Seminar  Seminar

Advanced Trademark Law and Copyright Law Annual Review 2016

Attend Both Programs and SAVE $595!


These two advanced level programs will provide an up-to-the-minute review of current trends and case law impacting the practice of trademark and copyright law today. Essential for corporate and law firm attorneys who specialize or often find themselves involved in trademark and copyright matters, these programs bring together an outstanding expert faculty of practitioners and industry experts who will provide current information on the most recent developments.

To be able to provide the sophisticated, pragmatic advice your clients expect, attend both programs and learn about the latest developments from a group of leading experts!

 

What You Will Learn

Day One: Advanced Trademark Law Annual Review 2016 

  • Overview of important 2015-2016 trademark decisions
  • The impact of In re Tam and other cases on the Lanham Act’s bar on registering immoral, scandalous, or disparaging marks
  • Litigating trademark cases before the International Trade Commission
  • The ethics of a cost-effective trademark prosecution practice
  • TTAB and district court enforcement practice— new rules and B&B Hardware’s impact
  • Protecting the look of a product: trade dress/trademark vs. design patent

Day Two: Advanced Copyright Law Annual Review 2016

  • Fair use: Google Books decision and implications 
  • Music licensing issues
  • Standing to sue and evolving case law
  • Copyright Office: past, present, future
  • DMCA: reform and prospects
  • Key cases in 2015-2016
Advanced Trademark Law Annual Review 2016

Mar. 22, 2016

9:00  Introduction

Speakers: Kieran G. Doyle, Lori L. Wiese-Parks



9:15  Overview of 2015-16 Federal Court, TTAB and UDRP Decisions

  • Federal Court:  Topics to include fair use and the First Amendment, the right of publicity, use in commerce issues, online issues, the protection of foreign trademarks in the U.S., fraud,  trade dress protection, misrepresentation and false advertising, injunctive relief and damages, contempt, initial interest confusion, counterfeits, surveys,  FTC challenges to deceptive and unfair practices
  • TTAB:   Topics to include refusals to register, abusive discovery, bona fide intent to use and bona fide use in commerce, online use as a basis for registration, proof issues, evidence of third party use and third party registrations, the use of expert witnesses, and the effect of B&B Hardware v. Hargis Industries
  • UDRP:  Noteworthy online decisions from the past year

Speaker:  Joseph N. Welch II



10:15  The Lanham Act’s Bar on Registration of Immoral, Scandalous, and Disparaging Marks: A Debate

The practical and societal impact, and constitutionality of the Lanham Act’s bar on registration of marks that “may disparage” and similarly troubling marks. (The Washington Redskins, The Slants, etc.)

  • Have the TTAB and the courts been applying the bar consistently?
  • What is the impact of the Federal Circuit’s decision in In re Tam?
  • Did the court get it right?
  • Can a trademark be political as well as commercial speech?
  • Is it a First Amendment or a Fifth Amendment issue?
  • Is there anything left of the bars on registration of immoral or scandalous marks?

Speaker:  William G. Barber, Kevin Tottis



11:15  Networking Break

11:30  The ITC as an Essential Tool in the IP Enforcement Toolkit

  • Bringing a claim for infringement at the International Trade Commission:
    • Relief
    • Procedure
    • Elements of a claim under section 337
    • Evidentiary standard
    • Discovery
    • Testimony
    • Differences from federal court actions

Speaker:  Sheryl Koval Garko


        Using the ITC to Enforce Trademark Rights

  • Domestic industry requirements in the context of copyrights and trademarks
  • Establishing secondary meaning and infringement
  • Gray market goods
  • The collision of digital copyright and ITC jurisdiction
  • Proving injury in cases involving unregistered marks and unfair competition

Speaker:  Gary J. Rinkerman



12:30  Lunch

1:30  TTAB and District Court Enforcement Practice - Issues and Tips

  • B&B Hardware v. Hargis Industries plus one year: What is the impact?
  • Where to appeal TTAB decisions:  Federal Circuit or U.S. District Court?
  • Understanding the new TTAB rules of practice

