TreatiseTreatise

Social Media and the Law

 by Kathryn L. Ossian
 
 Copyright: 2013

 Product Details >> 

Product Details

  • ISBN Number: 9781402420214
  • Page Count: 392
  • Number of Volumes: 1
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  • The purchase of PLI titles may include Basic Upkeep Service, whereby
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In the past few years, more and more individuals and companies have been using social media in every aspect of their personal lives and corporate existences, from keeping up with families and friends for individuals to product research and understanding customer preferences by business entities.

PLI’s Social Media and the Law helps you understand the legal environment and helps you mitigate the risks of using the many new social media platforms.

In Social Media and the Law you’ll learn:

  • The privacy issues presented by social networking sites and what steps users can take to maintain their privacy and limit unwanted third-party access to personal information
  • What copyright issues are raised in the developing social media world, such as who owns and who can use user-generated content on social media sites  
  • The opportunities, and trademark risks, of promoting your brand through social media  
  • Best practices for social media communication to avoid defamation and other tort liability   
  • The unique employment and workplace issues that are raised by and through the use of social media, both by employees and human resources departments
  • How the basic rules of disclosure in advertising apply to advertisements appearing in social  media, including the Federal Trade Commission’s most recent guidance updates
  • How the federal regulation of unsolicited commercial email applies to social media platforms
  • When social media use involves crimes and evidence, and impacts criminal prosecution
  • How social media can and should be considered in creating a civil litigation discovery plan

In a separate chapter on regulated industries, Social Media and the Law discusses the unique issues faced by such industries as:

  • Financial services
  • Broker/dealers
  • Pharmaceutical providers

Essential reading at a time when the legal issues are still evolving, Social Media and the Law minimizes the risk of litigation and other issues while maximizing your comfort level in using the many powerful tools now available through social media platforms.

