TreatiseTreatise

Kane on Trademark Law: A Practitioner's Guide (6th Edition)

 by Siegrun D. Kane
 
 Copyright: 2013-2016
 Last Updated: June 2016

 Product Details >> 

Product Details

  • ISBN Number: 9781402420665
  • Page Count: 1074
  • Number of Volumes: 1
  •  
  • The purchase of PLI titles may include Basic Upkeep Service, whereby supplements, replacement pages and new editions may be shipped to you immediately upon publication for a 30-day examination. This service is cancelable at any time.

Written by one of the nation’s foremost trademark practitioners, the sixth edition of Kane on Trademark Law tells you everything you need to know about trademark issues and tactics—all in one convenient, easy-to-read volume with a searchable flash drive.

How do your facts stack up against the cases? Kane on Trademark Law, Sixth Edition will not only tell you with illustrative lists of cases on both sides of all major trademark issues, but will show you with full-color illustrations of previously litigated marks.

Kane on Trademark Law provides court-tested practical suggestions, including how to:

  • spot potential conflicts and save searching time and expense with effective shortcuts
  • overcome common descriptiveness rejections
  • update or amend registrations based on changes in the mark
  • prepare for depositions and prepare your deponents for the ordeal ahead.

Kane on Trademark Law will also bring you the latest on:

  • Disparagement: Is Section 2(a) of the Lanham Act constitutional? The arguments are laid out in the Washington Redskins appeal to the 4th Circuit and The Slants en banc appeal to the Federal Circuit. Will the Supreme Court be next?
  • Preclusion: The Supreme Court in B&B Hardware v. Hargis held that a TTAB decision finding likely confusion precludes relitigation of the issue in district court when the TTAB takes into account market-place usage of the parties’ marks. Will B&B impact typical TTAB proceedings?
  • Issues for the Court or Jury? The Supreme Court in Hana Bank held that a jury composed of ordinary consumers is better suited than the court to decide the issue of tacking. Are jurors also better suited to decide the issues of likely confusion and abandonment?
  • Irreparable Harm: Is the presumption of irreparable harm still viable in trademark preliminary injunction actions?
  • Attorneys Fees: Should the Supreme Court Octane Decision Relaxing the Standard for Fee Awards in “Exceptional” Patent Cases Apply to “Exceptional” Trademark Cases?
  • Internet Issues: The latest on discovery and social media, ICANN domain names and gTLDS.
  • The 1st Amendment defense to parody, false endorsement and competitors’ negative comments.

Plus you get easy access to key forms, step-by-step checklists and excerpts from key statutes.

