Seminar  Seminar

Counseling Clients in the Entertainment Industry 2016
 
Attend all three days and
SAVE $790!


Day 1 - Overview of Entertainment Law Issues; Television, Video & User-Generated Content; Videogames & Software Apps; Media's Transformation - Over-the-Top Content (OTTs), Multi-channel Networks (MCNs) & Mobile Driven Video; Building an Entertainment Law Practice; Ethics; Cocktail Reception Sponsored by SESAC

The morning session will address high-level issues in entertainment industry transactions, and will cover legal and business issues and emerging trends in the television and video industries, including recent developments involving online video and user-generated content.  The afternoon session will start out by covering media’s transformation including OTT’s, MCN’s & mobile-driven video, the rise of new media companies, and new media business models and economics. Videogames and software app development deals will also be covered, including identifying the parties and their respective interests and taking a look at key negotiating issues from both sides of the table.

Day 2 - Sound Recordings; Music Publishing; Networking Breaks Sponsored by SESAC

The morning will be geared towards a basic understanding of an artist-record company agreement with a mock negotiation as the format, and will address current issues and trends in the record industry including digital distribution of sound recordings. The afternoon session will provide a basic understanding of music publishing terms and concepts, and will include a mock negotiation of an exclusive songwriter agreement.  Both panels will discuss the practical impact and legal implications of the digital delivery of music. 

Day 3 - Book Publishing; Current Developments in Entertainment and Sports Litigation; Film

The morning will provide an overview of book publishing agreements and current developments in the publishing industry, followed by trends and hot topics in sports, entertainment and internet litigation.  The afternoon will provide a basic understanding of motion picture terms and concepts, plus advanced film issues involving financing, production and distribution.
Counseling Clients in the Entertainment Industry 2016 – Overview of Entertainment Law Issues; Television, Video & User-Generated Content; Media's Transformation: OTTs, MCNs & Mobile-Driven Video; Videogames; Building an Entertainment Law Practice; Ethics

Feb. 29, 2016

9:00 Introduction & Overview of Entertainment Law Issues

Kenneth M. Kaufman, Linda A. Newmark

9:15 Television, Video & User-Generated Content
  • Overview of the television and video marketplace
  • Acquisition of underlying rights
  • Option agreements
  • Life story rights
  • Structuring the acquisition of rights (licenses, assignments, and works made for hire)
  • Copyright termination issues
  • Production, financing and distribution agreements
  • Co-productions and joint ventures
  • Cable and pay television productions
  • Talent agreements
  • Special issues in reality TV productions
  • Advertising and product placement
  • Music rights for television productions
  • Key issues involving user-generated content
  • Online and short-form video
  • The impact of digital media on traditional business models
  • Trends and future outlook
Speakers: Vernon G. Chu, Kenneth M. Kaufman, Amaryllis Seabrooks

10:45 Networking Break

11:00 Television, Video & User-Generated Content (Continued)

Speakers: Vernon G. Chu, Kenneth M. Kaufman, Amaryllis Seabrooks

12:30 Lunch

1:45 Media's Transformation - OTTs, MCNs & Mobile-Driven Video
  • The Changing Landscape of Traditional Media
  • The Rise of New Media Companies
  • Major Strategic Moves Connecting the Two
  • New Media Business Models & Economics
Speakers: Jonathan Carson, Peter D. Csathy, Todd Spangler, Elgin M. Thompson, John West

2:45 Networking Break

3:00 Videogames & Software Apps
  • Identifying the parties to the deal - what each wants; what each needs; what each brings
  • Key points of every game or app dev deal.Perspectives and strategies from each side of the table
  • Representing the entrepreneurial games app start-up.Identifying and avoiding fatal mistakes relating to the formation, ownership and financing a start-up business
Speakers: Jim Charne, Helen Ogbara Reeves

