TreatiseTreatise

American Arbitration: Principles and Practice

 by Robert B von Mehren, George W Coombe, Steven J Burton
 
 Copyright: 2008-2009
 Last Updated: September 2009

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Product Details

  • ISBN Number: 9781402411236
  • Page Count: 600
  • Number of Volumes: 1
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In PLI’s American Arbitration, some of the country’s leading arbitrators provide the legal, institutional, documentary, and procedural guidance that can help you engage more effectively in this vital dispute resolution process.

American Arbitration enables you to understand the key laws and rules enforcing arbitration agreements and awards; pick appropriate arbitration providers, venues, and tribunal members; craft solid domestic and international arbitration agreements; secure preliminary injunctions and other remedies pending arbitrations; conduct arbitrations according to law, custom, and proven best practices; handle thorny arbitration issues such as multiple parties and multiple proceedings; and successfully challenge arbitral awards on substantive grounds.

Enhanced by planning checklists and sample agreement language that help to ensure the effective commencement, conduct, and conclusion of arbitrations, American Arbitration covers the laws, rules, techniques, procedures, issues, and trends specific to arbitrations in such areas as securities, intellectual property, international commerce, construction, and labor and employment.

Updated at least once a year, American Arbitration: Principles and Practice is an essential resource for professional arbitrators and an important reference for attorneys, company executives, and other professionals involved in alternative dispute resolution processes.