  Table of Contents
Chapter 1: Introduction
  • § 1:1 : The Basics1-2
    • § 1:1.1 : What Is a Trademark?1-2
    • § 1:1.2 : Trademark Versus Service Mark1-3
    • § 1:1.3 : Trademark Versus Trade Name1-4
    • § 1:1.4 : Certification and Collective Marks1-4
    • § 1:1.5 : Relation Between Trademarks and Other Intellectual Property Rights1-5
      • [A] : Trademarks and Unfair Competition1-5
      • [B] : Patents1-6
      • [C] : Copyrights1-6
      • [D] : Trademarks, Patents, and Copyrights Compared1-7
      • [E] : Use As Essential to Trademark Protection: Use It or Lose It1-8
  • § 1:2 : Overview of Trademark Law1-8
    • § 1:2.1 : Purpose of Trademarks1-8
      • [A] : Identify Origin1-8
      • [B] : Quality Assurance1-9
      • [C] : Symbols of Goodwill1-10
  • § 1:3 : The Legal Framework1-11
    • § 1:3.1 : Consumer Protection: The Likelihood of Confusion Standard1-12
      • [A] : Kinds of Confusion1-12
      • [B] : The Average Purchaser1-13
    • § 1:3.2 : Beyond Confusion: Protection of Trademark Owner’s Goodwill from Dilution1-14
    • § 1:3.3 : The Equitable Nature of Trademark Rights: Bad Guys Finish Last1-15
Chapter 2: Selecting a Trademark
  • § 2:1 : Trademark Categories2-2
    • § 2:1.1 : Generic2-3
    • § 2:1.2 : Descriptive2-5
      • [A] : Secondary Meaning2-7
    • § 2:1.3 : Deceptive/Misdescriptive2-8
    • § 2:1.4 : Suggestive2-9
    • § 2:1.5 : Arbitrary and Fanciful2-10
  • § 2:2 : Drawing the Line Between Trademark Categories2-11
    • § 2:2.1 : Generic Versus Descriptive Marks2-11
    • § 2:2.2 : Descriptive Versus Suggestive Marks2-13
  • § 2:3 : Personal Names and Geographic Terms As Trademarks2-15
    • § 2:3.1 : Personal Names2-16
      • [A] : Types of Injunctive Relief2-16
      • [B] : Primarily Merely a Surname2-18
    • § 2:3.2 : Nicknames: The Public Use Doctrine2-18
    • § 2:3.3 : Geographic Terms2-19
      • [A] : Primarily Geographically Descriptive Terms2-19
      • [B] : Primarily Geographically Deceptively Misdescriptive Terms2-20
    • § 2:3.4 : The Fair Use Defense2-21
  • § 2:4 : Slogans As Trademarks2-22
  • § 2:5 : Letters and Numbers As Trademarks2-23
    • § 2:5.1 : Letter Trademarks2-23
    • § 2:5.2 : Number Trademarks2-24
  • § 2:6 : Foreign Language Terms As Trademarks2-26
  • § 2:7 : Designs As Trademarks2-27
    • § 2:7.1 : General Rules2-27
    • § 2:7.2 : Ornamentation Versus Trademark Significance2-27
    • § 2:7.3 : Separate Commercial Impression Versus Mere Background2-28
    • § 2:7.4 : Inherently Distinctive Versus Ordinary2-29
  • § 2:8 : Book Titles and Characters As Trademarks2-30
  • § 2:9 : Song Titles As Trademarks2-31
  • § 2:10 : Colors As Trademarks2-31
    • § 2:10.1 : Evolution of Color Protection2-31
    • § 2:10.2 : The Functionality Defense2-33
      • [A] : Types of Functionality2-33
      • [B] : Sample Decisions2-35
    • § 2:10.3 : A Single Color Cannot Be Inherently Distinctive2-37
    • § 2:10.4 : Summary2-38
  • § 2:11 : Package Appearance and Product Design (Trade Dress) As Trademarks2-39
    • § 2:11.1 : Definition of Trade Dress2-39
  • § 2:12 : Sounds As Trademarks2-39
  • § 2:13 : Flavors As Trademarks2-40
  • § 2:14 : Family of Marks2-40
Chapter 3: Protecting Trade Dress as a Trademark
  • § 3:1 : Definition of Trade Dress3-2
  • § 3:2 : Elements of Proof3-2
    • § 3:2.1 : Functionality3-3
      • [A] : Utilitarian Functionality3-4
      • [B] : Aesthetic Functionality3-9
      • [C] : Burden of Proof3-15
      • [D] : Incontestability3-16
      • [E] : Preemption, Patents, and Product Design3-16
    • § 3:2.2 : Inherent Distinctiveness3-20
      • [A] : Product Design Protection Prior to Wal-Mart3-20
      • [B] : Wal-Mart Enters the Fray3-21
      • [C] : The Wal-Mart Rationale3-21
      • [D] : Two Pesos Revisited3-21
      • [E] : Drawing the Line Between Product Packaging and Product Design3-22
      • [F] : Inherently Distinctive Packaging3-23
    • § 3:2.3 : Secondary Meaning3-24
    • § 3:2.4 : Likelihood of Confusion in the Trade Dress Context3-27
      • [A] : Test for Likely Confusion3-27
      • [B] : House Mark Defense3-28
  • § 3:3 : Conclusion3-32
Chapter 4: Searching a Trademark
  • § 4:1 : Purpose of Search4-1
  • § 4:2 : How and What to Search4-2
    • § 4:2.1 : Scope of Search4-2
    • § 4:2.2 : Timetable for Search4-3
    • § 4:2.3 : Goods to Cover in Search4-3
    • § 4:2.4 : Searching Shortcuts4-3
  • § 4:3 : Slogans and Descriptive Terms4-4
  • § 4:4 : Analyzing a Search4-4
    • § 4:4.1 : Availability4-4
      • [A] : Spotting Potential Conflicts4-5
      • [B] : Overcoming Conflicts4-5
    • § 4:4.2 : Protectability4-7
      • [A] : Evaluating the Risks4-7
Chapter 5: Using a Trademark
  • § 5:1 : Establishing Priority5-2
    • § 5:1.1 : Public Use Is Essential5-2
      • [A] : Uses Sufficiently Public to Establish Priority5-3
      • [B] : Uses Insufficiently Public to Establish Priority5-3
    • § 5:1.2 : The Effect of Intent to Use on Priority5-4
    • § 5:1.3 : The Effect of De Minimis Use on Priority5-7
    • § 5:1.4 : Continuous Commercial Use5-8
    • § 5:1.5 : Use Required by the Trademark Revision Act of 1988: Token Users Need Not Apply5-10
    • § 5:1.6 : Remember the Equities5-11
    • § 5:1.7 : Use in Anticipation of Commercial Development: Cat Food Is Cat Food5-12
    • § 5:1.8 : Secondary Meaning Required for Priority in Descriptive Marks5-13
    • § 5:1.9 : Use Required for Federal Registration Compared with Use Sufficient for Priority5-14
    • § 5:1.10 : Summary5-14
  • § 5:2 : Proper Trademark Use5-14
    • § 5:2.1 : The Basic Rules5-15
      • [A] : Trademark to Be Accompanied by Generic Term5-15
      • [B] : Setting the Trademark Apart5-15
      • [C] : TM and Registration Notices5-16
      • [D] : Claims of Exclusivity5-17
      • [E] : Trademarks and Grammar5-17
    • § 5:2.2 : The Consequence of Improper Use5-18
  • § 5:3 : Measuring the Purchaser’s Understanding5-19
    • § 5:3.1 : Discounting Purchaser Motivation: The Monopoly Case5-21
    • § 5:3.2 : When Purchaser Association Won’t Help: De Facto Secondary Meaning5-22