Speaker:  Hon. Marvin J. Garbis, Hon. Gerard F. Rogers, J. Christopher Jensen



2:45  Protecting the Look of a Product

  • Trade dress/trademark
  • Design patent
  • Proving secondary meaning

Speaker:  Joshua M. Dalton



3:45  Networking Break

4:00  Potential Ethical Pitfalls in a Modern, Cost-Effective Trademark Prosecution Practice

  • What tasks can be handled by paralegals?
  • What level of supervision is required?
  • Signature issues
  • Double docketing and missed deadlines
  • Fixed-fee billing and the ethics of recording “time” versus tasks
    • Considerations within the firm
    • Considerations in the context of loadstar attorney fee applications
  • The ethics of companies and foreign firms that troll USPTO records and send notices soliciting trademark prosecution, maintenance, and enforcement work

Speakers: Tsan Abrahamson, Katie M. Lachter

5:00  Adjourn



Advanced Copyright Law Annual Review 2016

Mar. 23, 2016

9:00  Introduction

        Richard Dannay



9:15  Google Books

  • The Second Circuit decision and aftermath
  • Fair use in the digital age
  • Future development of "transformative use" concept
  • Reassessing and weighing the four factors
  • What remains of "commercial use"?

         Hillel I. Parness



10:15  Music Licensing Issues

  • Proposed reform of music licensing system
  • Statutory termination of grants
  • Sale or license of digital copies and effect on royalties
  • Due diligence in catalogue sales and acquisitions

         Lisa A. Alter



11:15  Networking Break

11:30  Standing to Sue and Evolving Case Law  

  • Garcia v. Google (9th Cir.) and 16 Casa Duse (2d Cir.): Contributions to larger works
  • Minden Pictures v. John Wiley (9th Cir.): photo agency's standing
  • Section 411(a): Satisfied only by registration or also by pending application?
  • Status of "bare" assignments of past claims
  • Performing rights society enforcement of copyrights; exclusive or nonexclusive rights

          Eleanor M. Lackman



12:30  Lunch

1:45  DMCA: Reform and Prospects

  • Has the DMCA worked?
  • Are there viable alternatives?
  • Fair use within the DMCA notification process; the Lenz case
  • Takedown notices and safe harbors
  • Service provider liability standards and due diligence

            Lateef Mtima



2:45  Copyright Office: Past, Present, Future

  • Calls for modernization, autonomy, and independent agency status
  • Copyright reform for the 21st century
  • Orphan works: problems and solutions
  • Small claims proceedings
  • Registration and proposals for reintroducing renewal formalities

            Joshua L. Simmons



3:45  Networking Break

4:00  Key Cases in 2015 – 2016  

  • Copyrightability
  • Ownership
  • Infringement
  • Defenses
  • Remedies

            Nancy J. Mertzel

 

5:00  Adjourn



Advanced Trademark Law Annual Review 2016
Co-Chair(s)
Kieran G. Doyle ~ Cowan, Liebowitz & Latman, P.C.
Lori L. Wiese-Parks ~ Gray Plant Mooty
Speaker(s)
Tsan Abrahamson ~ Cobalt LLP
William G. Barber ~ Pirkey Barber PLLC
Joshua M. Dalton ~ Morgan Lewis & Bockius LLP
Marvin J. Garbis ~ United States District Judge, United States District Court of Maryland
J. Christopher Jensen ~ Cowan Liebowitz & Latman, P.C.
Sheryl Koval Garko ~ Fish & Richardson
Katie M. Lachter ~ Hinshaw & Culbertson LLP
Gary J. Rinkerman ~ Drinker Biddle & Reath LLP
Hon. Gerard F. Rogers ~ Chief Administrative Trademark Judge, Trademark Trial and Appeal Board, United States Patent and Trademark Office
Kevin Tottis ~ TottisLaw
Joseph N. Welch, II ~ Pattishall, McAuliffe, Newbury, Hilliard & Geraldson LLP
Advanced Copyright Law Annual Review 2016
Chairperson(s)
Richard Dannay ~ Cowan, Liebowitz & Latman, P.C. , Past President, The Copyright Society of the U.S.A.
Speaker(s)
Lisa A. Alter ~ Alter, Kendrick & Baron LLP
Eleanor M. Lackman ~ Cowan DeBaets Abrahams & Sheppard LLP
Nancy J. Mertzel ~ Herrick, Feinstein LLP
Lateef Mtima ~ Professor of Law, Howard University School of Law, Director, Institute for Intellectual Property and Social Justice
Hillel I. Parness ~ Parness Law Firm, PLLC
Joshua L. Simmons ~ Kirkland & Ellis LLP

