TreatiseTreatise

Pro Bono Service by In-House Counsel: Strategies and Perspectives

 by David P Hackett
 
 Copyright: 2010

 Product Details >> 

Product Details

  • ISBN Number: 9781402414824
  • Page Count: 544
  • Number of Volumes: 1
  •  

“Offers essential guidance as to why such pro bono services should be undertaken, how such programs should be structured, examples of such programs, lessons learned, and tips for service providers, lawyers, and clients.”
— Judge Robert A. Katzmann, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit

Pro bono service in corporations, once unusual, is now the norm. Gathering together the wide-ranging experiences of in-house corporate counsel, this practical guide shows you how to start, maintain, and expand company pro bono legal services. It offers essential guidance as to why pro bono services should be undertaken and how they should be structured, and provides examples of pro bono programs, lessons learned, and tips for service providers, lawyers, and clients.
  Foreword
  Preface
  Prologue
  Table of Contents
Chapter 1: Getting to the Heart of the Corporation: Effective Pro Bono Strategies
  • § 1:1 : Introduction9
  • § 1:2 : A New Level of Involvement10
  • § 1:3 : How to Start12
  • § 1:4 : Some Examples of Service15
    • § 1:4.1 : Helping a Not-for-Profit Organization15
    • § 1:4.2 : What Some Large Companies Are Doing15
    • § 1:4.3 : Small Legal Departments16
  • § 1:5 : Overcoming Some Typical Obstacles16
    • § 1:5.1 : Licenses16
      • [A] : Partnering with Licensed Attorneys17
      • [B] : Projects That Do Not Require a License17
      • [C] : Educational Activities17
    • § 1:5.2 : Malpractice17
    • § 1:5.3 : Conflicts18
  • § 1:6 : Conclusion18
Chapter 2: In-House Counsel Pro Bono Programs
  • § 2:1 : Introduction24
  • § 2:2 : Factors that Affect Participation by In-House Counsel24
  • § 2:3 : Reasons to Launch an In-House Pro Bono Program28
  • § 2:4 : Issues to Consider in Implementing an In-House Pro Bono Program33
    • § 2:4.1 : Nature of Pro Bono Work33
    • § 2:4.2 : Nature and Scope of Pro Bono Commitment37
    • § 2:4.3 : Conflicts-of-Interest Checks39
    • § 2:4.4 : The Approval Process42
    • § 2:4.5 : Insurance Coverage43
    • § 2:4.6 : Use of Company Resources44
  • § 2:5 : Launching an In-House Pro Bono Program45
    • § 2:5.1 : Announcement and Publicity45
    • § 2:5.2 : Hosting CLE and Other Events45
    • § 2:5.3 : Informational Listserv and Corporate Intranet Postings46
    • § 2:5.4 : Frequently Asked Questions46
    • § 2:5.5 : Resources for Pro Bono Programs48
  • § 2:6 : Administration of an In-House Counsel Pro Bono Program49
    • § 2:6.1 : Company Pro Bono Coordinator49
    • § 2:6.2 : Methods of Pro Bono Service50
    • § 2:6.3 : Monitoring and Feedback52
  • § 2:7 : Conclusion55
Chapter 3: In-House Counsel: The New Face of Pro Bono
  • § 3:1 : Introduction58
  • § 3:2 : Forces Behind the Current Explosion of Interest in In-House Pro Bono59
    • § 3:2.1 : Corporate Social Responsibility59
    • § 3:2.2 : Diversity61
    • § 3:2.3 : Heightened Stature of In-House Counsel61
    • § 3:2.4 : Benchmarking Peer Departments62
    • § 3:2.5 : Impact of the Pro Bono Revolution Among Major Law Firms62
  • § 3:3 : Addressing Obstacles to In-House Pro Bono63
    • § 3:3.1 : Multijurisdictional Practice63
    • § 3:3.2 : Malpractice Insurance65
    • § 3:3.3 : Conflicts of Interest66
    • § 3:3.4 : Transferable Skills Sets66
    • § 3:3.5 : Time Constraints67
  • § 3:4 : Current State of Pro Bono in Legal Departments68
    • § 3:4.1 : Broadened Participation68
    • § 3:4.2 : Signature Projects Versus “Cafeteria” Pro Bono69
    • § 3:4.3 : New Service Models70
    • § 3:4.4 : Integration with CSR Efforts71
    • § 3:4.5 : Pro Bono Partnerships and Collaborations71
    • § 3:4.6 : Global Pro Bono71
    • § 3:4.7 : Bringing Corporate Culture to Pro Bono72