    • § 5:3.3 : Change in Public Perception May Revive a Once Generic Term5-23
Chapter 6: Registering a Trademark
  • § 6:1 : The Benefits of Federal Registration6-2
    • § 6:1.1 : The Principal Versus the Supplemental Register6-3
    • § 6:1.2 : Federal Versus State Registration6-5
  • § 6:2 : Basic Requirements for Federal Registration6-5
  • § 6:3 : Procedure for Federal Registration: Overview6-6
    • § 6:3.1 : The Trademark Law Treaty Implementation Act, Effective October 30, 19996-6
    • § 6:3.2 : Use-Based Application6-6
    • § 6:3.3 : Intent-to-Use Application6-7
      • [A] : Declaring Your Intentions6-8
      • [B] : Making Good on Your Intentions: The Statement of Use6-10
  • § 6:4 : The Trademark Application: Form and Content6-11
    • § 6:4.1 : Identification of the Applicant6-12
    • § 6:4.2 : Description of Goods or Services6-12
    • § 6:4.3 : Designation of Class6-13
    • § 6:4.4 : Dates of Use6-13
    • § 6:4.5 : Specimens6-14
    • § 6:4.6 : Drawing of the Mark: Less Is More6-16
    • § 6:4.7 : Amendments to the Drawing: Material Alterations Not Permitted6-18
    • § 6:4.8 : Verification and Execution by Applicant6-19
    • § 6:4.9 : Requirements for Filing Date6-20
    • § 6:4.10 : Foreign Applicants6-21
    • § 6:4.11 : Electronic Filings6-23
    • § 6:4.12 : Summary6-24
  • § 6:5 : Overcoming Rejections6-26
    • § 6:5.1 : Procedure6-26
      • [A] : Time for Responding6-27
      • [B] : Final Rejections6-27
    • § 6:5.2 : Grounds for Rejection6-28
    • § 6:5.3 : Responses to Rejections6-30
      • [A] : Telephone Interviews6-30
      • [B] : Overcoming Descriptiveness Rejections6-30
      • [C] : Overcoming Surname Rejections6-31
      • [D] : Claiming Distinctiveness Under Section 2(f)6-32
      • [E] : Transfer to Supplemental Register6-34
      • [F] : Disclaimers6-35
      • [G] : Overcoming Prior Registrations6-36
  • § 6:6 : Review of Examiner Decisions6-40
    • § 6:6.1 : Review by Appeal to Trademark Trial and Appeal Board6-40
      • [A] : Timing6-40
      • [B] : Reconsideration and Appeal from Board Decision6-41
    • § 6:6.2 : Review by Petition to the Commissioner6-41
    • § 6:6.3 : Error in the Examination Process: Restoring Jurisdiction to the Examiner6-42
  • § 6:7 : The Madrid Protocol6-43
    • § 6:7.1 : Overview6-43
    • § 6:7.2 : United States Accession to the Protocol6-44
    • § 6:7.3 : Basic Filing Procedures Under the Protocol6-44
    • § 6:7.4 : Considerations for U.S. Applicants6-45
    • § 6:7.5 : Considerations for Non-U.S. Applicants Filing in the United States6-47
Chapter 7: Maintaining a Registration
  • § 7:1 : Overview of Maintenance Requirements7-2
    • § 7:1.1 : Trademark Electronic Application System (TEAS)7-3
    • § 7:1.2 : Meeting the Deadline: The World According to TEAS7-3
    • § 7:1.3 : The Importance of Being the Owner7-4
  • § 7:2 : The Section 8 Affidavit of Use7-4
    • § 7:2.1 : Use in Commerce7-6
    • § 7:2.2 : Unlawful Use7-6
    • § 7:2.3 : Specimen Showing Current Use7-7
    • § 7:2.4 : Deadline for Filing Fifth-Year Section 8 Affidavit of Use7-8
    • § 7:2.5 : Fraud7-8
    • § 7:2.6 : Summary7-9
  • § 7:3 : The Section 15 Affidavit of Incontestability7-10
    • § 7:3.1 : Requirements7-10
    • § 7:3.2 : The Benefits of Incontestability7-11
    • § 7:3.3 : The Shield Becomes a Sword7-11
    • § 7:3.4 : How Sharp Is the Incontestable Sword?7-13
      • [A] : Equitable Defenses Are Available7-13
      • [B] : Incontestability and Trademark Strength7-13
      • [C] : Exceptions to Incontestability7-14
    • § 7:3.5 : Fraud7-15
    • § 7:3.6 : Summary7-16
  • § 7:4 : Registration Renewals7-17
    • § 7:4.1 : Deadline7-17
    • § 7:4.2 : Requirements7-17
    • § 7:4.3 : Fraud7-19
    • § 7:4.4 : Summary7-19
  • § 7:5 : Updating a Registration7-20
    • § 7:5.1 : Changes in the Mark7-20
    • § 7:5.2 : Changes in the Goods7-21
    • § 7:5.3 : Correcting Mistakes: Whose Mistake Was It Anyway?7-22
Chapter 8: Protecting a Trademark from Infringement
  • § 8:1 : Likelihood of Confusion8-3
    • § 8:1.1 : Confusion of Any Kind8-3
      • [A] : Initial Interest Confusion8-3
      • [B] : Post-Sale Confusion8-4
    • § 8:1.2 : Likelihood Means Probable, Not Possible8-6
    • § 8:1.3 : Factors to Consider in Determining Likely Confusion8-6
      • [A] : The Strength of Plaintiff’s Mark8-7
      • [B] : The Degree of Similarities in the Marks8-12
      • [C] : Proximity of the Goods8-17
      • [D] : Likelihood of Bridging the Gap8-20
      • [E] : Defendant’s Intent8-21
      • [F] : Evidence of Actual Confusion8-27
      • [G] : Purchaser Sophistication8-29
      • [H] : Quality of Defendant’s Goods8-32
    • § 8:1.4 : Balance of Harm8-33
  • § 8:2 : Reverse Confusion: Reversal of Fortune?8-34
  • § 8:3 : Counterfeit8-35
    • § 8:3.1 : The Trademark Counterfeiting Acts of 1984, 1994, 1996, and 2008: The Noose Draws Tighter8-36
      • [A] : Upping the Civil and Criminal Penalties8-36
      • [B] : Definitions8-37
      • [C] : The Average Purchaser Is Alive and Well8-37
      • [D] : Intentional and Knowing Use8-38
    • § 8:3.2 : Ex Parte Seizure8-39
      • [A] : Material Subject to Seizure8-40
      • [B] : Wrongful Seizure8-40
      • [C] : Appeal of Seizure Order8-41
    • § 8:3.3 : Customs and Border Protection Role8-41
    • § 8:3.4 : Interpreting the Counterfeit Provisions: Do Not Spare the Rod8-42
    • § 8:3.5 : What Is Not a Counterfeit?8-46
    • § 8:3.6 : What Is a Counterfeit?8-46
    • § 8:3.7 : Construing the Criminal Counterfeiting Act8-49
    • § 8:3.8 : Some Tips8-50
  • § 8:4 : Contributory Infringement8-51
    • § 8:4.1 : Tiffany v. eBay: Too Big to Fail?8-53
  • § 8:5 : Vicarious Liability8-57
Chapter 9: The Evolution of Dilution: Survival of the Strongest
  • § 9:1 : Overview9-3
    • § 9:1.1 : What Is Dilution?9-3
    • § 9:1.2 : Back to the Future9-4
  • § 9:2 : The State Dilution Statutes9-5
    • § 9:2.1 : Distinctiveness9-6
    • § 9:2.2 : Blurring and Tarnishment9-7
      • [A] : Blurring9-7
      • [B] : Tarnishment9-8
  • § 9:3 : The Movement Toward National Protection9-9
  • § 9:4 : The 1996 Federal Trademark Dilution Act (FTDA)9-10