  Foreword Robert B. von Mehren ~ Debevoise & Plimpton LLP
George W. Coombe ~
Steven J. Burton ~ University of Iowa College of Law
  Introduction Robert B. von Mehren ~ Debevoise & Plimpton LLP
George W. Coombe ~
Steven J. Burton ~ University of Iowa College of Law
  Table of Contents Robert B. von Mehren ~ Debevoise & Plimpton LLP
George W. Coombe ~
Steven J. Burton ~ University of Iowa College of Law
Chapter 1: When to Arbitrate; When to Litigate Robert B. von Mehren ~ Debevoise & Plimpton LLP
George W. Coombe ~
Steven J. Burton ~ University of Iowa College of Law
  • § 1:1 : Introduction1-1
  • § 1:2 : Definition of Arbitration1-2
  • § 1:3 : Arbitration’s Traditional Advantages1-2
  • § 1:4 : Arbitration’s Traditional Disadvantages1-3
  • § 1:5 : Matters Better Arbitrated Than Litigated1-3
  • § 1:6 : Matters Better Litigated Than Arbitrated1-4
  • § 1:7 : The Business Point of View1-4
  • § 1:8 : Conclusion1-5
Chapter 2: Historical Background of Arbitration in the United States Robert B. von Mehren ~ Debevoise & Plimpton LLP
George W. Coombe ~
Steven J. Burton ~ University of Iowa College of Law
  • § 2:1 : Introduction2-1
  • § 2:2 : Early Judicial Attitudes2-3
  • § 2:3 : Legislative Reform2-4
  • § 2:4 : Federal Legislation2-5
Chapter 3: The Institutional Environment Robert B. von Mehren ~ Debevoise & Plimpton LLP
George W. Coombe ~
Steven J. Burton ~ University of Iowa College of Law
  • § 3:1 : Introduction3-2
  • § 3:2 : Types of Arbitration3-2
  • § 3:3 : International Chamber of Commerce3-3
    • § 3:3.1 : International Court of Arbitration3-4
    • § 3:3.2 : Secretariat3-4
    • § 3:3.3 : Rules3-5
      • [A] : Terms of Reference; Procedural Timetable— Article 183-5
        • [B] : Making the Award—Article 25(2); Scrutiny of the Award by the Court—Article 273-6
  • § 3:4 : American Arbitration Association3-7
    • § 3:4.1 : Rules3-8
      • [A] : Commercial Rules3-8
      • [A][1] : Expedited Procedures3-9
      • [A][2] : Pilot Flexible Fee Schedule3-9
      • [A][3] : Procedures for Large, Complex Commercial Disputes3-10
      • [A][4] : Emergency Measures of Protection3-10
      • [A][5] : Standard Commercial Rules3-10
      • [B] : International Rules3-11
  • § 3:5 : CPR Institute for Dispute Resolution3-12
    • § 3:5.1 : Rules3-13
      • [A] : Domestic Rules3-13
      • [A][1] : Rule 14: Interim Measures of Protection by a Special Arbitrator3-15
      • [B] : International Rules3-15
  • § 3:6 : Conclusion3-16
Chapter 4: Drafting the Arbitration Agreement Robert B. von Mehren ~ Debevoise & Plimpton LLP
George W. Coombe ~
Steven J. Burton ~ University of Iowa College of Law
  • § 4:1 : Introduction4-2
  • § 4:2 : Initial Questions4-2
  • § 4:3 : Checklists4-3
    • § 4:3.1 : Checklist for Domestic Arbitrations4-3
    • § 4:3.2 : Checklist for International Arbitrations4-3
  • § 4:4 : Domestic Arbitrations4-4
    • § 4:4.1 : Scope of the Arbitration Clause4-4
    • § 4:4.2 : Entry of Judgment Provision4-5
    • § 4:4.3 : What Institution or Set of Rules Should Be Selected?4-5
    • § 4:4.4 : What Venue Should Be Selected?4-7
    • § 4:4.5 : What Substantive Law Should Be Chosen?4-7
    • § 4:4.6 : Should the Tribunal Consist of One or Three Arbitrators?4-8
    • § 4:4.7 : How Should the Tribunal Be Chosen?4-9
    • § 4:4.8 : Are Interim Measures Likely to Be Required?4-10
  • § 4:5 : International Arbitrations4-10
    • § 4:5.1 : Language4-10
    • § 4:5.2 : What Should Be the International Venue?4-11
  • § 4:6 : Conclusion4-14
Chapter 5: Conducting the Arbitration Robert B. von Mehren ~ Debevoise & Plimpton LLP
George W. Coombe ~
Steven J. Burton ~ University of Iowa College of Law
  • § 5:1 : Introduction5-1
  • § 5:2 : Commencing the Arbitration5-1
  • § 5:3 : Appointing the Arbitrator5-3
  • § 5:4 : Pre-Hearing Conference5-5
  • § 5:5 : Pre-Hearing Disclosure5-6