    • § 3:4.8 : In-House Pro Bono and the “Great Recession”72
  • § 3:5 : Future of Corporate Pro Bono73
Chapter 4: Caterpillar’s Use of 6 Sigma to Evaluate, Develop, and Implement a Program
  • § 4:1 : Introduction75
  • § 4:2 : What Is 6 Sigma?76
  • § 4:3 : Caterpillar Adopts 6 Sigma78
  • § 4:4 : Developing the Business Case for Pro Bono (Project Charters)79
  • § 4:5 : Organizing the Team82
  • § 4:6 : Regulatory Hurdles84
  • § 4:7 : Malpractice Review87
  • § 4:8 : Voice of the Business88
  • § 4:9 : Integrating the Voice of the Business with the Voice of the Customer91
  • § 4:10 : Setting the Structure94
  • § 4:11 : Developing Metrics: What Is Success?96
  • § 4:12 : Conclusion98
Chapter 5: Ethical Considerations in Pro Bono Representation
  • § 5:1 : Background102
  • § 5:2 : Expectations About Pro Bono Service104
  • § 5:3 : Duty to Engage in Competent Representation107
  • § 5:4 : Vetting Prospective Pro Bono Representations108
  • § 5:5 : Checking for Conflicts of Interest109
    • § 5:5.1 : Types of Conflicts109
      • [A] : Concurrent Conflicts109
      • [B] : Positional or Issue Conflicts113
      • [C] : Personal Conflicts113
    • § 5:5.2 : Resolving Conflicts114
    • § 5:5.3 : Conflicts Issues in Short-Term Limited Scope Representations115
  • § 5:6 : Avoiding Unauthorized Practice of Law118
  • § 5:7 : Identifying the Client120
  • § 5:8 : Engagement Letters121
  • § 5:9 : Confidentiality Among Referring Nonprofits and Clients122
  • § 5:10 : Advancing Expenses in Pro Bono Litigation123
  • § 5:11 : Conclusion124
Chapter 6: CitiLegal Pro Bono Initiative
  • § 6:1 : Introduction128
  • § 6:2 : The Setting: Differences Between Corporations and Law Firms129
  • § 6:3 : Starting an In-House Pro Bono Program132
    • § 6:3.1 : Recognizing the Impact of Geographic Location132
    • § 6:3.2 : Establishing a Governance Structure133
    • § 6:3.3 : Progressing Without a Dedicated Staff or Budget133
    • § 6:3.4 : Coordinating with Other Corporate Volunteer Initiatives134
    • § 6:3.5 : Identifying and Addressing Potential Conflicts134
  • § 6:4 : Attracting In-House Volunteers135
    • § 6:4.1 : Maintaining the Work-Life Balance136
    • § 6:4.2 : Leverage Extensive Experience136
    • § 6:4.3 : Create Transactional or Other Nonlitigation Opportunities137
    • § 6:4.4 : Help Build Culture and Identity138
    • § 6:4.5 : Involve Nonpracticing Lawyers138
  • § 6:5 : Structuring In-House Pro Bono Projects138
    • § 6:5.1 : Identifying Opportunities138
    • § 6:5.2 : Partnering with Law Firms and Legal Service Organizations139
      • [A] : Resources and Organizational Support140
      • [B] : Training and Expertise140
    • § 6:5.3 : Organizing One-Day Events141
    • § 6:5.4 : Facilitating Ongoing Projects (Short- and Long-Term)142
    • § 6:5.5 : Acknowledging the Effect of Size and Location of Volunteer Pool142
    • § 6:5.6 : Managing Expectations143
    • § 6:5.7 : Creating Opportunities to Interact with Colleagues144
  • § 6:6 : From Successful Projects to Sustained Programs144
    • § 6:6.1 : Strong Governance Structure145
    • § 6:6.2 : Role of Middle Managers146
    • § 6:6.3 : Widespread and Frequent Communication146
    • § 6:6.4 : Coordination with Established Corporate Initiatives147
  • § 6:7 : Challenges for the Future148
    • § 6:7.1 : Find Better Ways to Track and Measure Progress148
    • § 6:7.2 : Expand Opportunities and Focus on Client Impact148
    • § 6:7.3 : Develop Work in Smaller Cities and Other Countries149
    • § 6:7.4 : Leverage Volunteers from Other In-House Professions149
Chapter 7: American Express’s In-House Pro Bono Program
  • § 7:1 : Introduction152
  • § 7:2 : Starting the Program153
    • § 7:2.1 : Assessing Employee Interest153
    • § 7:2.2 : Executive Sponsorship154
      • [A] : The “Why”154
      • [B] : Grassroots Support155