    • § 9:4.1 : Dilution Defined9-10
    • § 9:4.2 : Elements of a Dilution Cause of Action Under the FTDA9-10
    • § 9:4.3 : Dilution by Blurring or Tarnishment9-11
  • § 9:5 : The Supreme Court Gets Into the Dilution Act9-12
    • § 9:5.1 : 2003: Victoria’s Secret: Actual Dilution Is Required Under the FTDA9-12
    • § 9:5.2 : 2006: The Supreme Court Bows Out: Likely Dilution Is the Standard Under the TDRA9-13
  • § 9:6 : The 2006 Trademark Dilution Revision Act (TDRA)9-13
    • § 9:6.1 : Key Provisions9-13
    • § 9:6.2 : Statutory Elements9-14
    • § 9:6.3 : Likely Dilution Standard9-14
    • § 9:6.4 : Famous Mark Requirement9-15
      • [A] : The Fame Factors9-15
      • [B] : Niche Marks No Longer Protected9-16
    • § 9:6.5 : Protection of Marks That Have Acquired Distinctiveness9-16
    • § 9:6.6 : Blurring As Defined by the TDRA: Impairment Is the Key9-17
    • § 9:6.7 : The Blurring Factors9-17
      • [A] : Degree of Similarity9-18
      • [B] : Degree of Inherent or Acquired Distinctiveness9-19
      • [C] : Extent of Substantially Exclusive Use9-21
      • [D] : Degree of Recognition9-21
      • [E] : Intent to Create Association with Famous Mark9-21
      • [F] : Actual Association with Famous Mark9-22
    • § 9:6.8 : Applying the Blurring Factors9-23
    • § 9:6.9 : Association Alone Does Not Prove Blurring or Tarnishment9-23
    • § 9:6.10 : Tarnishment Under the TDRA9-23
      • [A] : Tarnishment Defined9-23
      • [B] : Tarnishment and the Victoria’s Secret Case9-23
      • [C] : Victoria’s Secret and the Supreme Court Decision9-24
      • [D] : Victoria’s Secret on Remand—Who Has the Burden of Proof?9-24
      • [E] : Other Tarnishment Cases Under the TDRA9-26
      • [F] : Role of the First Amendment: Commercial Versus Noncommercial Use9-27
    • § 9:6.11 : Survey Evidence and Dilution9-28
      • [A] : Surveys Directed to Blurring9-28
      • [B] : Surveys Directed to Tarnishment9-30
      • [C] : Finding Tarnishment Without Benefit of Surveys9-31
    • § 9:6.12 : The Starbucks Versus Charbucks Saga9-31
      • [A] : In the Beginning9-32
      • [B] : The Course of Events9-32
      • [C] : The Word from the Second Circuit9-34
      • [D] : More on Starbucks9-34
    • § 9:6.13 : Protection of Trade Dress Under the TDRA9-35
    • § 9:6.14 : Application of Dilution to Action Between Competitors Under the TDRA9-36
    • § 9:6.15 : Defenses Under the TDRA9-36
      • [A] : Federal Registration9-36
      • [B] : Nominative or Descriptive Fair Use9-37
      • [C] : Parody and Noncommercial Use9-38
    • § 9:6.16 : Remedies Under the TDRA9-40
  • § 9:7 : Dilution in Patent and Trademark Office Proceedings9-41
  • § 9:8 : Contributory Dilution9-43
  • § 9:9 : Looking to the Future9-43
Chapter 10: Protecting Against False Advertising Claims
  • § 10:1 : The Statutory Framework10-2
    • § 10:1.1 : Section 43(a) of the Lanham Act10-2
    • § 10:1.2 : Limits on Section 43(a)10-3
      • [A] : The First Amendment Defense to False Endorsement and the “Inexplicably Intertwined” Doctrine10-3
      • [B] : The Supreme Court Dastar Decision10-5
    • § 10:1.3 : Standing Under Section 43(a): Lexmark v. Static Control10-6
  • § 10:2 : Literal Versus Implicit Falsity Under Section 43(a)10-8
  • § 10:3 : The Test for Claims Based on Tests10-9
  • § 10:4 : Elements of a False Advertising Action10-10
    • § 10:4.1 : False or Misleading Claims: The Truth Will Out10-10
      • [A] : Claims Found Not False or Misleading10-11
      • [B] : Claims Found False or Misleading10-12
      • [C] : Claims Made in Commercial Advertising or Promotion10-14
    • § 10:4.2 : Deception of a Significant Portion of the Intended Audience10-15
    • § 10:4.3 : Materiality10-16
    • § 10:4.4 : Use in Commerce10-17
    • § 10:4.5 : Likelihood of Injury10-17
  • § 10:5 : The Presumption of Irreparable Harm10-18
  • § 10:6 : Some Defenses10-18
    • § 10:6.1 : The Puffing Defense: Puff the Magic Dragon10-18
      • [A] : Puffing Found10-19
      • [B] : Puffing Not Found10-20
    • § 10:6.2 : FDA Approval Does Not Preclude Lanham Act False Advertising Claim: The Supreme Court Speaks in POM Wonderful v. Coca-Cola10-20
    • § 10:6.3 : Statute of Limitations10-22
  • § 10:7 : Monetary Relief: Is There Gold at the End of the False Advertising Rainbow?10-23
    • § 10:7.1 : Types of Monetary Relief10-23
    • § 10:7.2 : Defendant’s Profits: The Requirement of Willfulness10-23
    • § 10:7.3 : Plaintiff’s Damages10-25
      • [A] : Actual Damages10-25
      • [B] : Enhanced Damages10-29
    • § 10:7.4 : Court Costs10-29
    • § 10:7.5 : Attorneys’ Fees10-30
    • § 10:7.6 : Prejudgment Interest10-30
  • § 10:8 : Conclusion10-30
Chapter 11: Interacting with the Internet
  • § 11:1 : Internet Basics for Trademark Owners11-2
    • § 11:1.1 : Internet Addresses and Domain Names11-3
    • § 11:1.2 : The Internet As a Tool for Advertisers and Tricksters11-5
      • [A] : Metatags, Keywords, Sponsored Link Ads, Pop-Up Ads11-5
      • [B] : Linking and Phishing11-7
    • § 11:1.3 : Types of Websites That Raise Trademark Issues11-7
  • § 11:2 : What Is Trademark “Use in Commerce” on the Internet?11-9
    • § 11:2.1 : Rescuecom v. Google: Purchase and Sale of Key Words Is Actionable “Use in Commerce”11-9
      • [A] : Operation of the Google Search Engine11-10
      • [B] : Rescuecom’s Comments on Google’s Arguments11-10
  • § 11:3 : Likely Confusion on the Internet11-11
    • § 11:3.1 : The Likely Confusion Factors11-11
    • § 11:3.2 : Initial Interest Confusion11-11
    • § 11:3.3 : The Battles over Keyword Confusion11-14
  • § 11:4 : Applying Dilution Principles to Internet Disputes11-18
  • § 11:5 : Domain Name Issues11-19
    • § 11:5.1 : Acquiring Domain Names11-19
    • § 11:5.2 : Domain Names As Trademarks11-20
    • § 11:5.3 : Domain Names and Likely Confusion11-20
      • [A] : Intuitive Domain Names11-21
      • [B] : Postdomain Paths11-22
    • § 11:5.4 : Domain Names and Likely Dilution11-22
  • § 11:6 : Uniform Domain Name Dispute Resolution Policy (UDRP)11-23
    • § 11:6.1 : Nature of UDRP Proceedings11-23