  • § 5:6 : Briefing5-6
  • § 5:7 : Demeanor at the Hearing5-7
  • § 5:8 : Fact Witnesses5-7
  • § 5:9 : Expert Witnesses5-8
  • § 5:10 : Conclusion5-8
Chapter 6: Enforcing the Award Robert B. von Mehren ~ Debevoise & Plimpton LLP
George W. Coombe ~
Steven J. Burton ~ University of Iowa College of Law
  • § 6:1 : Introduction6-1
  • § 6:2 : Federal Arbitration Act6-2
    • § 6:2.1 : Confirmation Procedures6-3
    • § 6:2.2 : Grounds for Refusal to Enforce6-3
    • § 6:2.3 : Can the Parties by Their Agreement Change the Act’s Statutory Standardsfor Review?6-5
  • § 6:3 : New York Convention of 19586-6
    • § 6:3.1 : Enforcement Procedures6-7
    • § 6:3.2 : Grounds for Refusal to Enforce6-8
      • [A] : Absence of a Valid Arbitration Agreement— Article V(1)(a)6-8
      • [B] : Lack of Fair Opportunity to Be Heard— Article V(1)(b)6-8
      • [C] : Award Was Not Within Scope of Arbitration Clause—Article V(1)(c)6-10
      • [D] : Improper Composition of Tribunal— Article V(1)(d)6-11
      • [E] : Award Not Binding—Article V(1)(e)6-12
      • [F] : Additional Challenges—Article V(2)6-12
  • § 6:4 : Conclusion6-13
Chapter 7: The Legal Environment Robert B. von Mehren ~ Debevoise & Plimpton LLP
George W. Coombe ~
Steven J. Burton ~ University of Iowa College of Law
  • § 7:1 : Introduction7-2
  • § 7:2 : Federal Policy Favoring Arbitration7-3
    • § 7:2.1 : Federal Arbitration Act7-3
    • § 7:2.2 : International Conventions7-5
      • [A] : New York Convention7-5
      • [B] : Panama Convention7-6
    • § 7:2.3 : State Arbitration Laws7-7
    • § 7:2.4 : Federal Supremacy7-8
      • [A] : Federal Preemption7-8
      • [B] : When State Law Applies7-9
  • § 7:3 : Enforcing the Agreement to Arbitrate7-9
    • § 7:3.1 : Federal Court Jurisdiction and Venue7-10
      • [A] : Jurisdiction7-10
      • [B] : Venue7-11
    • § 7:3.2 : Staying Litigation and Compelling Arbitration7-12
      • [A] : Staying Litigation7-12
      • [B] : Compelling Arbitration7-13
    • § 7:3.3 : Who Decides Arbitrability?7-14
      • [A] : When Judges Decide7-14
      • [B] : When Arbitrators Decide7-14
    • § 7:3.4 : Resisting Enforcement: Public Policy7-16
    • § 7:3.5 : Resisting Enforcement: Contract Law7-17
  • § 7:4 : Provisional Remedies7-19
  • § 7:5 : Multiple Parties, Issues, and Proceedings7-20
    • § 7:5.1 : Classwide Arbitration7-21
    • § 7:5.2 : Joinder of Parties7-22
    • § 7:5.3 : Consolidation7-22
    • § 7:5.4 : Concurrent Proceedings7-24
  • § 7:6 : Discovery7-25
  • § 7:7 : Judicial Appointment of the Arbitrator7-26
  • § 7:8 : Enforcing an Award7-26
    • § 7:8.1 : Confirmation and Judgment7-26
    • § 7:8.2 : Challenging an Award7-28
      • [A] : Corruption, Fraud, or Undue Means7-29
      • [B] : Evident Partiality or Corruption7-30
      • [C] : Refusing to Postpone a Hearing7-31
      • [D] : Refusing to Hear Evidence7-32
      • [E] : Prejudicial Misbehavior7-32
      • [F] : Arbitrator Exceeded His or Her Powers7-32
      • [G] : Arbitrator Failed to Make a Mutual, Final, and Definite Award7-33
      • [H] : Manifest Disregard of the Law7-33
      • [I] : Public Policy7-35
  • § 7:9 : Preclusion7-35
Chapter 8: Securities ADR Robert B. von Mehren ~ Debevoise & Plimpton LLP
George W. Coombe ~
Constantine N Katsoris ~ Fordham University School of Law
Steven J. Burton ~ University of Iowa College of Law
  • § 8:1 : Introduction8-3
  • § 8:2 : Background of Securities Arbitration8-4
    • § 8:2.1 : Judicial Developments8-5
    • § 8:2.2 : Creation of SICA and the Role of the SEC8-7
  • § 8:3 : The SICA Code8-12
    • § 8:3.1 : Jurisdiction8-12
      • [A] : Application of the Code8-13
      • [B] : Industry Obligation to Arbitrate8-13
      • [C] : Predispute Arbitration Agreements8-13
      • [D] : Class Actions8-14
      • [E] : Employment Cases8-15