5:00 Cocktail Reception provided by SESAC

6:00 Ethical Issues
  • Recent developments in professional responsibility and discipline, e.g., ABA Commission on the Future of Legal Services, ABA “ethics 20/20” rule changes, multijurisdictional and multidisciplinary practice, entity representation, disclosure of client misconduct
  • Conflict of interests for entertainment lawyers and waivers
  • Practicing law in the electronic age – the interface of ethical rules with new technology, e.g., protecting confidential communications and the Internet, metadata discovery and computer experts
  • Fees
  • Good practice guidelines – tips for avoiding legal malpractice and discipline
Speaker: Jack P. Sahl

7:00 Building an Entertainment Law Practice
  • How do you gain enough knowledge and experience starting out in entertainment law?
  • What you need to know about different fields of entertainment law
  • Practicing entertainment law in a secondary market versus a primary market
  • Developing an entertainment practice in challenging economic times
  • General entertainment practitioner versus a specialty practice in entertainment law
  • Serving in non-lawyer roles for clients
  • Fee arrangements
  • Using social media in the entertainment law field 
  • Social media marketing for entertainment lawyers
Speakers: J. Reid Hunter, Kirk T. Schroder

8:00    Adjourn

Counseling Clients in the Entertainment Industry 2016 - Sound Recordings; Music Publishing

Mar. 1, 2016

9:00 Introduction

Kenneth M. Kaufman, Linda A. Newmark

9:15 Sound Recordings
  • Deal points:Artist-record company agreement
  • Discussion of contractual enhancements
  • Consideration of leverage factors
  • The economic reality
  • Record producer-artist agreements
  • Negotiation of artist-record company agreement
  • The sale and delivery of music via the Internet
Speakers: Nicholas C. Ferrara, Julie Swidler

10:30 Networking Break Sponsored by SESAC

10:45 Sound Recordings (Continued)

Speakers: Nicholas C. Ferrara, Julie Swidler

12:30 Lunch

1:45 Music Publishing
  • Types of music publishing agreements
  • Sources of income
  • Negotiation of a songwriter-music publishing agreement
  • Role of performing and mechanical rights societies and agencies
  • Licensing music publishing rights to digital music services
Speakers: Kenneth J. Abdo, Linda A. Newmark, Madhavi Tandon Batliboi, Stephen Dallas

3:15 Networking Break Sponsored by SESAC

3:30 Music Publishing (Continued)

Speakers: Kenneth J. Abdo, Linda A. Newmark, Madhavi Tandon Batliboi, Stephen Dallas

5:00    Adjourn

Counseling Clients in the Entertainment Industry 2016 - Book Publishing; Current Developments in Entertainment and Sports Litigation; Film

Mar. 2, 2016

9:00 Introduction

Kenneth M. Kaufman, Linda A. Newmark

9:15 Book Publishing (& E-Books)
  • Overview of the state of book publishing: On demand and the e-book revolution
  • Key deal points in the publishing contract
  • The role of lawyers and literary agents
  • Update on major legal cases affecting the publishing business
Speakers: Gail Ross, John Schline

10:45 Networking Break

11:00 Current Developments in Entertainment and Sports Litigation


Sports Law:  The Use of Athletes' Images and the Right of Publicity

  • The unclear state of the law
  • The tests courts have used to determine liability
  • The balancing between First Amendment rights and wrongful exploitation
  • Rights of publicity in a professional sports context
  • Rights of publicity in an amateur sports context
  • The dated U.S. Supreme Court right of publicity jurisprudence
  • Pending sports cases likely to set the course of the law in this area
  • Public policy issues
  • Considerations in licensing the right of publicity

 Speakers: Elizabeth A. McNamara, Lateef Mtima


 Current Developments in Mobile, Cloud and Digital/Internet Entertainment

  • The impact of Aereo on cloud, mobile and other applications
  • How the DMCA, CDA, and Secondary Liability Doctrines are being applied to material in the cloud or syndicated to mobile devices
  • Emerging issues with children and the use of mobile devices
  • Mobile marketing/TCPA Liability Risks
  • The hottest cases that litigators and transactional lawyers need to know about in 2015 and beyond
Speaker: Ian C. Ballon