    • § 11:6.2 : UDRP Procedures11-24
    • § 11:6.3 : Remedies Under the UDRP11-25
    • § 11:6.4 : Sample UDRP Decisions11-25
    • § 11:6.5 : Appeals to the Courts11-27
    • § 11:6.6 : New gTLDs, More Acronyms11-28
  • § 11:7 : Anticybersquatting Consumer Protection Act (ACPA)11-30
    • § 11:7.1 : Bad Faith Requirement11-31
    • § 11:7.2 : Confusion and Dilution Under the ACPA11-33
    • § 11:7.3 : Safe Harbor Defense11-34
    • § 11:7.4 : In Rem Actions11-34
    • § 11:7.5 : Remedies11-35
  • § 11:8 : Internet Infringement Defenses11-36
    • § 11:8.1 : Descriptive and Nominative Fair Use11-36
    • § 11:8.2 : Commentary, Criticism, Parody, and Noncommercial Fair Use11-38
  • § 11:9 : Policing Social Media Sites11-39
  • § 11:10 : Personal Jurisdiction11-40
  • § 11:11 : Scope of Relief: When Is the World Wide Web Too Wide?11-43
  • § 11:12 : Where Does Responsibility for Infringement Lie?11-44
  • § 11:13 : The Internet As a Source of Information and Evidence11-47
  • § 11:14 : Conclusion11-48
Chapter 12: Defenses to Infringement
  • § 12:1 : Disputing Confusion12-3
    • § 12:1.1 : Vive la Différence!12-3
    • § 12:1.2 : Third-Party Use—or—Everyone Else Is Using It12-4
    • § 12:1.3 : Parody12-7
      • [A] : Parody Distinguished from Fair Use12-7
      • [B] : Parody Policy Considerations12-7
      • [C] : Parody Cases Summarized12-8
      • [D] : Intent to Amuse Versus Intent to Confuse12-10
      • [E] : The First Amendment Trump Card12-11
    • § 12:1.4 : First Sale Doctrine12-14
  • § 12:2 : Affirmative Defenses12-15
    • § 12:2.1 : Laches and Acquiescence12-16
      • [A] : The Underlying Policy12-16
      • [B] : Elements of the Laches Defense12-17
      • [C] : Laches Distinguished from Acquiescence12-23
      • [D] : Monetary Versus Injunctive Relief12-25
      • [E] : Where Laches Is Not a Bar12-26
    • § 12:2.2 : Estoppel12-30
      • [A] : Equitable Estoppel12-30
      • [B] : Judicial Estoppel12-31
      • [C] : Binding Judicial Admissions12-32
      • [D] : Res Judicata: Claim Preclusion and Issue Preclusion12-32
        • [D][1] : Claim Preclusion12-33
        • [D][2] : Issue Preclusion: TTAB and Federal CourtDecisions12-35
      • [E] : The Supreme Court Speaks on Issue Preclusion in B&B Hardware v. Hargis12-35
      • [F] : Res Judicata and Post-Judgment Conduct12-38
      • [G] : The Danger of Continued Use After an Adverse Determination: The Hallowine Case12-38
      • [H] : Trademark Rights Are Not Static12-39
    • § 12:2.3 : Abandonment12-40
      • [A] : The Heavy Burden of Proof12-40
      • [B] : Types of Abandonment12-41
    • § 12:2.4 : Fair Use12-51
      • [A] : The Statutory Standard12-51
      • [B] : Sample Decisions12-54
      • [C] : Fair Use: Nothing Is Absolute12-56
      • [D] : Fair Use Distinguished from Comparative Advertising12-58
      • [E] : Nominative Use12-60
    • § 12:2.5 : Genericness12-63
    • § 12:2.6 : Fraud in the Procurement and Maintenance of Trademark Registrations12-65
      • [A] : Heavy Burden of Proof12-65
      • [B] : Pleading the Elements of Fraud12-65
      • [C] : Fraud in the TTAB After Bose12-68
      • [D] : Fraud in the Federal Courts After Bose12-69
      • [E] : Pre-Bose Conduct Found to Constitute Fraud12-70
      • [F] : Pre-Bose Conduct Found Not to Constitute Fraud12-71
      • [G] : What Bose Did Not Answer—The Issue of Willful Blindness12-71
      • [H] : Cases Dealing with Willful Blindness12-71
      • [I] : The Consequences of Fraud12-74
    • § 12:2.7 : Unclean Hands12-75
    • § 12:2.8 : Trademark Misuse12-77
    • § 12:2.9 : Violation of Antitrust Laws12-77
      • [A] : Direct Relation Between Antitrust Violation and Trademark Required12-78
      • [B] : Patents and Trademark Distinguished12-78
      • [C] : Bad-Faith Trademark Enforcement: The Noerr-Pennington Doctrine and the “Sham” Exception12-79
      • [D] : The Elements of Monopolization and Attempted Monopolization12-80
      • [E] : The Relevant Market12-81
      • [F] : Conspiracy in Restraint of Trade12-81
Chapter 13: Negotiating a Settlement
  • § 13:1 : “I’d Rather Switch Than Fight”13-1
    • § 13:1.1 : Making Sure Who’s First13-2
    • § 13:1.2 : Getting the Facts13-2
  • § 13:2 : Creating the Right Atmosphere13-3
    • § 13:2.1 : The Honey-Versus-Vinegar Principle13-3
    • § 13:2.2 : Telephone Versus Correspondence13-4
  • § 13:3 : Common Settlement Arrangements13-4
    • § 13:3.1 : Gradual Name Change13-4
    • § 13:3.2 : Limitations on Use13-5
    • § 13:3.3 : Monetary Settlements13-5
    • § 13:3.4 : License Agreements13-6
  • § 13:4 : Getting the Client into the Act13-6
  • § 13:5 : Leading from Strength13-6
    • § 13:5.1 : Settlement During Litigation13-7
    • § 13:5.2 : Getting the Court into the Act13-7
    • § 13:5.3 : The Insurance Factor13-7
  • § 13:6 : Other Alternatives to Litigation: ADR13-9
  • § 13:7 : Negotiators Beware13-10
  • § 13:8 : Retaining Jurisdiction to Enforce the Settlement Agreement13-11
Chapter 14: Litigating in Court
  • § 14:1 : Pleading Your Case Under the Supreme Court’s Heightened Standard of Pleading14-3
    • § 14:1.1 : Infringement of Federally Registered Mark14-5
    • § 14:1.2 : Violation of Section 43(a)14-6
      • [A] : Protection of Unregistered Marks14-6
      • [B] : False Advertising14-7
    • § 14:1.3 : Common-Law Trademark Infringement and Unfair Competition14-8
    • § 14:1.4 : Deceptive Trade Practices14-9
    • § 14:1.5 : Dilution14-10
    • § 14:1.6 : Misappropriation14-11
  • § 14:2 : Additional Causes of Action14-12
    • § 14:2.1 : Rights of Publicity and Privacy14-13
    • § 14:2.2 : Interference with Business Relations14-14
    • § 14:2.3 : Interference with Prospective Economic Advantage14-14
    • § 14:2.4 : Breach of Contract14-15
    • § 14:2.5 : Malicious Interference with Contract14-16
    • § 14:2.6 : Disparagement14-17
    • § 14:2.7 : Defamation14-17
  • § 14:3 : Overlapping Claims14-18
  • § 14:4 : Preemption14-18
  • § 14:5 : Scope of Injunctive Relief14-19
  • § 14:6 : Opening the Courthouse Door: Personal and Subject Matter Jurisdiction14-19