      • [F] : Six-Year Rule for Eligibility of Claims8-17
    • § 8:3.2 : Small Claims and Simplified Arbitration8-18
    • § 8:3.3 : Requirement of Hearing8-19
    • § 8:3.4 : Dismissal of Proceedings8-19
    • § 8:3.5 : Settlements8-20
    • § 8:3.6 : Tolling of Time Limitations8-20
    • § 8:3.7 : Classification and Qualification of Arbitrators8-21
    • § 8:3.8 : Selection of and Challenges to Arbitrators8-28
    • § 8:3.9 : Required Disclosures by Arbitrators8-30
    • § 8:3.10 : Commencement of Proceeding8-31
      • [A] : Pleadings8-31
      • [B] : Joinder and Consolidation; Multiple Parties8-33
      • [C] : Acknowledgement of Pleadings by Arbitrators8-33
      • [D] : Amendment to Pleadings8-33
    • § 8:3.11 : Representation by an Attorney8-34
      • [A] : NARs Report8-34
      • [B] : Clinical Representation8-37
    • § 8:3.12 : Designation of Time and Place of Hearing8-38
    • § 8:3.13 : Prehearing Procedures; Information Gathering8-38
      • [A] : Discovery Orders and Compliance8-39
      • [B] : Witness Lists8-40
      • [C] : Subpoenas8-40
      • [D] : Depositions8-41
      • [E] : Resolution Format8-41
    • § 8:3.14 : Expedited Procedures for the Elderly or Seriously Ill8-42
    • § 8:3.15 : Hearings8-43
      • [A] : Attendance at Hearings8-43
      • [B] : Record of Proceedings8-44
      • [C] : Oaths of Arbitrators and Witnesses8-44
      • [D] : Adjournments8-44
      • [E] : Evidence8-46
      • [F] : Reopening of Hearings8-46
      • [G] : Confidentiality8-46
    • § 8:3.16 : Rulings of Arbitrators and Awards8-48
      • [A] : Interpretation of Code and Enforcement of Arbitrators’ Rulings8-48
      • [B] : Determinations of Arbitrators8-48
      • [C] : Awards8-48
      • [D] : Payment of Awards8-51
      • [E] : Scope of Award8-52
    • § 8:3.17 : SRO Arbitration Fees8-54
    • § 8:3.18 : Large and Complex Cases8-55
    • § 8:3.19 : Tracing Uniform Code into SRO Codes8-55
    • § 8:3.20 : Conduct of Participants8-57
    • § 8:3.21 : Joint Administration8-60
  • § 8:4 : Alternatives to SRO Arbitration8-60
    • § 8:4.1 : Single, Independent Forum8-61
    • § 8:4.2 : Alternative Pilot Program8-64
    • § 8:4.3 : Back to Court8-66
  • § 8:5 : Mediation8-67
  • § 8:6 : Perceptions of Fairness: SICA Survey8-69
  • § 8:7 : The Changing Landscape8-72
  • § 8:8 : Conclusion8-74
  • Appendix 8A : Uniform Code of ArbitrationApp. 8A-1
  • Appendix 8B : SRO Composite Arbitration StatisticsApp. 8B-1
  • Appendix 8C : SRO Mediation StatisticsApp. 8C-1
Chapter 9: Intellectual Property Arbitration David W Plant ~
Robert B. von Mehren ~ Debevoise & Plimpton LLP
George W. Coombe ~
Steven J. Burton ~ University of Iowa College of Law
  • § 9:1 : Introduction9-3
  • § 9:2 : The Nature of Intellectual Property9-3
    • § 9:2.1 : What Is Intellectual Property?9-3
    • § 9:2.2 : How Do Intellectual Property Rights Arise?9-4
    • § 9:2.3 : How May Intellectual Property Rights Be Exploited?9-5
    • § 9:2.4 : How May Intellectual Property Rights Be Enforced?9-5
  • § 9:3 : Intellectual Property Disputes and the Pros and Cons of Arbitration9-5
    • § 9:3.1 : Overview9-5
    • § 9:3.2 : Why Arbitration?9-6
    • § 9:3.3 : Why Not Arbitration?9-7
  • § 9:4 : Agreeing to Arbitrate9-8
  • § 9:5 : Arbitrability of the Dispute and Enforceability of the Award9-10
    • § 9:5.1 : The New York Convention9-11
    • § 9:5.2 : Arbitrability of IP Rights: International Perspective9-12
      • [A] : Trade Secrets9-12
      • [B] : Licensing9-13
      • [C] : Ownership9-14
      • [D] : Scope and Infringement of Patents, Copyrights, and Trademarks9-14
      • [E] : Validity and Enforceability of Patents, Copyrights, and Trademarks9-15
      • [F] : ICC Report9-15
    • § 9:5.3 : Arbitrability of IP Rights: United States9-16
      • [A] : Patent Validity, Enforceability, and Infringement Issues9-16
