TreatiseTreatise

Advertising and Commercial Speech: A First Amendment Guide
(2nd Edition)

 by Bruce E. H. Johnson, Steven G. Brody, Bruce E. H. Johnson, Steven G Brody
 
 Copyright: 2004-2014
 Last Updated: May 2014

 Product Details >> 

Product Details

  • ISBN Number: 1402404514
  • Page Count: 840
  • Number of Volumes: 1
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When are advertisers especially vulnerable to lawsuits? What legal protections do they enjoy? What is the prevailing law in this volatile area?

PLI’s Advertising and Commercial Speech: A First Amendment Guide gives you the authoritative answers. Written by First Amendment experts, it examines the origin, meaning, and legal evolution of the Supreme Court’s commercial speech doctrine, focusing on how this central doctrine’s rights and restrictions affect advertising in nearly 50 industries and professions.

Accessible enough for non-lawyers, Advertising and Commercial Speech shows you how commercial speech is defined today and when it can be regulated and even prohibited; what is the appropriate legal standard for defamation lawsuits based on advertising; how much legal ”breathing room” advertisers have for false commercial speech; what is ”disparagement” and how it can be proved by plaintiffs in court; when the media is prohibited from refusing advertisements; and when broadcasters and publishers can be sued for negligent false statements.

Updated at least once a year, Advertising and Commercial Speech: A First Amendment Guide is an invaluable reference for lawyers, advertisers, and regulators, and an illuminating resource for any individual interested in First Amendment issues.