    • § 14:6.1 : Subject Matter Jurisdiction14-19
      • [A] : Declaratory Judgment Jurisdiction14-20
      • [B] : Extraterritorial Jurisdiction Under the Lanham Act14-21
    • § 14:6.2 : Personal Jurisdiction14-23
  • § 14:7 : Choosing the Forum: Plaintiff’s Choice and Defendant’s Convenience14-24
  • § 14:8 : Time Limit for Serving Complaint14-26
  • § 14:9 : Researching Your Judge14-26
    • § 14:9.1 : Checking the Local Law Journal14-27
    • § 14:9.2 : Checking for Biographical Data14-27
    • § 14:9.3 : Checking with Local Counsel14-27
    • § 14:9.4 : Checking the Judge’s Decisions14-27
  • § 14:10 : To Jury or Not to Jury14-27
    • § 14:10.1 : Should a Jury Be Requested?14-27
      • [A] : Strong Versus Weak Case14-28
      • [B] : Big Guy Versus Little Guy14-28
      • [C] : The Home Field Advantage14-28
      • [D] : The Registration Advantage14-28
      • [E] : Time, Money, and Appealability14-28
    • § 14:10.2 : Demanding a Jury Trial14-29
    • § 14:10.3 : Avoiding a Jury Trial14-30
  • § 14:11 : Time Limit for Answering the Complaint14-32
  • § 14:12 : Drafting the Answer14-32
    • § 14:12.1 : Affirmative Defenses14-32
    • § 14:12.2 : Counterclaims14-33
  • § 14:13 : Serving Papers: The World According to FRCP14-33
  • § 14:14 : Early Pretrial Motions14-35
    • § 14:14.1 : Make Them or Waive Them: Lack of Personal Jurisdiction, Insufficient Service, and Improper Venue14-35
    • § 14:14.2 : Temporary Restraining Order (TRO)14-35
    • § 14:14.3 : Preliminary Injunction14-36
    • § 14:14.4 : Expedited Discovery14-36
    • § 14:14.5 : Motion to Dismiss14-37
    • § 14:14.6 : Motion to Strike14-39
    • § 14:14.7 : Motion to Transfer14-39
  • § 14:15 : Other Pretrial Motions14-39
    • § 14:15.1 : Motion to Bifurcate14-39
    • § 14:15.2 : Motion to Produce Attorney’s Opinions14-40
    • § 14:15.3 : Motion to Amend the Pleadings14-40
    • § 14:15.4 : Summary Judgment14-41
    • § 14:15.5 : Motions in Limine14-42
  • § 14:16 : Beware the Sanctions of Rule 1114-43
    • § 14:16.1 : Rule 11 and the USPTO14-44
    • § 14:16.2 : The Rule 11 Motion14-44
  • § 14:17 : The Discovery Process14-46
    • § 14:17.1 : Initial Disclosure14-49
    • § 14:17.2 : Interrogatories14-50
    • § 14:17.3 : Depositions14-50
      • [A] : Preparing the Deponent14-51
      • [B] : “Speaking” Objections: Not Allowed14-54
    • § 14:17.4 : Document Requests—Before or After Depositions14-54
    • § 14:17.5 : Requests for Admission14-56
    • § 14:17.6 : Use of Subpoenas Under Rule 4514-57
    • § 14:17.7 : Duty to Supplement Discovery and Preserve Evidence14-58
    • § 14:17.8 : Asserting and Maintaining Privileges14-63
      • [A] : Attorney-Client Privilege14-63
      • [B] : Work-Product Privilege14-67
      • [C] : Confidentiality14-69
Chapter 15: Terminating the Litigation Before Trial
  • § 15:1 : Introduction15-2
  • § 15:2 : Preliminary Injunctive Relief15-2
    • § 15:2.1 : Preliminary Injunction Standards15-2
      • [A] : Irreparable Harm to Plaintiff15-3
      • [B] : Likely Success on the Merits15-10
      • [C] : Balancing the Harms15-11
      • [D] : Plaintiff’s Speed in Seeking Preliminary Relief15-12
    • § 15:2.2 : Preliminary Injunction Procedure15-12
    • § 15:2.3 : Combining Preliminary Injunction with Trial on the Merits15-13
    • § 15:2.4 : Appeal of Preliminary Injunction15-13
  • § 15:3 : Summary Judgment15-14
    • § 15:3.1 : Purpose of Summary Judgment15-14
    • § 15:3.2 : The Modern Trend15-15
    • § 15:3.3 : The Supreme Court Boost to Summary Judgment15-16
    • § 15:3.4 : The Bottom Line15-17
    • § 15:3.5 : Cases Where Summary Judgment Granted and Denied15-17
      • [A] : Completeness of Record15-17
      • [B] : Laches15-18
      • [C] : Fair Use15-18
      • [D] : Trademark Validity15-19
      • [E] : Trademark Infringement15-21
      • [F] : Res Judicata and Collateral Estoppel15-23
      • [G] : Dilution15-25
      • [H] : Appealability15-25
    • § 15:3.6 : 2010 Amended Summary Judgment Rules15-27
  • § 15:4 : Offer of Judgment15-28
Chapter 16: Proving the Fundamentals at Trial
  • § 16:1 : Choosing Your Witnesses and Exhibits16-2
  • § 16:2 : Overall Presentation16-3
  • § 16:3 : Proving Trademark Ownership16-3
  • § 16:4 : Proving Trademark Validity16-5
    • § 16:4.1 : Presumption of Validity16-5
    • § 16:4.2 : Proving Secondary Meaning16-6
  • § 16:5 : Proving Likelihood of Confusion16-7
    • § 16:5.1 : Factor: The Strength of the Mark16-7
    • § 16:5.2 : Factor: Similarities Between the Marks16-8
    • § 16:5.3 : Factor: Proximity and Marketing of the Products16-8
    • § 16:5.4 : Factor: Likelihood of Bridging the Gap16-9
    • § 16:5.5 : Factor: Defendant’s Bad-Faith Adoption16-9
    • § 16:5.6 : Factor: Quality of Defendant’s Products16-10
    • § 16:5.7 : Factor: Consumer Sophistication and Care16-10
    • § 16:5.8 : Factor: Actual Confusion16-10
    • § 16:5.9 : Actual Confusion Evidence and the Hearsay Rule16-10
      • [A] : Evidence Excluded or Given Little Weight16-11
      • [B] : Evidence Admitted16-12
  • § 16:6 : Survey Evidence16-13
    • § 16:6.1 : Survey Standards16-14
      • [A] : Hiring an Expert16-15
      • [B] : The Relevant Universe16-16
      • [C] : Sampling the Universe16-17
      • [D] : The Use of a Control16-18
      • [E] : The Questionnaire16-19
      • [F] : The Consumer Environment16-21
      • [G] : Professional, Unbiased Interviewers16-22
      • [H] : Accurate Tabulation, Analysis, and Verification16-22
    • § 16:6.2 : Assessing the Survey Results16-23
      • [A] : Secondary Meaning16-23
      • [B] : Likelihood of Confusion16-23
      • [C] : Surveys Directed to Dilution16-24
      • [D] : Surveys Directed to Tarnishment16-25
  • § 16:7 : The Use of Expert Testimony16-26
    • § 16:7.1 : Admissibility Under the Federal Rules16-26
    • § 16:7.2 : The Daubert Criteria16-28
    • § 16:7.3 : The Hiring and Care of Expert Witnesses16-31
  • § 16:8 : Expert Discovery16-32
    • § 16:8.1 : Identification of Experts16-32
    • § 16:8.2 : The Expert’s Report16-33
    • § 16:8.3 : Expert Depositions16-34
    • § 16:8.4 : Supplementing Expert Reports16-34