New York City Seminar Location

PLI New York Center
, 1177 Avenue of the Americas, (2nd floor), entrance on 45th Street, New York, New York 10036. (800) 260-4754.

New York City Hotel Accommodations

Crowne Plaza Times Square Manhattan, 1605 Broadway (at 48th Street), New York, NY 10019 (212) 977-4000. When calling, mention Practising Law Institute. You can also make reservations online to access PLI's rates.

The Muse, 130 West 46th Street, New York, NY 10036. Please call reservations at 1-800-546-7866. When calling, please mention Practising Law Institute and rate code PLII. You can also Book Online- Kimpton.

Millennium Broadway Hotel, 145 West 44th Street, New York, NY 10036. Please call reservations at 1-800-622-5569. When calling, please mention Practising Law Institute. You can also book online.

Hyatt Times Square, 135 W. 45th Street, New York, NY 10036. For reservations, please call (646) 364-1234. When calling mention rate code CR56218 or Practising Law Institute.

Choose A Program

General credit information about this format appears below. For credit information specific to this program, please choose your jurisdiction(s) in the Credit Information box on the right-hand side of this page.


U.S. MCLE States

Alabama: PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Alaska:  All PLI products can fulfill Alaska’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Arizona:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “interactive CLE” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via interactive CLE programs.

Arkansas:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

California:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “participatory” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via participatory programs.

Colorado:  All PLI products can fulfill Colorado’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Delaware:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Florida:  All PLI products can fulfill Florida’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Georgia:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Hawaii:  All PLI products can fulfill Hawaii’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Idaho:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Illinois: All PLI products can fulfill Illinois' CLE requirements for experienced attorneys. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Indiana:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Iowa:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Kansas:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “traditional” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via traditional programs.

Kentucky:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Louisiana:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Maine:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Minnesota:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Mississippi:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Missouri:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Montana:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Nebraska:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Nevada:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

New Hampshire:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

New Jersey:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

New Mexico:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

New York

Experienced Attorneys:  All PLI products can fulfill New York’s CLE requirements for experienced attorneys. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Newly Admitted Attorneys:  PLI’s transitional live seminars can be used to fulfill the requirements for newly admitted attorneys. All credit categories may be earned via transitional live seminars.

North Carolina:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars

North Dakota:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Ohio:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Oklahoma:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Oregon:  All PLI products can fulfill Oregon’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Pennsylvania: PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Puerto Rico:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Rhode Island:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

South Carolina:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Tennessee:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Texas:  All PLI products can fulfill Texas’ CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Utah:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Vermont:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Virgin Islands:  All PLI products can fulfill the Virgin Islands’ CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Virginia:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live interactive” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live interactive programs.

Washington:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

West Virginia:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Wisconsin:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

Wyoming:  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live seminars.

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Quebec (CPD-QC): PLI’s live seminars can fulfill Quebec’s CPD requirements.

Hong Kong (CPD-HK):  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of points an attorney can earn via live seminars.

United Kingdom (CPD-UK):  PLI’s live seminars can fulfill the United Kingdom’s CPD requirements.

Other Credit Types

CPE Credit (NASBA): PLI’s live seminars qualify as “Group-Live delivery” credit.