12:30 Lunch

1:45 Film: Key Legal Issues in the Development, Financing, Production & Distribution of Theatrical Motion Pictures
  • Development
    • Hiring a writer: Getting a screenplay written
    • The structure of the writer's agreement
  • Financing
    • Outside the studio: Private and independent financing
    • The studio system: How the studios finance films
    • Other sources of financing: Tax incentives, film funds, foreign sales, crowdfunding, etc.
Moderator: Joseph J. Dapello;  Speakers: Paul Brennan, Alison S. Cohen

3:15 Networking Break

3:30 Film: Key Legal Issues in the Development, Financing, Production & Distribution of Theatrical Motion Pictures (Continued)
  • Production
    • The rights and responsibilities of the director and producer
    • The performers: Money, billing and the perks of employment
    • The meaning of pay-or-play
    • Creative controls, including final cut
    • The role of guilds and unions
  • Distribution
    • Key points in the distribution deal
    • Backend deals
    • The meaning of gross proceeds, adjusted gross, cash breakeven, "true" breakeven and initial actual breakeven
    • Net profits: Do they exist?
    • New frontiers: iTunes, Netflix, Amazon, etc.
Moderator: Joseph J. Dapello;  Speakers: Paul Brennan, Alison S. Cohen

5:00    Adjourn

Counseling Clients in the Entertainment Industry 2016 – Overview of Entertainment Law Issues; Television, Video & User-Generated Content; Media's Transformation: OTTs, MCNs & Mobile-Driven Video; Videogames; Building an Entertainment Law Practice; Ethics
Co-Chair(s)
Kenneth M. Kaufman ~ Manatt, Phelps & Phillips, LLP
Linda A. Newmark ~ Executive Vice President - Head of Acquisitions & Strategic Projects, Universal Music Publishing Group
Speaker(s)
Jonathan Carson ~ Principal, Carson Carson
Jim Charne ~ Gerard Fox Law P.C.
Vernon G. Chu ~ General Counsel, BBC Worldwide Americas, Inc.
Peter D. Csathy ~ CEO, Manatt Digital Media
J. Reid Hunter ~ Serling Rooks Hunter McKoy & Worob LLP
Helen Ogbara Reeves ~ Frankfurt Kurnit Klein & Selz, P.C.
Jack P. Sahl ~ Joseph G. Miller Professor of Law & Director, Miller-Becker Center for Professional Responsibility - University Of Akron School Of Law
Kirk T. Schroder ~ Schroder Davis PLC
Amaryllis Seabrooks ~ Discovery Communications, LLC
Todd Spangler ~ NY Digital Editor, Variety
Elgin Thompson ~ Managing Director, Digital Capital Advisors
John West ~ Founder & CEO, Whistle Sports
Counseling Clients in the Entertainment Industry 2016 - Sound Recordings; Music Publishing
Co-Chair(s)
Kenneth M. Kaufman ~ Manatt, Phelps & Phillips, LLP
Linda A. Newmark ~ Executive Vice President - Head of Acquisitions & Strategic Projects, Universal Music Publishing Group
Speaker(s)
Kenneth J. Abdo ~ Lommen Abdo
Madhavi Tandon Batliboi ~ Commercial Counsel, Google, Inc.
Stephen J. Dallas ~ Vice President, Digital Legal Affairs & Business Development, Warner/Chappell Music, Inc.
Nicholas C. Ferrara ~ Nicholas C. Ferrara & Associates, PLLC
Julie Swidler ~ Executive Vice President, Business Affairs & General Counsel, Sony Music Entertainment
Counseling Clients in the Entertainment Industry 2016 - Book Publishing; Current Developments in Entertainment and Sports Litigation; Film
Co-Chair(s)
Kenneth M. Kaufman ~ Manatt, Phelps & Phillips, LLP
Linda A. Newmark ~ Executive Vice President - Head of Acquisitions & Strategic Projects, Universal Music Publishing Group
Speaker(s)
Ian C. Ballon ~ Greenberg Traurig, LLP
Paul Brennan ~ Bruns, Brennan & Berry, PLLC
Alison Cohen ~ Executive Vice-President, Business & Legal Affairs, FilmNation Entertainment, LLC
Joseph J. Dapello ~ Schreck Rose Dapello & Adams LLP
Elizabeth A. McNamara ~ Davis Wright Tremaine LLP
Lateef Mtima ~ Professor of Law, Howard University School of Law, Director, Institute for Intellectual Property and Social Justice
Gail Ross ~ President, Ross Yoon Agency; Trister Ross Schadler and Gold, PLLC
John Schline ~ Senior Vice President, Corporate Director of Business Affairs, Penguin Random House