    • § 16:8.5 : The December 2010 Amended Rules16-35
Chapter 17: Enforcing Trademark Rights: Available Remedies
  • § 17:1 : Introduction17-3
  • § 17:2 : Injunctive Relief17-3
    • § 17:2.1 : Injunctions Prohibiting Infringing Use17-4
    • § 17:2.2 : Product Recall17-7
    • § 17:2.3 : Disclaimers of Association17-7
    • § 17:2.4 : Corrective Advertising17-9
    • § 17:2.5 : Contempt17-10
  • § 17:3 : Monetary Relief17-13
    • § 17:3.1 : Defendant’s Profits17-14
    • § 17:3.2 : Actual Damages17-16
      • [A] : Proving the Fact of Damage17-18
      • [B] : Measuring Damage17-19
    • § 17:3.3 : Trebling Damages17-21
    • § 17:3.4 : Statutory Damages in Counterfeit Actions17-21
      • [A] : The Range of Counterfeit Statutory Damages17-21
      • [B] : The Relation of Counterfeit Statutory Damages to Mandatory Fee Award in Counterfeit Actions17-23
      • [C] : Assessing the Amount of Statutory Damages17-23
    • § 17:3.5 : Punitive Damages17-26
    • § 17:3.6 : Attorneys’ Fees: “Exceptional Cases” and Mandatory Award in Counterfeit Cases17-28
      • [A] : Fee Award to Prevailing Party in “Exceptional Cases”17-28
      • [B] : The Supreme Court Octane Decision—Has It Changed the Standard for Attorneys’ Fee Awards Under the Lanham Act?17-29
      • [C] : The Third Circuit Fair Wind Case Brings Octane to the Lanham Act17-30
      • [D] : Mandatory Fee Award in Counterfeit Cases17-34
    • § 17:3.7 : Costs17-36
  • § 17:4 : Cancellation of Trademark Registration17-37
    • § 17:4.1 : The Statutory Basis17-37
    • § 17:4.2 : The Grounds for Cancellation17-38
    • § 17:4.3 : The Prerequisite for Court Jurisdiction17-39
    • § 17:4.4 : Court Versus Patent and Trademark Office17-39
  • § 17:5 : Barring Importation from Abroad17-40
    • § 17:5.1 : Recording a Trademark Registration with Customs17-40
      • [A] : The Effect of Recordal17-40
      • [B] : Recordation Procedure17-41
      • [C] : Enlisting the Aid of Customs: Action Beyond Recordation17-42
      • [D] : Obtaining Information from Customs17-43
      • [E] : Challenging Customs Decisions17-44
    • § 17:5.2 : Parallel Imports and Gray-Market Goods17-44
      • [A] : Overview17-44
      • [B] : Customs and Border Protection Exclusion Under Section 52617-46
      • [C] : K Mart and the Common-Control Exception17-48
      • [D] : The Lever Case and the 1999 Customs Regulations17-50
      • [E] : Requesting Lever Rule Protection17-52
      • [F] : Close Business Relationship Does Not Equal Common Control17-53
      • [G] : Material Differences: Some General Principles17-53
      • [H] : Examples of Material Differences17-56
    • § 17:5.3 : Proceedings Before the ITC17-58
      • [A] : Scope17-58
      • [B] : Procedure17-59
      • [C] : Pleadings17-60
      • [D] : Stay of District Court Action17-60
      • [E] : Exclusion Orders17-62
      • [F] : Res Judicata Effect of ITC Ruling on District Court17-64
      • [G] : Changes to ITC Rules of Practice17-65
  • § 17:6 : Criminal Penalties17-65
  • § 17:7 : Declaratory Judgment of Noninfringement17-66
    • § 17:7.1 : The “Actual Controversy” Requirement17-66
    • § 17:7.2 : Already v. Nike: Nike Just Did It!17-67
Chapter 18: Appealing the District Court Decision
  • § 18:1 : What to Do When You Lose18-1
    • § 18:1.1 : Can You Negotiate a Settlement More Favorable Than the Decision?18-2
    • § 18:1.2 : Can You Seek Reargument or Reconsideration?18-2
    • § 18:1.3 : Can You Appeal?18-3
      • [A] : Final Orders18-3
      • [B] : Nonfinal Orders18-3
  • § 18:2 : Issues to Consider Before You Appeal18-4
    • § 18:2.1 : Standards on Appeal18-5
    • § 18:2.2 : Is an Appeal Enough?18-6
      • [A] : Stay of District Court Injunction Pending Appeal18-7
      • [B] : Expedited Appeals18-8
    • § 18:2.3 : What to Do When Your Opponent Appeals18-8
  • § 18:3 : Appeals to the Federal Circuit18-8
  • § 18:4 : Timeliness of Raising Arguments18-9
  • § 18:5 : The TTAB Versus the Alabama Federal District Court18-9
Chapter 19: Patent and Trademark Office Inter Partes Proceedings
  • § 19:1 : What Are Inter Partes Proceedings?19-3
  • § 19:2 : Opposition Proceedings19-4
    • § 19:2.1 : Publication in Official Gazette19-4
    • § 19:2.2 : Basis for Opposition19-5
      • [A] : The “Damage” Requirement for Standing19-5
      • [B] : Substantive Grounds for Opposition19-6
      • [C] : Improper Grounds19-13
    • § 19:2.3 : Defenses to Opposition19-13
      • [A] : The Requirement Regarding Counterclaims19-14
      • [B] : Laches, Acquiescence, and Estoppel19-15
      • [C] : Applicant’s Prior Registration of Similar Mark for Similar Goods19-16
  • § 19:3 : Procedure in Inter Partes Patent and Trademark Office Proceedings19-17
    • § 19:3.1 : Evidentiary Presumptions and Rules19-17
    • § 19:3.2 : The Pleadings19-21
    • § 19:3.3 : The Discovery Phase19-23
    • § 19:3.4 : Motion Practice19-32
    • § 19:3.5 : Suspension of Proceedings19-33
    • § 19:3.6 : Summary Judgment19-34
    • § 19:3.7 : Pretrial Disclosures and Trial Testimony19-35
    • § 19:3.8 : Briefs and Oral Hearings19-38
    • § 19:3.9 : Reconsideration and Appeal19-39
    • § 19:3.10 : Stipulating to Other Procedures; Accelerated Case Resolution (ACR)19-39
  • § 19:4 : Cancellation Proceedings19-40
    • § 19:4.1 : Procedure19-40
    • § 19:4.2 : Burden of Proof19-41
    • § 19:4.3 : The All-or-Nothing Rule No Longer Applies19-41
    • § 19:4.4 : The “Damage” Requirement for Standing19-42
    • § 19:4.5 : Grounds for Cancellation19-43
      • [A] : Before Five-Year Limit19-43
      • [B] : After Five-Year Limit19-44
      • [C] : Disparagement19-45
        • [C][1] : The Redskins Saga: Twenty-Plus Years Before the TTAB and the Federal Courts19-45
        • [C][2] : The Slants Come Marching In19-49
        • [C][3] : Stop the Islamisation of America19-53
        • [C][4] : Fuct Is Not Scandalous or Immoral—for Now19-53
      • [D] : Falsely Suggesting a Connection; Misrepresentation of Source19-54
      • [E] : Defenses19-57
    • § 19:4.6 : Cancellation of a Supplemental Registration19-57
      • [A] : Procedure and Standing19-57