  Social Media and the Law Table of Contents
Chapter 1: The Social Media Phenomenon
  • § 1:1 : Overview1-2
  • § 1:2 : Popular Forms of Social Media1-2
    • § 1:2.1 : Social Networking Sites1-2
    • § 1:2.2 : Microblogs1-4
    • § 1:2.3 : Social News Sites1-4
    • § 1:2.4 : Social Bookmarking Sites1-5
    • § 1:2.5 : Photo Sharing Sites1-5
    • § 1:2.6 : Video Sharing Sites1-6
  • § 1:3 : Specific Uses of Social Media1-7
    • § 1:3.1 : Marketing and Public Relations1-7
      • [A] : Promoting Goods and Services1-7
      • [B] : Market Research1-7
      • [C] : Damage Control1-8
    • § 1:3.2 : Networking1-8
      • [A] : Messaging1-8
      • [B] : Job Searching and Recruiting1-9
    • § 1:3.3 : Information Sharing and Gathering1-9
      • [A] : Informal Investigations1-9
      • [B] : A Soapbox1-9
  • § 1:4 : Identifying Legal Issues1-10
    • § 1:4.1 : Content Control and Ownership1-10
    • § 1:4.2 : Privacy Considerations1-11
    • § 1:4.3 : Copyrights and Copyright Law1-12
    • § 1:4.4 : Brand Protection and Impersonation1-13
    • § 1:4.5 : Defamation and Other Torts1-14
    • § 1:4.6 : Employment and Workplace Issues1-15
    • § 1:4.7 : Risks for Regulated Industries1-16
    • § 1:4.8 : Advertising Issues1-17
    • § 1:4.9 : Crimes and Litigation1-17
Chapter 2: Privacy; and Appendix 2A
  • § 2:1 : Overview2-2
  • § 2:2 : User Information/Personal Data2-3
    • § 2:2.1 : Overview2-3
    • § 2:2.2 : Data Collection Methods2-3
      • [A] : Web Tracking2-3
      • [B] : Flash Cookies2-4
      • [C] : Single Sign-On2-6
      • [D] : GPS Location-Based Services2-7
      • [E] : Tagging and Facial Recognition Software2-9
      • [F] : Other Methods2-10
    • § 2:2.3 : Third-Party Use of User Information2-10
      • [A] : Marketing and Behavioral Advertising2-10
      • [B] : Use of “Scraped” Data2-12
      • [C] : Use of Data by Decision Makers2-13
      • [D] : Identity Fraud; Impersonation2-14
  • § 2:3 : Protecting User Privacy2-15
    • § 2:3.1 : Social Media Privacy Policies2-15
      • [A] : Typical Policy Clauses2-16
      • [B] : Third-Party Applications and Websites2-17
      • [C] : FTC Enforcement of Social Media’s Compliance with Privacy Policies2-18
    • § 2:3.2 : Privacy Torts2-19
      • [A] : Unreasonable Intrusion upon Another’s Seclusion2-20
      • [B] : Appropriation2-20
      • [C] : Unreasonable Public Disclosure of Private Facts2-21
      • [D] : False-Light Privacy Invasion2-21
  • § 2:4 : Compliance with Privacy/Security Laws2-22
    • § 2:4.1 : Domestic Laws2-22
      • [A] : Federal Laws2-22
        • [A][1] : Electronic Communications Privacy Act2-22
        • [A][2] : Fair Credit Reporting Act2-24
        • [A][3] : Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act2-25
        • [A][4] : Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act2-26
        • [A][5] : Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act2-29
        • [A][6] : Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act2-30
      • [B] : State Laws2-31
        • [B][1] : Data Breach Laws2-31
        • [B][2] : Internet/Online Privacy Laws2-32
      • [C] : FTC Guidelines2-34
      • [D] : Proposed Legislation2-36
    • § 2:4.2 : Foreign Laws2-39
  • § 2:5 : User-Driven Control2-40
    • § 2:5.1 : Privacy Settings2-40
    • § 2:5.2 : Knowing Your “Friends”2-41
    • § 2:5.3 : User Limitation on Disclosure of Information2-41
  • Appendix 2A : State Data Breach Notification LawsApp. 2A-1
Chapter 3: Copyrights, Ownership, and Control of Content
  • § 3:1 : Overview3-2