New York City Seminar Location

PLI New York Center
, 1177 Avenue of the Americas, (2nd floor), entrance on 45th Street, New York, New York 10036. (800) 260-4754.

New York City Hotel Accommodations

Crowne Plaza Times Square Manhattan, 1605 Broadway (at 48th Street), New York, NY 10019 (212) 977-4000. When calling, mention Practising Law Institute. You can also make reservations online to access PLI's rates.

The Muse, 130 West 46th Street, New York, NY 10036. Please call reservations at 1-800-546-7866. When calling, please mention Practising Law Institute and rate code PLII. You can also Book Online- Kimpton.

Millennium Broadway Hotel, 145 West 44th Street, New York, NY 10036. Please call reservations at 1-800-622-5569. When calling, please mention Practising Law Institute. You can also book online.

Hyatt Times Square, 135 W. 45th Street, New York, NY 10036. For reservations, please call (646) 364-1234. When calling mention rate code CR56218 or Practising Law Institute.

Choose A Program

General credit information about this format appears below. For credit information specific to this program, please choose your jurisdiction(s) in the Credit Information box on the right-hand side of this page.


U.S. MCLE States

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New York

Experienced Attorneys:  All PLI products can fulfill New York’s CLE requirements for experienced attorneys. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

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Quebec (CPD-QC): PLI’s live seminars can fulfill Quebec’s CPD requirements.

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United Kingdom (CPD-UK):  PLI’s live seminars can fulfill the United Kingdom’s CPD requirements.

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Compliance Certification Board (CCB):  PLI’s live seminars qualify as “live” training events. There is no limit to the number of credits a candidate or certification holder can earn via live programs.

IIEI Recertification: PLI’s live seminars may qualify for the Continuing Education Units (CEUs) necessary to fulfill the Certified U.S. Export Compliance Officer® (CUSECO) continuing education requirements.

 

Day 1 - Overview of Entertainment Law Issues; Television, Video & User-Generated Content; Videogames & Software Apps; Media's Transformation - Over-the-Top Content (OTTs), Multi-channel Networks (MCNs) & Mobile Driven Video; Building an Entertainment Law Practice; Ethics; Cocktail Reception Sponsored by SESAC

The morning session will address high-level issues in entertainment industry transactions, and will cover legal and business issues and emerging trends in the television and video industries, including recent developments involving online video and user-generated content.  The afternoon session will start out by covering media’s transformation including OTT’s, MCN’s & mobile-driven video, the rise of new media companies, and new media business models and economics. Videogames and software app development deals will also be covered, including identifying the parties and their respective interests and taking a look at key negotiating issues from both sides of the table.

Day 2 - Sound Recordings; Music Publishing; Networking Breaks Sponsored by SESAC

The morning will be geared towards a basic understanding of an artist-record company agreement with a mock negotiation as the format, and will address current issues and trends in the record industry including digital distribution of sound recordings. The afternoon session will provide a basic understanding of music publishing terms and concepts, and will include a mock negotiation of an exclusive songwriter agreement.  Both panels will discuss the practical impact and legal implications of the digital delivery of music. 

