Bass LLP
Stephen P. Lieske ~ Allen Matkins Leck Gamble & Mallory LLP
Mark McGranahan ~ Cushman & Wakefield
Robert S. Miller ~ Lubin Olson & Niewiadomski LLP
David I. Paulson ~ Jones Day
Beth Pennington ~ Pennington Lawson LLP
Denis F. Shanagher ~ Duane Morris LLP
Joan H. Story ~ Sheppard Mullin Richter & Hampton LLP
Nicholas W. Targ ~ Holland & Knight LLP
Richard Van Duzer ~ Farella Braun & Martel LLP
Robert Charles Ward ~ Shartsis Friese LLP
Jo Ann Woodsum ~ The Law Offices of Jo Ann Woodsum
General credit information about this format appears below. For credit information specific to this program, please choose your jurisdiction(s) in the Credit Information box on the right-hand side of this page.

PLI’s live and on-demand webcasts are single-user license products intended for an individual registrant only. Credit will be issued only to the individual registered.


U.S. MCLE States

Alabama:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “online” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of online programs per reporting period.

Alaska:  All PLI products can fulfill Alaska’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Arizona:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “interactive CLE” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via interactive CLE programs.

Arkansas:  PLI’s on-demand web programs are not approved for Arkansas CLE credit.

California:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “participatory” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via participatory programs.

Colorado:  All PLI products can fulfill Colorado’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Connecticut: Effective January 1, 2017, all PLI products can fulfill Connecticut’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Delaware:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “eCLE” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of eCLE per reporting period, no more than 6 of which may be audio-only.

Florida:  All PLI products can fulfill Florida’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Georgia:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “in-house” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 in-house credits per reporting period.

Hawaii:  All PLI products can fulfill Hawaii’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Idaho:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 15 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Illinois:  All PLI products can fulfill Illinois' CLE requirements for experienced attorneys. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Indiana:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “distance education” credit. Attorneys are limited to 9 credits of distance education per reporting period.

Iowa:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “unmoderated” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of unmoderated programs per reporting period.

Kansas:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “prerecorded” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of prerecorded programs per reporting period.

Kentucky:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “non-live” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 non-live credits per reporting period.

Louisiana:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 4 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Maine:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 5.5 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Minnesota:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “on-demand” credit. Attorneys are limited to 15 on-demand credits per reporting period.

Mississippi:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “distance learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of distance learning per reporting period.

Missouri:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Montana:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 5 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Nebraska:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “computer-based learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 5 credits of computer-based learning per reporting period.

Nevada:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via self-study programs.

New Hampshire:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of self-study per reporting period.

New Jersey:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “alternative verifiable learning formats” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of alternative verifiable learning formats per reporting period.

New Mexico:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 4 credits of self-study per reporting period.

New York

Experienced Attorneys:  All PLI products can fulfill New York’s CLE requirements for experienced attorneys. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Newly Admitted Attorneys:  PLI’s transitional on-demand web programs can be used to fulfill the requirements for New York newly admitted attorneys. Only professional practice and law practice management credits may be earned via transitional on-demand web programs. Ethics and skills credits may not be earned via on-demand web programs.

North Carolina:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “online” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of online programs per reporting period.

North Dakota:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 15 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Ohio:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Oklahoma:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “online, on-demand” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of online, on-demand programs per reporting period.

Oregon:  All PLI products can fulfill Oregon’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Pennsylvania:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “distance learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of distance learning per reporting period.

Puerto Rico:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “non-traditional” credit. Attorneys are limited to 8 credits of non-traditional programs per reporting period.

Rhode Island:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “on-demand” credit. Attorneys are limited to 3 on-demand credits per reporting period.

South Carolina:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “alternatively delivered” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of alternatively delivered programs per reporting period.

Tennessee:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “distance learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 8 credits of distance learning per reporting period.