  • § 3:2 : Copyright Law3-3
    • § 3:2.1 : Subject Matter of Copyright3-3
      • [A] : Protectable Works3-3
        • [A][1] : Originality3-4
        • [A][2] : Fixation3-4
      • [B] : Non-Protectable Works3-4
        • [B][1] : General Ideas or Facts3-4
        • [B][2] : Merger Doctrine3-5
        • [B][3] : Derivative Works3-5
        • [B][4] : ScÒnes à Faire3-5
    • § 3:2.2 : Ownership and Exclusive Rights3-5
      • [A] : Who Owns the Copyright3-5
      • [B] : Registration of Copyright3-6
      • [C] : Bundle of Exclusive Rights3-7
    • § 3:2.3 : “Fair Use” Limitation on Exclusive Rights3-7
      • [A] : Purpose and Character of Use3-8
      • [B] : Nature of the Work3-9
      • [C] : Amount and Substantiality3-9
      • [D] : Effect upon Potential Market3-10
    • § 3:2.4 : Infringement3-10
      • [A] : Direct Liability3-10
      • [B] : Secondary Liability3-11
        • [B][1] : Contributory Infringement3-11
        • [B][2] : Vicarious Infringement3-12
    • § 3:2.5 : Remedies3-13
      • [A] : Monetary Remedies3-13
      • [B] : Injunctive Relief3-14
      • [C] : Criminal Penalties3-14
    • § 3:2.6 : Digital Millennium Copyright Act3-14
      • [A] : Generally3-14
      • [B] : Section 512(c) Safe Harbor3-15
      • [C] : Service Provider Liability3-16
  • § 3:3 : Copyright Issues in the Social Media Context3-16
    • § 3:3.1 : Social Media Sites’ Terms of Use3-16
    • § 3:3.2 : “Fair Use” Doctrine3-19
    • § 3:3.3 : Protectability of Short Works, Tweets3-20
    • § 3:3.4 : Secondary Liability3-21
    • § 3:3.5 : Extraterritoriality3-22
    • § 3:3.6 : Data Scraping3-23
    • § 3:3.7 : DMCA Safe Harbor Protection and Service Provider Liability3-24
    • § 3:3.8 : Protecting Copyright Ownership Rights3-27
      • [A] : Registration of Copyrights3-27
      • [B] : Monitoring/Enforcement3-28
      • [C] : “Takedown” Notices3-28
      • [D] : More Formal Actions3-30
  • § 3:4 : Ownership and Control of User-Generated Social Media Content3-31
    • § 3:4.1 : Ownership of Posted Material3-31
      • [A] : Social Media Sites’ Terms of Use3-31
      • [B] : Social Media in the Employment/Workplace Arena3-31
    • § 3:4.2 : Use by Others of User Content3-31
      • [A] : Express and Implied Licenses3-31
      • [B] : Use by Social Media Site3-32
      • [C] : Use by Third Parties3-33
      • [D] : Use After Content Is Deleted3-34
    • § 3:4.3 : Retrieving and Removing Content3-35
Chapter 4: Trademarks and Brand Protection
  • § 4:1 : Overview4-2
  • § 4:2 : Trademarks4-3
    • § 4:2.1 : Basic Elements of a Trademark4-3
    • § 4:2.2 : Purpose of Trademarks4-4
    • § 4:2.3 : Trademarks Versus Service Marks4-4
    • § 4:2.4 : Protecting Trademarks4-4
      • [A] : Registering Trademarks4-5
      • [B] : Proper Use of Trademarks4-5
      • [C] : Maintaining Registered Trademarks4-6
    • § 4:2.5 : Trademark Infringement4-6
    • § 4:2.6 : Dilution4-7
    • § 4:2.7 : Fair Use and Other Defenses4-7
  • § 4:3 : Trademark Issues in the Social Media Context4-8
    • § 4:3.1 : Trademark Infringement4-9
      • [A] : Twitter’s Trademark Policy4-9
      • [B] : Facebook’s Intellectual Property Policy4-9
      • [C] : Pinterest’s Trademark Policy4-10
    • § 4:3.2 : Impersonation/Confusion4-10
      • [A] : Twitter’s Impersonation Policy4-11
      • [B] : Facebook’s Impostor Policy4-12
    • § 4:3.3 : Username/Handle Squatting4-12
      • [A] : Twitter’s Username Squatting Policy4-13
      • [B] : Facebook’s Username Squatting Policy4-14
    • § 4:3.4 : Commentary, Parody4-14