Day 3 - Book Publishing; Current Developments in Entertainment and Sports Litigation; Film

The morning will provide an overview of book publishing agreements and current developments in the publishing industry, followed by trends and hot topics in sports, entertainment and internet litigation.  The afternoon will provide a basic understanding of motion picture terms and concepts, plus advanced film issues involving financing, production and distribution.
Counseling Clients in the Entertainment Industry 2016 – Overview of Entertainment Law Issues; Television, Video & User-Generated Content; Media's Transformation: OTTs, MCNs & Mobile-Driven Video; Videogames; Building an Entertainment Law Practice; Ethics

Feb. 29, 2016

9:00 Introduction & Overview of Entertainment Law Issues

Kenneth M. Kaufman, Linda A. Newmark

9:15 Television, Video & User-Generated Content
  • Overview of the television and video marketplace
  • Acquisition of underlying rights
  • Option agreements
  • Life story rights
  • Structuring the acquisition of rights (licenses, assignments, and works made for hire)
  • Copyright termination issues
  • Production, financing and distribution agreements
  • Co-productions and joint ventures
  • Cable and pay television productions
  • Talent agreements
  • Special issues in reality TV productions
  • Advertising and product placement
  • Music rights for television productions
  • Key issues involving user-generated content
  • Online and short-form video
  • The impact of digital media on traditional business models
  • Trends and future outlook
Speakers: Vernon G. Chu, Kenneth M. Kaufman, Amaryllis Seabrooks

10:45 Networking Break

11:00 Television, Video & User-Generated Content (Continued)

Speakers: Vernon G. Chu, Kenneth M. Kaufman, Amaryllis Seabrooks

12:30 Lunch

1:45 Media's Transformation - OTTs, MCNs & Mobile-Driven Video
  • The Changing Landscape of Traditional Media
  • The Rise of New Media Companies
  • Major Strategic Moves Connecting the Two
  • New Media Business Models & Economics
Speakers: Jonathan Carson, Peter D. Csathy, Todd Spangler, Elgin M. Thompson, John West

2:45 Networking Break

3:00 Videogames & Software Apps
  • Identifying the parties to the deal - what each wants; what each needs; what each brings
  • Key points of every game or app dev deal.Perspectives and strategies from each side of the table
  • Representing the entrepreneurial games app start-up.Identifying and avoiding fatal mistakes relating to the formation, ownership and financing a start-up business
Speakers: Jim Charne, Helen Ogbara Reeves

5:00 Cocktail Reception provided by SESAC

6:00 Ethical Issues
  • Recent developments in professional responsibility and discipline, e.g., ABA Commission on the Future of Legal Services, ABA “ethics 20/20” rule changes, multijurisdictional and multidisciplinary practice, entity representation, disclosure of client misconduct
  • Conflict of interests for entertainment lawyers and waivers
  • Practicing law in the electronic age – the interface of ethical rules with new technology, e.g., protecting confidential communications and the Internet, metadata discovery and computer experts
  • Fees
  • Good practice guidelines – tips for avoiding legal malpractice and discipline
Speaker: Jack P. Sahl

7:00 Building an Entertainment Law Practice
  • How do you gain enough knowledge and experience starting out in entertainment law?
  • What you need to know about different fields of entertainment law
  • Practicing entertainment law in a secondary market versus a primary market
  • Developing an entertainment practice in challenging economic times
  • General entertainment practitioner versus a specialty practice in entertainment law
  • Serving in non-lawyer roles for clients
  • Fee arrangements
  • Using social media in the entertainment law field 
  • Social media marketing for entertainment lawyers
Speakers: J. Reid Hunter, Kirk T. Schroder

8:00    Adjourn

Counseling Clients in the Entertainment Industry 2016 - Sound Recordings; Music Publishing

Mar. 1, 2016

9:00 Introduction

Kenneth M. Kaufman, Linda A. Newmark

9:15 Sound Recordings
  • Deal points:Artist-record company agreement
  • Discussion of contractual enhancements
  • Consideration of leverage factors
  • The economic reality
  • Record producer-artist agreements
  • Negotiation of artist-record company agreement
  • The sale and delivery of music via the Internet
Speakers: Nicholas C. Ferrara, Julie Swidler

10:30 Networking Break Sponsored by SESAC

10:45 Sound Recordings (Continued)