      • [B] : Patent Interference Issues9-18
      • [C] : Copyright Issues9-18
      • [D] : Trademark Issues9-20
      • [E] : Trade Secret Misappropriation Issues9-26
      • [F] : Uniform Dispute Resolution and Domain Name Disputes9-27
    • § 9:5.4 : Suggested Contract Language with Respect to Arbitrability and Enforceability9-30
  • § 9:6 : Enforceability of an Award that Includes an Intellectual Property Component9-32
  • § 9:7 : Provisional Relief9-33
    • § 9:7.1 : Arbitral Law9-33
    • § 9:7.2 : Arbitral Rules9-34
    • § 9:7.3 : Ad Hoc, Self-Help Arrangements9-35
  • § 9:8 : Privacy and Confidentiality9-35
    • § 9:8.1 : Post-Award Cracks in the Privacy and Confidentiality Walls9-35
    • § 9:8.2 : Confidentiality During Arbitral Proceedings.9-37
  • § 9:9 : The Arbitral Tribunal9-39
  • § 9:10 : Party-Appointed Arbitrators9-41
  • § 9:11 : Multiple-Party Proceedings9-41
  • § 9:12 : Multiple Proceedings9-42
  • § 9:13 : Governing Law and Rules9-43
    • § 9:13.1 : Arbitral Law9-43
    • § 9:13.2 : Substantive Law9-43
  • § 9:14 : Issues to Be Arbitrated9-44
  • § 9:15 : The Site of the Arbitration9-44
  • § 9:16 : Prehearing Information Exchanges9-45
  • § 9:17 : The Evidentiary Hearing9-47
  • § 9:18 : Experts9-48
    • § 9:18.1 : Party-Appointed Experts9-48
    • § 9:18.2 : Tribunal-Appointed Experts9-50
  • § 9:19 : Remedies Available9-51
    • § 9:19.1 : Monetary Relief9-51
    • § 9:19.2 : Equitable Relief9-51
    • § 9:19.3 : Punitive Damages and Sanctions9-52
    • § 9:19.4 : Appellate Relief9-55
  • § 9:20 : Form of the Award9-55
  • § 9:21 : Arbitral Rules9-56
  • § 9:22 : IP Arbitrator As IP Mediator9-56
    • § 9:22.1 : Ethical Issues9-57
    • § 9:22.2 : Repairing the Relationship Versus Determining Rights9-58
    • § 9:22.3 : Some Ground Rules for Participating in Settlement Discussions9-58
Chapter 10: International Arbitration James H Carter ~ Sullivan & Cromwell LLP
Robert B. von Mehren ~ Debevoise & Plimpton LLP
George W. Coombe ~
Steven J. Burton ~ University of Iowa College of Law
  • § 10:1 : Introduction10-2
  • § 10:2 : International Arbitration’s Advantages Over Litigation10-3
    • § 10:2.1 : Enforceability of Awards Under International Conventions10-3
      • [A] : U.S. Legislation Implementing International Conventions10-5
      • [B] : What Is an “International” Arbitration Under U.S. Law?10-6
      • [C] : Why Does It Matter Whether the Arbitration Is “International”?10-7
    • § 10:2.2 : Efficiencies10-8
  • § 10:3 : International Arbitration As Shaped by Local Ideas About Litigation10-9
  • § 10:4 : Institutions and Rules10-11
    • § 10:4.1 : AAA Rules and Procedures Applicable to an “International” Case10-11
    • § 10:4.2 : Other International Arbitration Procedures in the United States10-13
    • § 10:4.3 : Administered Arbitration Systems Based Outside the United States10-15
      • [A] : International Chamber of Commerce Arbitration10-15
      • [B] : The LCIA Court of Arbitration10-16
      • [C] : National Arbitration Centers10-17
      • [D] : Regional Arbitration in the Americas10-18
    • § 10:4.4 : Specialized Types of International Commercial Arbitration10-18
      • [A] : Investment Disputes10-18
      • [B] : Intellectual Property Disputes10-19
      • [C] : Trade Disputes10-20
      • [D] : Sports Disputes10-20
  • § 10:5 : Drafting an International Dispute Resolution Clause10-20
    • § 10:5.1 : Place of Arbitration10-21
    • § 10:5.2 : Multi-Tier Clauses10-22
  • § 10:6 : Selecting Arbitrators10-22
    • § 10:6.1 : International Standards of Independence and Impartiality10-23
    • § 10:6.2 : Arbitrator Disclosure10-23
    • § 10:6.3 : Where to Find Arbitrators10-24
  • § 10:7 : Conducting the Proceedings10-24
  • § 10:8 : Enforcing the Award10-27
Chapter 11: Construction Arbitration Robert B. von Mehren ~ Debevoise & Plimpton LLP