      • [A] : Twitter’s Parody, Commentary, and Fan Account Policy4-15
      • [B] : Facebook’s Pages Policy4-15
  • § 4:4 : Regulatory Framework4-16
    • § 4:4.1 : Lanham Act4-16
    • § 4:4.2 : Uniform Domain-Name Dispute-Resolution Policy4-17
  • § 4:5 : Practical Steps for Brand Owners4-17
Chapter 5: Defamation, Other Torts, and Related Cybercrimes; and Appendices 5A-5B
  • § 5:1 : Overview5-2
  • § 5:2 : Defamation5-2
    • § 5:2.1 : What Is Defamation?5-2
      • [A] : Libel5-2
      • [B] : Slander5-3
      • [C] : Defamation Per Se5-3
    • § 5:2.2 : Applicable Law5-3
      • [A] : Communications Decency Act5-3
      • [B] : First Amendment Considerations5-4
      • [C] : Case Law5-4
        • [C][1] : Defamation Found or Likely5-4
        • [C][2] : Defamation Not Found5-5
    • § 5:2.3 : Defenses to Defamation5-6
      • [A] : Consent5-6
      • [B] : Absolute Privileges5-6
      • [C] : Conditional Privileges5-7
    • § 5:2.4 : Remedies5-8
      • [A] : Retraction5-8
      • [B] : Cease-and-Desist Letters5-8
      • [C] : Reputation Management5-8
  • § 5:3 : Other Tort Liability5-10
    • § 5:3.1 : Intentional or Negligent Infliction of Emotional Distress5-10
    • § 5:3.2 : False Light Invasion of Privacy5-10
  • § 5:4 : Other Crimes Related to Online Communication5-10
    • § 5:4.1 : Cyberharassment5-10
    • § 5:4.2 : Cyberbullying5-10
    • § 5:4.3 : Applicable Laws5-11
      • [A] : Federal and State Anti-Cyberstalking Statutes5-11
      • [B] : Cyberharassment Statutes5-11
      • [C] : Cyberbullying Statutes5-12
    • § 5:4.4 : Social Media Sites’ Policies and Standards5-12
      • [A] : Facebook5-12
      • [B] : Twitter5-13
      • [C] : YouTube5-13
      • [D] : Google5-14
  • § 5:5 : Best Practices5-14
    • § 5:5.1 : Social Media Policies5-14
    • § 5:5.2 : Cyber Insurance and Media Liability Insurance5-15
  • Appendix 5A : State Cyberstalking and Cyberharassment LawsApp. 5A-1
  • Appendix 5B : Sample Cease-and-Desist LetterApp. 5B-1
Chapter 6: Employment and Workplace Issues Adam S. Forman ~ Miller Canfield
  • § 6:1 : Introduction6-2
  • § 6:2 : Risks and Benefits of Social Media in the Workplace6-4
    • § 6:2.1 : Risks and Costs6-4
    • § 6:2.2 : Benefits6-6
  • § 6:3 : Social Media As a Tool in Hiring and Recruitment6-7
    • § 6:3.1 : Screening Job Applicant’s Social Media Presence/Online Reputation6-7
    • § 6:3.2 : Considerations in Using Job Applicant’s Social Media Information6-8
      • [A] : Applicant’s “Protected Class” Status6-8
      • [B] : Employer’s Affirmative Obligation to Search All Publicly Available Information6-9
      • [C] : Discoverability of Information Collected6-9
      • [D] : Record-Keeping/Retention Requirements6-9
      • [E] : Additional Record-Keeping/Retention Requirements for Federal Contractors6-10
      • [F] : Consumer Reporting Agencies/Background Checks6-10
    • § 6:3.3 : Internet Searches and Social Media in Recruitment6-11
    • § 6:3.4 : Password Protection Statutes6-12
  • § 6:4 : Social Media in Employment/Workplace Actions6-15
    • § 6:4.1 : Types of Claims6-16
      • [A] : Adverse Actions by Employer and Subsequent Discrimination Claims by Employee6-16
      • [B] : Harassment/Hostile Work Environment Claims6-17
      • [C] : Age Discrimination6-20
      • [D] : Retaliation6-21
      • [E] : Ownership of Employer-Sponsored Social Media Accounts6-22
    • § 6:4.2 : Constitutional and Statutory Protections6-24
      • [A] : Protection Under the U.S. Constitution6-24
        • [A][1] : First Amendment6-24