IRS Continuing Education (IRS-CE): PLI’s live seminars may fulfill IRS-CE requirements. To request IRS-CE credit, please notify PLI at cleadministrator@pli.edu of your request and include your Preparer Tax Identification Number (PTIN).

Certified Fraud Examiner CPE:  PLI’s live seminars may fulfill Certified Fraud Examiner CPE requirements. To request CPE credit or find out which programs offer CPE, please contact PLI at cleadministrator@pli.edu.

IAPP Continuing Privacy Credit (CPE):  PLI’s live seminars may fulfill Privacy CPE credit requirements.

HR Recertification (HRCI):  PLI’s live seminars may fulfill HR credit requirements.

Compliance Certification Board (CCB):  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” training events. There is no limit to the number of credits a candidate or certification holder can earn via live programs.

IIEI Recertification: PLI’s live seminars may qualify for the Continuing Education Units (CEUs) necessary to fulfill the Certified U.S. Export Compliance Officer® (CUSECO) continuing education requirements.

 

These two advanced level programs will provide an up-to-the-minute review of current trends and case law impacting the practice of trademark and copyright law today. Essential for corporate and law firm attorneys who specialize or often find themselves involved in trademark and copyright matters, these programs bring together an outstanding expert faculty of practitioners and industry experts who will provide current information on the most recent developments.

To be able to provide the sophisticated, pragmatic advice your clients expect, attend both programs and learn about the latest developments from a group of leading experts!

 

What You Will Learn

Day One: Advanced Trademark Law Annual Review 2016 

  • Overview of important 2015-2016 trademark decisions
  • The impact of In re Tam and other cases on the Lanham Act’s bar on registering immoral, scandalous, or disparaging marks
  • Litigating trademark cases before the International Trade Commission
  • The ethics of a cost-effective trademark prosecution practice
  • TTAB and district court enforcement practice— new rules and B&B Hardware’s impact
  • Protecting the look of a product: trade dress/trademark vs. design patent

Day Two: Advanced Copyright Law Annual Review 2016

  • Fair use: Google Books decision and implications 
  • Music licensing issues
  • Standing to sue and evolving case law
  • Copyright Office: past, present, future
  • DMCA: reform and prospects
  • Key cases in 2015-2016
Advanced Trademark Law Annual Review 2016

Mar. 22, 2016

9:00  Introduction

Speakers: Kieran G. Doyle, Lori L. Wiese-Parks



9:15  Overview of 2015-16 Federal Court, TTAB and UDRP Decisions

  • Federal Court:  Topics to include fair use and the First Amendment, the right of publicity, use in commerce issues, online issues, the protection of foreign trademarks in the U.S., fraud,  trade dress protection, misrepresentation and false advertising, injunctive relief and damages, contempt, initial interest confusion, counterfeits, surveys,  FTC challenges to deceptive and unfair practices
  • TTAB:   Topics to include refusals to register, abusive discovery, bona fide intent to use and bona fide use in commerce, online use as a basis for registration, proof issues, evidence of third party use and third party registrations, the use of expert witnesses, and the effect of B&B Hardware v. Hargis Industries
  • UDRP:  Noteworthy online decisions from the past year

Speaker:  Joseph N. Welch II



10:15  The Lanham Act’s Bar on Registration of Immoral, Scandalous, and Disparaging Marks: A Debate

The practical and societal impact, and constitutionality of the Lanham Act’s bar on registration of marks that “may disparage” and similarly troubling marks. (The Washington Redskins, The Slants, etc.)

  • Have the TTAB and the courts been applying the bar consistently?
  • What is the impact of the Federal Circuit’s decision in In re Tam?
  • Did the court get it right?
  • Can a trademark be political as well as commercial speech?
  • Is it a First Amendment or a Fifth Amendment issue?
  • Is there anything left of the bars on registration of immoral or scandalous marks?