  Tribute to Cam DeVore and Bob Sack
  Table of Contents
Chapter 1: Introduction: The First Commercial-Speech Doctrine
  • § 1:1 : Regulation of Advertising1-1
  • § 1:2 : Commercial Speech1-3
  • § 1:3 : The First “Commercial Speech” Doctrine1-5
    • § 1:3.1 : Valentine v. Chrestensen1-5
    • § 1:3.2 : The Rule in Valentine: Justice Douglas Dissents1-7
    • § 1:3.3 : New York Times Co. v. Sullivan1-9
Chapter 2: Distinguishing Commercial from Noncommercial Speech
  • § 2:1 : Introduction: What the Distinction Is and Why It Matters2-2
  • § 2:2 : The Evolution of the Constitutional Definition: The Supreme Court Cases2-8
  • § 2:3 : Lower Court Cases Considering “Combination” Advertising2-14
  • § 2:4 : Lower Court Cases on Promotion of Movies, Books, and the Like2-30
  • § 2:5 : The Expansive Treatment of Professional Marketing2-37
Chapter 3: Creation and Consolidation: The Commercial-Speech Doctrine from Bigelow to Central Hudson
  • § 3:1 : Emergence of the Modern Commercial-Speech Doctrine3-2
  • § 3:2 : Valentine v. Chrestensen in the Courts3-4
  • § 3:3 : Emerging Constitutional Protection for Advertising: The Pittsburgh Press Decision3-5
  • § 3:4 : Bigelow v. Virginia3-7
  • § 3:5 : Virginia Pharmacy3-11
  • § 3:6 : Carey v. Population Services International3-15
  • § 3:7 : Linmark Associates v. Willingboro3-16
  • § 3:8 : Bates v. State Bar of Arizona3-16
  • § 3:9 : In-Person Solicitation; Ohralik and Primus3-19
  • § 3:10 : First National Bank of Boston v. Bellotti3-22
  • § 3:11 : Friedman v. Rogers3-23
  • § 3:12 : Central Hudson and the Utilities Cases3-25
Chapter 4: Age of Anxiety: The Commercial-Speech Doctrine from Metromedia to Posadas
  • § 4:1 : Turbulence4-2
  • § 4:2 : Metromedia, Inc. v. San Diego4-3
  • § 4:3 : In re R.M.J. and Zauderer4-11
  • § 4:4 : Bolger v. Youngs Drug Products Corp.4-14
  • § 4:5 : Posadas de Puerto Rico Assocs. v. Tourism Co. of Puerto Rico4-17
Chapter 5: Fits and Starts: The Commercial-Speech Doctrine from San Francisco Arts to Ibanez
  • § 5:1 : Introduction5-2
  • § 5:2 : San Francisco Arts & Athletics, Inc. v. United States Olympic Committee5-3
  • § 5:3 : Shapero v. Kentucky Bar Association5-4
  • § 5:4 : Board of Trustees of the State University of New York v. Fox5-10
  • § 5:5 : Frank v. Minnesota Newspaper Association, Inc.5-14
  • § 5:6 : Peel v. Attorney Registration & Disciplinary Commission of Illinois5-15
  • § 5:7 : City of Cincinnati v. Discovery Network, Inc.5-20
  • § 5:8 : Edenfield v. Fane5-22
  • § 5:9 : United States v. Edge Broadcasting Co.5-23
  • § 5:10 : Ibanez v. Florida Department of Business & Professional Regulation5-26
Chapter 6: Age of Expansion: The Commercial-Speech Doctrine from Rubin to Western States
  • § 6:1 : Introduction6-2
  • § 6:2 : Rubin v. Coors Brewing Co.6-3
  • § 6:3 : Florida Bar v. Went For It, Inc.6-6
  • § 6:4 : 44 Liquormart, Inc. v. Rhode Island6-11
  • § 6:5 : Greater New Orleans Broadcasting Association v. United States6-16
  • § 6:6 : Lorillard Tobacco Co. v. Reilly6-21
  • § 6:7 : Glickman v. Wileman Bros. & Elliott, Inc. and United States v. United Foods, Inc.6-23
  • § 6:8 : Thompson v. Western States Medical Center6-28
Chapter 7: Defamation Based on Advertising
  • § 7:1 : Introduction7-2
  • § 7:2 : Case Law7-3
    • § 7:2.1 : Cases Denying Heightened Constitutional Protection for Allegedly Defamatory Commercial Statements7-3
    • § 7:2.2 : Cases Applying Standard Constitutional Protections to Defamation Claims Involving Commercial Speech7-9
  • § 7:3 : Analysis of Appropriate Constitutional Standard for Defamation Claims Based on Commercial Statements7-11
    • § 7:3.1 : Generally7-11
    • § 7:3.2 : Increased Recognition of Constitutional Protection for Truthful and Nonmisleading Commercial Speech7-14
    • § 7:3.3 : Greater Chilling Effect from Common-Law Remedies Against Commercial Speech7-16
    • § 7:3.4 : Diminished State Interest in Regulating Defamatory Commercial Speech7-18
Chapter 8: Disparagement
  • § 8:1 : Introduction8-1
  • § 8:2 : Elements of the Tort8-3
  • § 8:3 : Defamation Compared8-3
    • § 8:3.1 : Generally8-3
    • § 8:3.2 : “Of and Concerning”8-5
    • § 8:3.3 : Malice8-8
    • § 8:3.4 : Falsity8-10
    • § 8:3.5 : Privilege8-11
    • § 8:3.6 : Damages8-12
  • § 8:4 : Agricultural Disparagement Statutes8-13
Chapter 9: Lanham Act and Misappropriation Claims
  • § 9:1 : Introduction9-1
  • § 9:2 : Statutory “Commercial” Threshold Under the Lanham Act9-2
  • § 9:3 : Constitutional Limitations9-8
Chapter 10: Publishers’ Liability for Damages Resulting from False Advertising
  • § 10:1 : Generally10-2
  • § 10:2 : Analysis10-4
    • § 10:2.1 : Common Law10-4
    • § 10:2.2 : The First Amendment10-6
    • § 10:2.3 : Statutory Immunity for Online Publishers (Section 230)10-7
  • § 10:3 : Liability of the Advertiser10-10
  • § 10:4 : Liability Permitted or Prescribed10-11
    • § 10:4.1 : Negligence, Gross Negligence, or Fraud10-11
    • § 10:4.2 : Warranty10-13
  • § 10:5 : Note on Contractual and Statutory Liability for Negligent Advertising10-13
    • § 10:5.1 : Contracts10-13
    • § 10:5.2 : Statutes10-14
Chapter 11: The Right to Refuse Advertising
  • § 11:1 : General Right to Refuse11-1
  • § 11:2 : Right to Restrict Content11-4
  • § 11:3 : Exceptions to the Right to Refuse11-4
    • § 11:3.1 : Exceptions Based on Content11-4