        • [A][2] : Fourth Amendment6-28
        • [A][3] : Fifth Amendment6-32
        • [A][4] : Ninth and Fourteenth Amendments6-32
      • [B] : Protections Under Federal Statutes6-34
        • [B][1] : Electronic Communications Privacy Act6-34
          • [B][1][a] : Title I: “Federal Wiretap Act”6-35
          • [B][1][b] : Title II: “Stored Communications Act”6-36
          • [B][1][c] : Exceptions to ECPA6-38
        • [B][2] : National Labor Relations Act6-40
          • [B][2][a] : Generally6-40
          • [B][2][b] : NLRA and Social Media6-43
            • [B][2][b][i] : Board Decisions6-45
            • [B][2][b][ii] : Other Guidance from the Board6-51
        • [B][3] : Hatch Act6-52
      • [C] : Protection Under State Constitutions6-53
        • [C][1] : Constitutional Provisions6-53
      • [D] : Protections Under State Statutes6-55
        • [D][1] : Anti-Wiretapping and Monitoring Statutes6-55
        • [D][2] : Off-Duty Conduct Statutes6-57
        • [D][3] : Whistleblower Protection Statutes6-59
    • § 6:4.3 : Common Law Torts6-59
    • § 6:4.4 : FTC Regulations Regarding Endorsements6-61
    • § 6:4.5 : Attorney-Client Privilege for Communications via Employer Technology6-61
      • [A] : ABA Guidance6-62
      • [B] : Guidance from Courts on Privilege Issues6-63
        • [B][1] : Cases Finding Communications Were Privileged6-63
        • [B][2] : Cases Finding Communications Not Privileged6-66
      • [C] : Other Considerations6-68
    • § 6:4.6 : Other Privilege for Communications via Employer Technology6-69
  • § 6:5 : Best Practices for Employers6-69
    • § 6:5.1 : Adopt a Comprehensive Social Media Policy6-69
    • § 6:5.2 : Hiring Best Practices6-72
    • § 6:5.3 : Recruitment and Searches Best Practices6-73
    • § 6:5.4 : Adverse Action Best Practices6-73
Chapter 7: Compliance Considerations for Regulated Industries
  • § 7:1 : Overview7-2
  • § 7:2 : Issues Raised by Social Media7-2
    • § 7:2.1 : Regulated Communications7-2
    • § 7:2.2 : Retention of Records7-3
    • § 7:2.3 : Disclosure of Sensitive/Protected Data7-3
  • § 7:3 : Specific Industries and Challenges7-5
    • § 7:3.1 : Publicly Traded Companies7-5
    • § 7:3.2 : Broker-Dealers and Financial Institutions7-7
      • [A] : Public Communications7-7
      • [B] : Third-Party Postings on Social Media Sites7-8
      • [C] : FINRA Record-Retention Requirements7-9
      • [D] : FINRA Suitability Rule7-11
      • [E] : Supervision Requirements7-13
      • [F] : Debt Collection and Credit Report Activities7-15
      • [G] : Guidance on Social Media Use for Financial Institutions7-16
    • § 7:3.3 : Healthcare and Pharmaceutical Industry7-18
      • [A] : Health Data Privacy and Security7-18
      • [B] : Advertising and Disclosures7-19
      • [C] : Online Communications and Third-Party Postings7-20
      • [D] : Requests for Off-Label Information7-21
  • § 7:4 : Future Outlook7-23
Chapter 8: Advertising
  • § 8:1 : Overview8-1
  • § 8:2 : False and Misleading Advertising; Unfair Commercial Practices8-2
    • § 8:2.1 : Regulatory Framework8-2
    • § 8:2.2 : Unfair/Deceptive Acts and Practices Defined8-2
    • § 8:2.3 : Guidance on Advertising Disclosures in Social Media8-3
      • [A] : Federal Trade Commission Guidance8-3
      • [B] : Industry Guidance8-5
  • § 8:3 : Endorsements and Testimonials8-6
    • § 8:3.1 : Federal Trade Commission Guidance8-6
    • § 8:3.2 : Determining When a Recommendation Is an “Endorsement”8-7
    • § 8:3.3 : Truthfulness and Required Disclosures8-9