Speaker:  William G. Barber, Kevin Tottis



11:15  Networking Break

11:30  The ITC as an Essential Tool in the IP Enforcement Toolkit

  • Bringing a claim for infringement at the International Trade Commission:
    • Relief
    • Procedure
    • Elements of a claim under section 337
    • Evidentiary standard
    • Discovery
    • Testimony
    • Differences from federal court actions

Speaker:  Sheryl Koval Garko


        Using the ITC to Enforce Trademark Rights

  • Domestic industry requirements in the context of copyrights and trademarks
  • Establishing secondary meaning and infringement
  • Gray market goods
  • The collision of digital copyright and ITC jurisdiction
  • Proving injury in cases involving unregistered marks and unfair competition

Speaker:  Gary J. Rinkerman



12:30  Lunch

1:30  TTAB and District Court Enforcement Practice - Issues and Tips

  • B&B Hardware v. Hargis Industries plus one year: What is the impact?
  • Where to appeal TTAB decisions:  Federal Circuit or U.S. District Court?
  • Understanding the new TTAB rules of practice

Speaker:  Hon. Marvin J. Garbis, Hon. Gerard F. Rogers, J. Christopher Jensen



2:45  Protecting the Look of a Product

  • Trade dress/trademark
  • Design patent
  • Proving secondary meaning

Speaker:  Joshua M. Dalton



3:45  Networking Break

4:00  Potential Ethical Pitfalls in a Modern, Cost-Effective Trademark Prosecution Practice

  • What tasks can be handled by paralegals?
  • What level of supervision is required?
  • Signature issues
  • Double docketing and missed deadlines
  • Fixed-fee billing and the ethics of recording “time” versus tasks
    • Considerations within the firm
    • Considerations in the context of loadstar attorney fee applications
  • The ethics of companies and foreign firms that troll USPTO records and send notices soliciting trademark prosecution, maintenance, and enforcement work

Speakers: Tsan Abrahamson, Katie M. Lachter

5:00  Adjourn



Advanced Copyright Law Annual Review 2016

Mar. 23, 2016

9:00  Introduction

        Richard Dannay



9:15  Google Books

  • The Second Circuit decision and aftermath
  • Fair use in the digital age
  • Future development of "transformative use" concept
  • Reassessing and weighing the four factors
  • What remains of "commercial use"?

         Hillel I. Parness



10:15  Music Licensing Issues

  • Proposed reform of music licensing system
  • Statutory termination of grants
  • Sale or license of digital copies and effect on royalties
  • Due diligence in catalogue sales and acquisitions

         Lisa A. Alter



11:15  Networking Break

11:30  Standing to Sue and Evolving Case Law  

  • Garcia v. Google (9th Cir.) and 16 Casa Duse (2d Cir.): Contributions to larger works
  • Minden Pictures v. John Wiley (9th Cir.): photo agency's standing
  • Section 411(a): Satisfied only by registration or also by pending application?
  • Status of "bare" assignments of past claims
  • Performing rights society enforcement of copyrights; exclusive or nonexclusive rights

          Eleanor M. Lackman



12:30  Lunch

1:45  DMCA: Reform and Prospects

  • Has the DMCA worked?
  • Are there viable alternatives?
  • Fair use within the DMCA notification process; the Lenz case
  • Takedown notices and safe harbors
  • Service provider liability standards and due diligence

            Lateef Mtima



2:45  Copyright Office: Past, Present, Future

  • Calls for modernization, autonomy, and independent agency status
  • Copyright reform for the 21st century
  • Orphan works: problems and solutions
  • Small claims proceedings
  • Registration and proposals for reintroducing renewal formalities

            Joshua L. Simmons



3:45  Networking Break

4:00  Key Cases in 2015 – 2016  

  • Copyrightability
  • Ownership
  • Infringement
  • Defenses
  • Remedies

            Nancy J. Mertzel

 

5:00  Adjourn



Advanced Trademark Law Annual Review 2016 Advanced Copyright Law Annual Review 2016
Choose A Program
General credit information about this format appears below. For credit information specific to this program, please choose your jurisdiction(s) in the Credit Information box on the right-hand side of this page.