      • [B] : Grounds for Cancellation19-58
  • § 19:5 : Concurrent-Use Proceedings19-59
    • § 19:5.1 : Conditions for Concurrent-Use Registration19-59
    • § 19:5.2 : Initiation of Proceedings19-59
    • § 19:5.3 : General Rules19-61
      • [A] : Nationwide Registration Accorded to the First User19-61
      • [B] : Agreements Between the Parties Normally Accepted As Reasonable Trade Area Division19-62
      • [C] : Allowing Second User’s Good-Faith Expansion Vis-à-Vis Static First User19-62
      • [D] : Remember the Equities19-62
  • § 19:6 : Interference Proceedings19-63
    • § 19:6.1 : The Issue of Priority19-63
    • § 19:6.2 : The Requirement of Extraordinary Circumstances19-63
    • § 19:6.3 : Procedure19-63
  • § 19:7 : Review of Trademark Trial and Appeal Board Decisions19-64
    • § 19:7.1 : Two Routes of Review19-64
    • § 19:7.2 : Trial De Novo in the District Court Versus Appeal19-64
    • § 19:7.3 : Effect of the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board Decision19-65
      • [A] : Legal Standards of Review19-65
      • [B] : The Availability of New Evidence19-67
      • [C] : Location for District Court Trial19-67
      • [D] : Remember the Equities19-68
      • [E] : To Appeal or Not to Appeal19-68
Chapter 20: Licensing a Trademark
  • § 20:1 : Introduction20-1
  • § 20:2 : The Requirement of Quality Control20-2
  • § 20:3 : The Consequences of Failure to Control Quality20-2
  • § 20:4 : The Heavy Burden of Proof20-3
  • § 20:5 : Methods of Quality Control20-4
    • § 20:5.1 : Written Contract20-5
    • § 20:5.2 : Oral Contract20-7
    • § 20:5.3 : Control in Absence of Contract20-7
    • § 20:5.4 : Control by Reasonable Reliance on Licensee20-8
    • § 20:5.5 : Appointment of Quality Control Agent20-9
    • § 20:5.6 : Too Much of a Good Thing20-9
  • § 20:6 : Patent and Trademark Office Procedure Regarding Licensing20-10
    • § 20:6.1 : Use by Related Company20-10
    • § 20:6.2 : Disclosure of Related Company Use in Application20-11
    • § 20:6.3 : Related Registrants: The Wella Soap Opera20-11
  • § 20:7 : Licensee Estoppel20-12
  • § 20:8 : Licensing and Product Liability20-14
  • § 20:9 : Licensing and Antitrust Liability20-14
  • § 20:10 : Bankrupt Trademark Owner’s Ability to Terminate Trademark License20-15
Chapter 21: Assigning a Trademark
  • § 21:1 : Introduction21-1
  • § 21:2 : Methods of Assignment21-2
  • § 21:3 : Requirement for Valid Assignment21-2
    • § 21:3.1 : The Transfer of Goodwill21-2
    • § 21:3.2 : The Indicia of Goodwill21-3
      • [A] : The Transfer of Tangible Assets21-3
      • [B] : The Similarity Between the Assignor’s and Assignee’s Goods21-4
      • [C] : Assignor’s Retention of Business21-5
  • § 21:4 : Consequences of Invalid Assignment21-6
  • § 21:5 : Assignments of Intent-to-Use Applications21-9
  • § 21:6 : Assignment Provisions21-9
  • § 21:7 : Recording Assignment with Patent and Trademark Office21-10
  • § 21:8 : Special Situations21-11
    • § 21:8.1 : Assignment of Trademark As Security Interest21-11
    • § 21:8.2 : Assignments in Bankruptcy21-12
Chapter 22: Expanding Trademark Rights
  • § 22:1 : Introduction22-2
  • § 22:2 : Territorial Expansion22-2
    • § 22:2.1 : Remote-Area Good-Faith Adoption22-2
      • [A] : Common Law Rule22-2
      • [B] : Beating the Remote-Area Defense22-3
      • [C] : If You Can’t Beat It, Limit It22-5
    • § 22:2.2 : Remote-Area Second User’s Adoption After Issuance of Federal Registration22-5
      • [A] : Constructive Notice Provision of the Lanham Act22-5
      • [B] : The Dawn Donut Rule22-5
      • [C] : The Hole in the Donut22-6
    • § 22:2.3 : Remote-Area Second User’s Adoption Before First User Obtains Federal Registration22-6
      • [A] : Defense to Incontestable Registration22-6
      • [B] : Defense to Contestable Registration22-9
    • § 22:2.4 : Remote-Area Second User First to Obtain Registration22-9
  • § 22:3 : Product Expansion22-10
  • § 22:4 : Expanding Trademark Rights from Outside the United States: The “Well-Known” or “Famous” Mark Exception to the Territoriality Principle22-12
    • § 22:4.1 : Is There a Well-Known-Mark Exception to the Territoriality Principle Under Federal Law?22-12
      • [A] : Split Between Ninth and Second Circuits: West Is West and East Is East22-13
    • § 22:4.2 : Protection Under State Unfair Competition Law: Fair or Unfair?22-15
  Appendices
Appendix 1: Trademark Fees
Appendix 2: Trademark/Servicemark Application Based on Use
Appendix 3: Trademark/Servicemark Application Based on Intent to Use
Appendix 4: Trademark/Servicemark Application Based on Foreign Registration
Appendix 5: Trademark/Servicemark Application Based on Foreign Application
Appendix 6: Amendment to Allege Use/Statement of Use
Appendix 7: First Request for Extension to File Statement of Use
Appendix 8: Declaration of Use
Appendix 9: Declaration of Use and Incontestability
Appendix 10: Extension to File Notice of Opposition
Appendix 11: Extension to File Notice of Opposition with Consent
Appendix 12: Combined Declaration of Use in Commerce/Application for Renewal of Registration of Mark Under Sections 8 and 9
Appendix 13: Trademark Assignment
Appendix 14: Designation of Domestic Representative
Appendix 15: Certificates for Communication with the PTO
Appendix 16: TTAB Standard Protective Order
Appendix 17: States with Dilution Statutes
Appendix 18: Illustrations
Appendix 19: Design Marks Found Confusingly Similar/Design Marks Found Not Confusingly Similar
Appendix 20: Factors Under the ACPA for Determining Bad-Faith Intent to Profit
  Table of Authorities
  Index

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"This is an outstanding reference that is clear, concise, and easy to use."
David Gould, Corporate Trademark Counsel, E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Company

"A reference tool that all trademark attorneys & should have close at hand."

Jeffrey M. Samuels, Law Office of Jeffrey M. Samuels, P.C., and former Assistant Commissioner for Trademarks, PTO


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