      • [C] : It’s Official!156
      • [D] : Leading by Example156
      • [E] : Ensuring Follow-Through157
    • § 7:2.3 : Defining Program Parameters157
      • [A] : What Is Pro Bono?157
      • [B] : Who Can Perform Pro Bono Service?157
      • [C] : Formal Pro Bono Policy158
      • [D] : Alignment with Philanthropic Organizations and Foundations159
      • [E] : Establishing a Pro Bono Committee159
      • [F] : Pro Bono Time Tracker160
    • § 7:2.4 : Insurance160
    • § 7:2.5 : Identifying Pro Bono Matters161
    • § 7:2.6 : Conflict Checks162
    • § 7:2.7 : Engagement Letters162
    • § 7:2.8 : Partnering with Law Firms162
  • § 7:3 : Keeping the Program Going163
    • § 7:3.1 : Maintaining Volunteer Interest163
      • [A] : Communications163
      • [B] : Contests165
      • [C] : Pro Bono Fair166
      • [D] : Continuing Legal Education Seminars167
    • § 7:3.2 : Ongoing Activities167
      • [A] : Time Tracking167
      • [B] : Committee Meetings and Roles167
      • [C] : Funding168
      • [D] : Keeping Up with Partners and Community168
      • [E] : Programming169
  • § 7:4 : Straight from the Workhorse’s Mouth170
    • § 7:4.1 : Questions You’ve Had, But Never Wanted to Ask About Pro Bono171
    • § 7:4.2 : Trials and Errors173
    • § 7:4.3 : Why We Do What We Do: Some Stories174
  • Appendix 7A : American Express’s Pro Bono Committee Participation Survey177
  • Appendix 7B : Roles of American Express’s Pro Bono Committee179
  • Appendix 7C : Elements of American Express’s Pro Bono Policy181
  • Appendix 7D : American Express’s Pro Bono Program—New Engagement Checklist183
  • Appendix 7E : American Express’s Sample Engagement Letter185
  • Appendix 7F : American Express’s Instructions on How to Take on a Matter (The 4 Easy Steps)187
Chapter 8: AOL’s Pro Bono Program
  • § 8:1 : Introduction189
  • § 8:2 : Do We Really Want to Do This?190
  • § 8:3 : OK, but We Can’t Do This by Ourselves195
  • § 8:4 : How Do We Put This in Writing?198
  • § 8:5 : How We Rolled Out Our Program200
    • § 8:5.1 : Starting Our Monthly Clinic200
    • § 8:5.2 : Training201
    • § 8:5.3 : The Clinic in Operation203
    • § 8:5.4 : Clinic Follow-Up204
  • § 8:6 : Practice Pointers205
  • § 8:7 : Keeping Up the Momentum207
  • Appendix 8A : Request for Proposal—Pro Bono Partnership209
  • Appendix 8B : AOL Legal Department Pro Bono Policy213
  • Appendix 8C : Memorandum of Understanding Between AOL LLC and McGuireWoods LLP223
  • Appendix 8D : Pro Bono Application Form227
  • Appendix 8E : Fairfax Bar Pro Bono Form229
Chapter 9: Pro Bono Service at General Electric
  • § 9:1 : GE’s Legal Organization in Europe231
  • § 9:2 : Challenges232
  • § 9:3 : Addressing the Challenges234
Chapter 10: In-House Pro Bono at LexisNexis
  • § 10:1 : Introduction237
  • § 10:2 : Corporate Social Responsibility and Pro Bono238
  • § 10:3 : Why We Do Pro Bono241
  • § 10:4 : Establishing an In-House, Company-Wide Program243
  • § 10:5 : Conclusion248
  • Appendix 10A : LexisNexis Group Pro Bono Policy249
Chapter 11: An International Perspective from Starbucks
  • § 11:1 : Introduction257
  • § 11:2 : The Pro Bono Tradition at Starbucks258
  • § 11:3 : Approaching the Project As In-House Counsel259
  • § 11:4 : Importance of Working with Outside Counsel260
  • § 11:5 : Diversity and Teamwork261
  • § 11:6 : Cultural Perspective262
  • § 11:7 : Project Management263
    • § 11:7.1 : Formulating Objectives263
    • § 11:7.2 : Allocation of Component Tasks264
    • § 11:7.3 : Project Coordinator265
    • § 11:7.4 : Preparing the Memorandum265
    • § 11:7.5 : Client Feedback266
    • § 11:7.6 : Debriefing267
    • § 11:7.7 : Celebrating Success267
  • § 11:8 : Trainee Lawyer Perspective268
  • § 11:9 : Conclusion269
Chapter 12: Accenture’s Legal Corporate Citizenship Program
  • § 12:1 : Origins of the Program271
  • § 12:2 : Collaborations with Law Firms273