Speakers: Nicholas C. Ferrara, Julie Swidler

12:30 Lunch

1:45 Music Publishing
  • Types of music publishing agreements
  • Sources of income
  • Negotiation of a songwriter-music publishing agreement
  • Role of performing and mechanical rights societies and agencies
  • Licensing music publishing rights to digital music services
Speakers: Kenneth J. Abdo, Linda A. Newmark, Madhavi Tandon Batliboi, Stephen Dallas

3:15 Networking Break Sponsored by SESAC

3:30 Music Publishing (Continued)

Speakers: Kenneth J. Abdo, Linda A. Newmark, Madhavi Tandon Batliboi, Stephen Dallas

5:00    Adjourn

Counseling Clients in the Entertainment Industry 2016 - Book Publishing; Current Developments in Entertainment and Sports Litigation; Film

Mar. 2, 2016

9:00 Introduction

Kenneth M. Kaufman, Linda A. Newmark

9:15 Book Publishing (& E-Books)
  • Overview of the state of book publishing: On demand and the e-book revolution
  • Key deal points in the publishing contract
  • The role of lawyers and literary agents
  • Update on major legal cases affecting the publishing business
Speakers: Gail Ross, John Schline

10:45 Networking Break

11:00 Current Developments in Entertainment and Sports Litigation


Sports Law:  The Use of Athletes' Images and the Right of Publicity

  • The unclear state of the law
  • The tests courts have used to determine liability
  • The balancing between First Amendment rights and wrongful exploitation
  • Rights of publicity in a professional sports context
  • Rights of publicity in an amateur sports context
  • The dated U.S. Supreme Court right of publicity jurisprudence
  • Pending sports cases likely to set the course of the law in this area
  • Public policy issues
  • Considerations in licensing the right of publicity

 Speakers: Elizabeth A. McNamara, Lateef Mtima


 Current Developments in Mobile, Cloud and Digital/Internet Entertainment

  • The impact of Aereo on cloud, mobile and other applications
  • How the DMCA, CDA, and Secondary Liability Doctrines are being applied to material in the cloud or syndicated to mobile devices
  • Emerging issues with children and the use of mobile devices
  • Mobile marketing/TCPA Liability Risks
  • The hottest cases that litigators and transactional lawyers need to know about in 2015 and beyond
Speaker: Ian C. Ballon

12:30 Lunch

1:45 Film: Key Legal Issues in the Development, Financing, Production & Distribution of Theatrical Motion Pictures
  • Development
    • Hiring a writer: Getting a screenplay written
    • The structure of the writer's agreement
  • Financing
    • Outside the studio: Private and independent financing
    • The studio system: How the studios finance films
    • Other sources of financing: Tax incentives, film funds, foreign sales, crowdfunding, etc.
Moderator: Joseph J. Dapello;  Speakers: Paul Brennan, Alison S. Cohen

3:15 Networking Break

3:30 Film: Key Legal Issues in the Development, Financing, Production & Distribution of Theatrical Motion Pictures (Continued)
  • Production
    • The rights and responsibilities of the director and producer
    • The performers: Money, billing and the perks of employment
    • The meaning of pay-or-play
    • Creative controls, including final cut
    • The role of guilds and unions
  • Distribution
    • Key points in the distribution deal
    • Backend deals
    • The meaning of gross proceeds, adjusted gross, cash breakeven, "true" breakeven and initial actual breakeven
    • Net profits: Do they exist?
    • New frontiers: iTunes, Netflix, Amazon, etc.
Moderator: Joseph J. Dapello;  Speakers: Paul Brennan, Alison S. Cohen

5:00    Adjourn

Counseling Clients in the Entertainment Industry 2016 – Overview of Entertainment Law Issues; Television, Video & User-Generated Content; Media's Transformation: OTTs, MCNs & Mobile-Driven Video; Videogames; Building an Entertainment Law Practice; Ethics
Counseling Clients in the Entertainment Industry 2016 - Sound Recordings; Music Publishing
Counseling Clients in the Entertainment Industry 2016 - Book Publishing; Current Developments in Entertainment and Sports Litigation; Film
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U.S. MCLE States

Alabama:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

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Arkansas:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

California:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “participatory” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via participatory programs.