PLI’s live and on-demand webcasts are single-user license products intended for an individual registrant only. Credit will be issued only to the individual registered. If two or more individuals wish to participate in a webcast and receive credit, PLI would be happy to provide a Groupcast – group viewing of a webcast. To schedule a Groupcast, please contact PLI at groupcasts@pli.edu.


U.S. MCLE States

Alabama:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Alaska:  All PLI products can fulfill Alaska’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Arizona:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “interactive CLE” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via interactive CLE programs.

Arkansas:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

California:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “participatory” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via participatory programs.

Colorado:  All PLI products can fulfill Colorado’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Delaware:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Florida:  All PLI products can fulfill Florida’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Georgia:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “in-house” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 in-house credits per reporting period.

Hawaii:  All PLI products can fulfill Hawaii’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Idaho:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Illinois:  All PLI products can fulfill Illinois' CLE requirements for experienced attorneys. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Indiana:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “distance education” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of distance education per reporting period.

Iowa:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Kansas:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “non-traditional” credit. Attorneys are limited to 5 credits of non-traditional programs per reporting period.

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Nebraska:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “computer-based learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 5 credits of computer-based learning per reporting period.

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New Jersey:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “alternative verifiable learning formats” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of alternative verifiable learning formats per reporting period.

New Mexico:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

New York

Experienced Attorneys:  All PLI products can fulfill New York’s CLE requirements for experienced attorneys. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Newly Admitted Attorneys:  PLI’s transitional live webcasts can be used to fulfill the requirements for New York newly admitted attorneys. Ethics credit, professional practice credit, and law practice management credit may be earned via transitional live webcasts. Skills credits may not be earned via live webcasts.

North Carolina:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

North Dakota:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Ohio:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Oklahoma:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Oregon:  All PLI products can fulfill Oregon’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Pennsylvania:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “distance learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of distance learning per reporting period.

Puerto Rico:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “non-traditional” credit. Attorneys are limited to 8 credits of non-traditional programs per reporting period.

Rhode Island:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

South Carolina:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “alternatively delivered” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of alternatively delivered programs per reporting period.

Tennessee:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “distance learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 8 credits of distance learning per reporting period.

Texas:  All PLI products can fulfill Texas’ CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Utah:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Vermont:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Virgin Islands:  All PLI products can fulfill the Virgin Islands’ CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Virginia:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live interactive” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live interactive programs.

Washington:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

West Virginia:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “online” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of online instruction per reporting period.

Wisconsin:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Wyoming:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

CPD Jurisdictions

British Columbia (CPD-BC):  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “real-time” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via real-time programs.

Ontario (CPD-ON):  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “interactive” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via interactive programs.

Quebec (CPD-QC):  PLI’s live webcasts can fulfill Quebec’s CPD requirements.

Hong Kong (CPD-HK):  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “distance learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 15 points of distance learning programs per reporting period.

United Kingdom (CPD-UK):  PLI’s live webcasts can fulfill the United Kingdom’s CPD requirements.

Other Credit Types

CPE Credit (NASBA):  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “Group-Internet-Based” (GIB) credit.

IRS Continuing Education (IRS-CE):  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill IRS-CE requirements. To request IRS-CE credit, please notify PLI at cleadministrator@pli.edu of your request and include your Preparer Tax Identification Number (PTIN).

Certified Fraud Examiner CPE:  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill Certified Fraud Examiner CPE requirements. To request CPE credit or find out which programs offer CPE, please contact PLI at cleadministrator@pli.edu.

IAPP Continuing Privacy Credit (CPE):  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill Privacy CPE credit requirements.

HR Recertification (HRCI):  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill HR credit requirements.

Compliance Certification Board (CCB):  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” training events. There is no limit to the number of credits a candidate or certification holder can earn via live programs.

IIEI Recertification:  PLI’s live webcasts may qualify for the Continuing Education Units (CEUs) necessary to fulfill the Certified U.S. Export Compliance Officer® (CUSECO) continuing education requirements.

 


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