Texas:  All PLI products can fulfill Texas’ CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Utah:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Vermont:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 10 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Virgin Islands:  All PLI products can fulfill the Virgin Islands’ CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Virginia:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “pre-recorded” credit. Attorneys are limited to 8 credits of pre-recorded programs per reporting period.

Washington:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “A/V” credit. Attorneys are limited to 22.5 credits of A/V programs per reporting period.

West Virginia:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “online” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of online instruction per reporting period.

Wisconsin:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “repeated, on-demand” credit. Attorneys are limited to 15 credits of repeated, on-demand programs per reporting period. No ethics credits can be earned via on-demand web programs.

Wyoming:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of self-study per reporting period.


CPD Jurisdictions

British Columbia (CPD-BC):  PLI’s on-demand web programs are not eligible for CPD-BC credit unless viewed with at least one other attorney or an articled student. In this case, the credit must be recorded as a “study group.”

Ontario (CPD-ON):  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “recorded” credit. If viewed without a colleague, attorneys are limited to 6 credits of recorded programs per year. If viewed with at least one colleague, there is no limit to the number of credits that can be earned via recorded programs.

Quebec (CPD-QC):  PLI’s on-demand web programs can fulfill Quebec’s CPD requirements.

Hong Kong (CPD-HK):  PLI’s on-demand web programs are not approved for CPD-HK credit.

United Kingdom (CPD-UK):  PLI’s on-demand web programs can fulfill the United Kingdom’s CPD requirements.

Australia (CPD-AUS):  PLI’s on-demand web programs may fulfill Australia’s CPD requirements. Credit limits for on-demand web programs vary according to jurisdiction. Please refer to your jurisdiction’s CPD information page for specifics.


Other Credit Types

CPE Credit (NASBA):  Select on-demand web programs qualify as “QAS Self-Study” credit. Please check the Credit Information box on the right-hand side of this page to verify CPE credit availability.

IRS Continuing Education (IRS-CE):  PLI’s on-demand web programs may fulfill IRS-CE requirements. To request IRS-CE credit, please notify PLI at plicredits@pli.edu of your request and include your Preparer Tax Identification Number (PTIN).

Certified Fraud Examiner CPE:  PLI’s on-demand web programs may fulfill Certified Fraud Examiner CPE requirements. To request CPE credit or find out which programs offer CPE, please contact PLI at plicredits@pli.edu.

IAPP Continuing Privacy Credit (CPE):  PLI’s on-demand web programs may fulfill Privacy CPE credit requirements.

HR Recertification (HRCI):  PLI’s on-demand web programs may fulfill HR credit requirements.

SHRM Recertification (SHRM):  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as "self-paced" credit. SHRM professionals are limited to 30 credits of self-paced programs per recertification period.

Compliance Certification Board (CCB):  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Candidates are limited to 10 self-study credits per 12-month period, and certification holders are limited to 20 self-study credits per 2-year renewal period.

Certified Anti-Money Laundering Specialists Certification (CAMS):  PLI’s on-demand web programs are not approved for CAMS credit.

New York State Social Worker Continuing Education (SW CPE):  PLI’s on-demand web programs are not approved for SW CPE credit.

American Bankers Association Professional Certification (ABA):  PLI’s on-demand web programs may fulfill ABA credit requirements.

 

Related Items

Live Programs  Live Programs

20th Annual Commercial Real Estate Institute (New York, NY) Dec. 3 - 4, 2018
20th Annual Commercial Real Estate Institute (San Francisco, CA) Nov. 8 - 9, 2018
20th Annual Commercial Real Estate Institute (Chicago, IL) Oct. 24 - 25, 2018

Handbook  Course Handbook Archive

20th Annual Commercial Real Estate Institute  
19th Annual Commercial Real Estate Institute Richard C Mallory, Allen Matkins Leck Gamble Mallory & Natsis LLP
Josh M Leavitt, Much Shelist, P.C.
Elliot L Hurwitz, Chicago Title Insurance Company
 
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