Colorado:  All PLI products can fulfill Colorado’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Delaware:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Florida:  All PLI products can fulfill Florida’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Georgia:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “in-house” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 in-house credits per reporting period.

Hawaii:  All PLI products can fulfill Hawaii’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Idaho:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Illinois:  All PLI products can fulfill Illinois' CLE requirements for experienced attorneys. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Indiana:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “distance education” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of distance education per reporting period.

Iowa:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Kansas:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “non-traditional” credit. Attorneys are limited to 5 credits of non-traditional programs per reporting period.

Kentucky:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Louisiana:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 4 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Maine:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Minnesota:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Mississippi:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “distance learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of distance learning per reporting period.

Missouri:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Montana:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Nebraska:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “computer-based learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 5 credits of computer-based learning per reporting period.

Nevada:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

New Hampshire:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

New Jersey:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “alternative verifiable learning formats” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of alternative verifiable learning formats per reporting period.

New Mexico:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

New York

Experienced Attorneys:  All PLI products can fulfill New York’s CLE requirements for experienced attorneys. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Newly Admitted Attorneys:  PLI’s transitional live webcasts can be used to fulfill the requirements for New York newly admitted attorneys. Ethics credit, professional practice credit, and law practice management credit may be earned via transitional live webcasts. Skills credits may not be earned via live webcasts.

North Carolina:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

North Dakota:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Ohio:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Oklahoma:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Oregon:  All PLI products can fulfill Oregon’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Pennsylvania:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “distance learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of distance learning per reporting period.

Puerto Rico:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “non-traditional” credit. Attorneys are limited to 8 credits of non-traditional programs per reporting period.

Rhode Island:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

South Carolina:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “alternatively delivered” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of alternatively delivered programs per reporting period.

Tennessee:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “distance learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 8 credits of distance learning per reporting period.

Texas:  All PLI products can fulfill Texas’ CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Utah:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Vermont:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Virgin Islands:  All PLI products can fulfill the Virgin Islands’ CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Virginia:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live interactive” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live interactive programs.

Washington:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

West Virginia:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “online” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of online instruction per reporting period.

Wisconsin:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

Wyoming:  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via live webcasts.

CPD Jurisdictions

British Columbia (CPD-BC):  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “real-time” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via real-time programs.

Ontario (CPD-ON):  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “interactive” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via interactive programs.

Quebec (CPD-QC):  PLI’s live webcasts can fulfill Quebec’s CPD requirements.

Hong Kong (CPD-HK):  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “distance learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 15 points of distance learning programs per reporting period.

United Kingdom (CPD-UK):  PLI’s live webcasts can fulfill the United Kingdom’s CPD requirements.

Other Credit Types

CPE Credit (NASBA):  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “Group-Internet-Based” (GIB) credit.

IRS Continuing Education (IRS-CE):  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill IRS-CE requirements. To request IRS-CE credit, please notify PLI at cleadministrator@pli.edu of your request and include your Preparer Tax Identification Number (PTIN).

Certified Fraud Examiner CPE:  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill Certified Fraud Examiner CPE requirements. To request CPE credit or find out which programs offer CPE, please contact PLI at cleadministrator@pli.edu.

IAPP Continuing Privacy Credit (CPE):  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill Privacy CPE credit requirements.

HR Recertification (HRCI):  PLI’s live webcasts may fulfill HR credit requirements.

Compliance Certification Board (CCB):  PLI’s live webcasts qualify as “live” training events. There is no limit to the number of credits a candidate or certification holder can earn via live programs.

IIEI Recertification:  PLI’s live webcasts may qualify for the Continuing Education Units (CEUs) necessary to fulfill the Certified U.S. Export Compliance Officer® (CUSECO) continuing education requirements.

 


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