  • § 12:3 : Conclusion275
Chapter 13: Intel’s Gardening Guide to Growing a Corporate Pro Bono Program
  • § 13:1 : Seed Planted: Genesis of Intel’s Program280
  • § 13:2 : Fertile Soil: Intel’s Corporate Culture of Volunteerism281
  • § 13:3 : Cultivation: Program Formation282
    • § 13:3.1 : Weeding the Varietals: Survey Results and Focusing Our Program283
    • § 13:3.2 : A Look into the Neighbors’ Gardens: Benchmarking284
    • § 13:3.3 : Structuring the Plot: Formalizing the Pro Bono Program and Logistics285
  • § 13:4 : Fruits of Labor: Helping Clients and Other Success Stories289
    • § 13:4.1 : Planting Initial Crops: Programs Across the United States289
    • § 13:4.2 : Cultivating Resources: Selecting Teams290
      • [A] : Legal Aid Agency Partnering290
      • [B] : Law Firm Partnering291
    • § 13:4.3 : Harvesting Initial Crops: Specifics from the Sites292
      • [A] : Santa Clara, California Site (San Francisco Area)292
      • [B] : Folsom, California Site (Sacramento Area)293
      • [C] : Hillsboro, Oregon Site (Portland Area)295
      • [D] : Chandler, Arizona Site (Phoenix Area)296
    • § 13:4.4 : Periodic Pruning and Fertilizing:Issues Along the Way297
      • [A] : Program Details: Start with a Policy and Tools or Develop Along the Way?297
      • [B] : Program Promotion: Maintaining Interest and Visibility298
      • [C] : Jurisdiction Issues: Influencing the Oregon State Bar Rules298
  • § 13:5 : Care and Feeding: Sustaining and Expanding the Program299
    • § 13:5.1 : Rotating the Crops: Goal Setting and New Directions299
    • § 13:5.2 : New Leadership: Assistant GC as Executive Sponsor301
    • § 13:5.3 : New Fields: Expansion of Program to “Virtual” Volunteers301
  • § 13:6 : Future Crops: Going Forward302
  • Appendix 13A : Pro Bono Survey305
  • Appendix 13B : Legal Wiki Sample309
Chapter 14: From Ad Hoc to Business As Usual: Pro Bono at Deloitte
  • § 14:1 : Rethinking Pro Bono313
  • § 14:2 : Evolution of Deloitte’s Program315
  • § 14:3 : A New Era317
  • § 14:4 : Treating Nonprofits Like Paying Clients323
  • § 14:5 : Pro Bono at Deloitte Today326
    • § 14:5.1 : A Wide Range of Services326
    • § 14:5.2 : Example: A Risk Management Project327
    • § 14:5.3 : Example: Improving Access to College328
    • § 14:5.4 : Celebrating a Longstanding Commitment330
  • § 14:6 : What Deloitte Has Learned331
    • § 14:6.1 : Finding the Right Project331
    • § 14:6.2 : Driving the Right Process331
  • § 14:7 : Evaluating the Program332
  • § 14:8 : What’s Next?334
Chapter 15: Ernst & Young: Building a Better Future for Our Communities and Our Own Organization
  • § 15:1 : Introduction338
  • § 15:2 : Mobilizing a Global Cadre of Skills-Based Volunteers338
  • § 15:3 : Education339
    • § 15:3.1 : Australia: Business Community Offers Partners in Learning Program339
    • § 15:3.2 : United States: College MAP340
    • § 15:3.3 : South Africa: Schools’ Partnership341
  • § 15:4 : Entrepreneurship341
    • § 15:4.1 : Sri Lanka: BizPAct341
    • § 15:4.2 : France and the World: PlaNet Finance342
    • § 15:4.3 : Social Entrepreneur of the Year343
  • § 15:5 : The Environment344
    • § 15:5.1 : Americas: Greening the Planet While Developing Our Own Capabilities in Sustainability Services344
    • § 15:5.2 : UK: Creating Green Thinkers to Reduce Our Environmental Footprint345
    • § 15:5.3 : Japan: Developing the Next Generation of Environmental Leaders346
  • § 15:6 : Why Put So Much Energy into Corporate Responsibility?347
Chapter 16: Lessons from Microsoft’s Immigrant and Refugee Rights Programs
  • § 16:1 : Origins of the Programs351
  • § 16:2 : Volunteer Advocates for Immigrant Justice (VAIJ)354
    • § 16:2.1 : Partnering355
    • § 16:2.2 : Optimizing the Volunteer Experience356
      • [A] : Preparation356
      • [B] : Matching Volunteers with Experiences359
      • [C] : Mentoring and Teaming361