George W. Coombe ~
Steven J. Burton ~ University of Iowa College of Law
James P Groton ~
  • § 11:1 : Introduction11-2
  • § 11:2 : Historical Changes11-2
  • § 11:3 : Construction Arbitration Today11-4
    • § 11:3.1 : Complexity11-4
    • § 11:3.2 : Requirements for Effective Arbitration11-5
      • [A] : Rules11-5
      • [B] : Experienced Arbitrators11-6
      • [C] : Effective Management11-6
      • [C][1] : Requiring Early Disclosure of Issues, Contentions, and Proof11-7
      • [C][2] : Filing Prehearing Factual Briefs11-7
      • [C][3] : Changing the Conventional Order of Proof11-7
      • [C][4] : Submitting Direct Testimonyin Writing11-8
      • [C][5] : Simultaneous Testimony of Opposing Expert Witnesses11-8
      • [C][6] : Simultaneous Testimony of Fact Witnesses11-9
      • [C][7] : Attorneys’ Summaries of Evidence11-9
      • [C][8] : “Chess Clock” Management of Time11-9
      • [C][9] : Photographs of Witnesses11-10
  • § 11:4 : Newly Developed Alternatives to Arbitration11-10
  • § 11:5 : A Look Forward11-13
  • Appendix 11A : Selective BibliographyApp. 11A-1
Chapter 12: Labor and Employment Arbitration Robert B. von Mehren ~ Debevoise & Plimpton LLP
George W. Coombe ~
Steven J. Burton ~ University of Iowa College of Law
William B Gould ~ Stanford Law School
William B Gould IV ~
  • § 12:1 : Introduction12-2
  • § 12:2 : Labor Arbitration in the Unionized Sector12-5
  • § 12:3 : Labor Arbitration and Public Law12-10
  • § 12:4 : Individual Employee-Employer Arbitration Disputes12-27
  • § 12:5 : Arbitration Process Issues in Both the Union and Nonunion Sector12-32
    • § 12:5.1 : Encouragement of Arbitration12-32
    • § 12:5.2 : Identity of the Arbitrators12-35
  • § 12:6 : The Fairness of the Arbitral Process12-40
    • § 12:6.1 : Notice and Information12-40
    • § 12:6.2 : Confidentiality12-45
    • § 12:6.3 : The Costs of Arbitration12-56
    • § 12:6.4 : Judicial Review12-63
  • § 12:7 : Conclusion12-69
  Appendices Robert B. von Mehren ~ Debevoise & Plimpton LLP
George W. Coombe ~
Steven J. Burton ~ University of Iowa College of Law
Appendix A: ICC Rules Robert B. von Mehren ~ Debevoise & Plimpton LLP
George W. Coombe ~
Steven J. Burton ~ University of Iowa College of Law
Appendix B: AAA Commercial Rules Robert B. von Mehren ~ Debevoise & Plimpton LLP
George W. Coombe ~
Steven J. Burton ~ University of Iowa College of Law
Appendix C: AAA International Rules Robert B. von Mehren ~ Debevoise & Plimpton LLP
George W. Coombe ~
Steven J. Burton ~ University of Iowa College of Law
Appendix D: CPR Domestic Rules Robert B. von Mehren ~ Debevoise & Plimpton LLP
George W. Coombe ~
Steven J. Burton ~ University of Iowa College of Law
Appendix E: CPR International Rules Robert B. von Mehren ~ Debevoise & Plimpton LLP
George W. Coombe ~
Steven J. Burton ~ University of Iowa College of Law
Appendix F: Federal Arbitration Act (9 U.S.C. § 1 et seq.) Robert B. von Mehren ~ Debevoise & Plimpton LLP
George W. Coombe ~
Steven J. Burton ~ University of Iowa College of Law
Appendix G: New York Convention Robert B. von Mehren ~ Debevoise & Plimpton LLP
George W. Coombe ~
Steven J. Burton ~ University of Iowa College of Law
  Table of Cases Robert B. von Mehren ~ Debevoise & Plimpton LLP
George W. Coombe ~
Steven J. Burton ~ University of Iowa College of Law
  Index Robert B. von Mehren ~ Debevoise & Plimpton LLP
George W. Coombe ~
Steven J. Burton ~ University of Iowa College of Law

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"[American Arbitration is] an ideal place for both the beginner to gain a quick overview of the arbitral process and for the experienced practitioner to find answers to day-to-day issues and problems."
Gerald Aksen, Arbitrator; former General Counsel, American Arbitration Association

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