      • [A] : Liability for False or Misleading Representations8-9
      • [B] : Disclosures Required to Prevent Deception8-11
      • [C] : Disclosure of Non-Typical Results8-15
  • § 8:4 : Unsolicited Electronic Commercial Advertising8-16
    • § 8:4.1 : Key Provisions of CAN-SPAM Act8-16
    • § 8:4.2 : CAN-SPAM Act’s Applicability to Social Media Communications8-17
  • § 8:5 : Retail Communications by Securities Firms8-19
    • § 8:5.1 : FINRA Suitability Rule8-19
    • § 8:5.2 : Advance Approval of Retail Communications8-20
    • § 8:5.3 : Third-Party Postings on Social Media Sites8-21
    • § 8:5.4 : Supervision of Employee Use of Social Media Sites8-22
Chapter 9: Crimes, Prosecution, and Evidence; and Appendices 9A-9E
  • § 9:1 : Overview9-2
  • § 9:2 : Social Media As a Vehicle for Crime9-2
    • § 9:2.1 : Generally9-2
    • § 9:2.2 : Online Harassment9-4
    • § 9:2.3 : Threats9-7
    • § 9:2.4 : Stalking9-9
    • § 9:2.5 : Identity Theft9-10
    • § 9:2.6 : Online Impersonation9-11
    • § 9:2.7 : Flash Mobs and Other Coordinated Acts9-13
  • § 9:3 : Role of Social Media in Law Enforcement/Criminal Investigations9-14
    • § 9:3.1 : Identifying Suspects9-15
    • § 9:3.2 : Undercover/Sting Operations9-15
    • § 9:3.3 : Engaging the Community9-16
    • § 9:3.4 : Apprehending Fugitives9-16
  • § 9:4 : Role of Social Media at Trial9-17
    • § 9:4.1 : Determining Bail9-18
    • § 9:4.2 : Confirming an Alibi9-18
    • § 9:4.3 : Impeaching Witnesses/Testimony9-19
    • § 9:4.4 : Demonstrating Motive9-20
    • § 9:4.5 : Enhancing or Mitigating Sentencing9-20
    • § 9:4.6 : Investigating Jurors9-22
  • § 9:5 : Collecting Social Media Information9-25
    • § 9:5.1 : Independent Research9-25
    • § 9:5.2 : Discovery9-26
    • § 9:5.3 : Subpoena9-28
    • § 9:5.4 : Content Information9-29
    • § 9:5.5 : Non-Content Information9-31
  • § 9:6 : Ethical Issues Arising from Social Media9-31
    • § 9:6.1 : Duty to Investigate9-31
    • § 9:6.2 : Social Media Contact As Ethical Violation9-32
    • § 9:6.3 : Duty to Reveal9-34
    • § 9:6.4 : Duty to Preserve9-35
  • § 9:7 : Getting Information Derived from Social Media Admitted into Evidence9-37
    • § 9:7.1 : Relevance9-37
    • § 9:7.2 : Authentication9-38
    • § 9:7.3 : Hearsay9-42
    • § 9:7.4 : Best-Evidence Rule9-44
    • § 9:7.5 : Unfair Prejudice9-45
  • Appendix 9A : Sample Preservation Request Letter (Law Enforcement)App. 9A-1
  • Appendix 9B : Sample Preservation Request Letter (Defense Counsel)App. 9B-1
  • Appendix 9C : Subpoena Points of ContactApp. 9C-1
  • Appendix 9D : Sample Consent to Examine Social Media AccountApp. 9D-1
  • Appendix 9E : Consent and Authorization to Produce LinkedIn Account InformationApp. 9E-1
Chapter 10: Civil Discovery Issues
  • § 10:1 : Overview10-1
  • § 10:2 : Discovery Strategies10-2
  • § 10:3 : Discoverability of Social Media Information10-3
    • § 10:3.1 : Generally10-3
    • § 10:3.2 : Relevance of Social Media Content10-4
      • [A] : EEOC v. Simply Storage Management, LLC10-7
        • [A][1] : Privacy Concerns10-9
        • [A][2] : Relevance to Claims for Emotional Damages10-9
        • [A][3] : Breadth of Request (in Claims for Emotional Damages)10-9
        • [A][4] : Requests for Social Media Pictures/Photographs10-10
      • [B] : Mackelprang v. Fidelity National Title Agency of Nevada, Inc.10-10
    • § 10:3.3 : Privacy Objections10-11
  • § 10:4 : Discovery via Subpoena10-12
  • § 10:5 : Duty to Preserve10-15
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