  • § 16:3 : Kids in Need of Defense (KIND)363
Chapter 17: Corporate Counsel Pro Bono Coordinators:A Model for an In-House Legal Community
  • § 17:1 : Introduction372
  • § 17:2 : Reasons for Pro Bono Service373
  • § 17:3 : Formation of CCPBC374
    • § 17:3.1 : Name and Mission Statement375
    • § 17:3.2 : Governing Body376
    • § 17:3.3 : Budget376
    • § 17:3.4 : Areas of Focus376
  • § 17:4 : Current Activities378
    • § 17:4.1 : Executive Committee Meetings378
    • § 17:4.2 : Membership379
    • § 17:4.3 : Events379
  • § 17:5 : Best Practices: How to Start a CCPBC in Your Area381
  • § 17:6 : Lessons Learned383
  • Appendix 17A : In-House Counsel Public Service Initiative385
  • Appendix 17B : Corporate Counsel Pro Bono Coordinators: Mission Statement387
  • Appendix 17C : Corporate Counsel Pro Bono Coordinators: Frequently Asked Questions389
Chapter 18: Strategic Partnerships at Ashoka
  • § 18:1 : A New Generation of Entrepreneurs395
  • § 18:2 : Ashoka’s Vision: “Everyone a Changemaker”397
  • § 18:3 : The Role of Corporations in Social Impact399
  • § 18:4 : Benefits of Corporate Pro Bono402
    • § 18:4.1 : Benefits to the Citizen Organization403
    • § 18:4.2 : Benefits to the Volunteer404
    • § 18:4.3 : Benefits to the Corporation404
    • § 18:4.4 : Benefits to the Business and Citizen Sectors405
  • § 18:5 : Challenges and Best Practices406
    • § 18:5.1 : Time Pressure406
    • § 18:5.2 : Level of Commitment407
    • § 18:5.3 : Level of Skills408
    • § 18:5.4 : Partnerships408
  • § 18:6 : Ensuring Corporate Pro Bono Success409
  • § 18:7 : Examples of Ashoka’s Strategic Partnerships411
    • § 18:7.1 : Case Study: Corporate Executive Board411
    • § 18:7.2 : Case Study: McKinsey & Company413
  • § 18:8 : Conclusion414
Chapter 19: Concern Worldwide: Taking Risks and Building Strategic Partnerships on the Road to Innovation
  • § 19:1 : Introduction417
  • § 19:2 : Concern’s Mission419
  • § 19:3 : Concern’s Strategic, Integrative Approach420
    • § 19:3.1 : Engaging Community Resources to Solve Problems420
    • § 19:3.2 : Problem-Solving Through Collaborative Community Empowerment422
    • § 19:3.3 : Enlisting the Private Sector in Creative Problem-Solving424
    • § 19:3.4 : Enticing Collaboration by Philanthropists and Lawyers427
    • § 19:3.5 : Leveraging Companies’ Corporate Social Responsibility Initiatives429
  • § 19:4 : Assessment of the Impact, Replication, and Scale430
Chapter 20: Pro Bono Teaming
  • § 20:1 : Introduction433
  • § 20:2 : Types of Teams434
    • § 20:2.1 : Partnerships with Public Interest Organizations434
    • § 20:2.2 : Teams of In-House and Outside Lawyers436
  • § 20:3 : Utility of In-House Counsel and Law Firm Teaming Arrangements436
  • § 20:4 : Suitability of Matters for Teaming Arrangements437
  • § 20:5 : Strategic Formation and Implementation of Teaming Arrangements439
    • § 20:5.1 : The Pro Bono Opportunity439
    • § 20:5.2 : Size and Components of the Team440
  • § 20:6 : Progression of the Teaming Arrangement442
    • § 20:6.1 : Shifting the Relationship Dynamics442
    • § 20:6.2 : Engaging in Collaborations442
    • § 20:6.3 : Communications in the Teaming Arrangement443
    • § 20:6.4 : The Project Leader444
    • § 20:6.5 : Teammates’ Expectations445
  • § 20:7 : Ancillary Benefits of Teaming Arrangements446
Appendix: Guidelines for Pro Bono Representations
  Index

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“[Pro Bono Service by In-House Counsel: Strategies and Perspectives] will offer essential guidance as to why such pro bono services should be undertaken, how such programs should be structured, examples of such programs, lessons learned, and tips for service providers, lawyers, and clients.”
Judge Robert A. Katzmann, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit


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