    • § 11:3.2 : Exceptions Based on the Governmental Nature of the Defendant11-7
      • [A] : Public Transportation Property11-8
      • [B] : Public School and University Media11-12
    • § 11:3.3 : Other Exceptions11-13
Chapter 12: Compelled Commercial Speech
  • § 12:1 : Convergence of Two Doctrines12-1
  • § 12:2 : Agricultural Assessment12-2
  • § 12:3 : Alcohol Beverages12-17
  • § 12:4 : Food, Food Additives, Drugs, and Supplements12-19
  • § 12:5 : Environmental Advertising12-31
  • § 12:6 : Video Game Labeling12-31
  • § 12:7 : Audio and Video Recording Labeling12-33
  • § 12:8 : Professional Advertising12-33
    • § 12:8.1 : Accountants12-33
    • § 12:8.2 : Attorneys12-35
    • § 12:8.3 : Dentists12-42
  • § 12:9 : Securities and Commodities12-43
Chapter 13: Regulation of the Advertising Medium
  • § 13:1 : Regulation of the Broadcast Media13-3
  • § 13:2 : Regulation of Billboards and Political Signs13-6
    • § 13:2.1 : On-Site and Off-Site Signs and Billboards13-7
      • [A] : Federal Circuit Court Decisions13-7
        • [A][1] : First Circuit13-7
        • [A][2] : Second Circuit13-8
        • [A][3] : Third Circuit13-9
        • [A][4] : Fourth Circuit13-12
        • [A][5] : Fifth Circuit13-18
        • [A][6] : Sixth Circuit13-19
        • [A][7] : Seventh Circuit13-24
        • [A][8] : Eighth Circuit13-25
        • [A][9] : Ninth Circuit13-26
        • [A][10] : Tenth Circuit13-39
        • [A][11] : Eleventh Circuit13-40
      • [B] : Federal District Court and State Decisions13-46
        • [B][1] : Alabama13-46
        • [B][2] : Alaska13-47
        • [B][3] : Arizona13-47
        • [B][4] : Arkansas13-48
        • [B][5] : California13-48
        • [B][6] : Colorado13-61
        • [B][7] : Connecticut13-61
        • [B][8] : Florida13-62
        • [B][9] : Georgia13-68
        • [B][10] : Idaho13-71
        • [B][11] : Illinois13-71
        • [B][12] : Indiana13-73
        • [B][13] : Iowa13-74
        • [B][14] : Kentucky13-75
        • [B][15] : Maryland13-77
        • [B][16] : Massachusetts13-79
        • [B][17] : Michigan13-79
        • [B][18] : Minnesota13-89
        • [B][19] : Missouri13-91
        • [B][20] : Montana13-92
        • [B][21] : New Hampshire13-93
        • [B][22] : New Jersey13-94
        • [B][23] : New York13-97
        • [B][24] : North Carolina13-104
        • [B][25] : Ohio13-104
        • [B][26] : Oregon13-110
        • [B][27] : Pennsylvania13-112
        • [B][28] : Rhode Island13-114
        • [B][29] : South Carolina13-116
        • [B][30] : Texas13-117
        • [B][31] : Virginia13-124
        • [B][32] : Washington13-125
        • [B][33] : Wisconsin13-129
    • § 13:2.2 : Political Signs13-130
      • [A] : Federal Circuit Court Decisions13-131
        • [A][1] : Third Circuit13-131
        • [A][2] : Fourth Circuit13-132
        • [A][3] : Eighth Circuit13-132
        • [A][4] : Ninth Circuit13-134
        • [A][5] : Eleventh Circuit13-135
      • [B] : Federal District Court and State Decisions13-135
        • [B][1] : Alabama13-135
        • [B][2] : California13-135
        • [B][3] : Colorado13-136
        • [B][4] : Connecticut13-136
        • [B][5] : Florida13-136
        • [B][6] : Georgia13-137
        • [B][7] : Hawaii13-138
        • [B][8] : Illinois13-138
        • [B][9] : Maryland13-139
        • [B][10] : Michigan13-139
        • [B][11] : Minnesota13-140
        • [B][12] : New Jersey13-140
        • [B][13] : New York13-141
        • [B][14] : North Carolina13-142
        • [B][15] : Ohio13-143
        • [B][16] : Pennsylvania13-143
        • [B][17] : Washington13-143
        • [B][18] : West Virginia13-144
  • § 13:3 : Regulation of Electronic Media13-144
    • § 13:3.1 : Regulation of Domain Names13-144
    • § 13:3.2 : Regulation of Telemarketing and Telecommunications Advertising13-145
    • § 13:3.3 : Regulation of Electronic Mail Advertising (“Spam”)13-163
      • [A] : Introduction13-163
      • [B] : Early Antispam Efforts13-163
      • [C] : States Move Against Spam13-164
      • [D] : Federal Regulation of Spam13-166
      • [E] : First Amendment and Spam Regulations13-168
  • § 13:4 : Taxation of Media and Advertising13-175
    • § 13:4.1 : Taxation of Media13-175
    • § 13:4.2 : Taxation of Advertising13-189
Chapter 14: Regulation of Advertising Content
  • § 14:1 : Adult Entertainment14-4
  • § 14:2 : Airlines14-15
  • § 14:3 : Alcohol Beverages14-19
    • § 14:3.1 : Significance of Rubin and 44 Liquormart14-19
    • § 14:3.2 : Cases Before Rubin and 44 Liquormart14-22
    • § 14:3.3 : Effects of 44 Liquormart14-27
  • § 14:4 : Arts and Crafts14-45
  • § 14:5 : Automobiles14-47
  • § 14:6 : Brothels and Escort Services14-51
  • § 14:7 : Camps14-56
  • § 14:8 : Clinical Laboratories14-57
  • § 14:9 : Commercial Sponsorship14-57
  • § 14:10 : Concerts and Sporting Events14-60
  • § 14:11 : Contraceptives and Family Planning14-60
  • § 14:12 : Currency14-63
  • § 14:13 : Debt Collectors14-64
  • § 14:14 : Drug Paraphernalia14-67
  • § 14:15 : Environmental Advertising14-70
  • § 14:16 : Fair Employment14-73
  • § 14:17 : Fair Housing14-76
  • § 14:18 : Financial Institutions14-88
  • § 14:19 : Fireworks14-94
  • § 14:20 : Food, Food Additives, Drugs, and Supplements14-94
  • § 14:21 : Funeral Services14-118
  • § 14:22 : Gasoline14-121
  • § 14:23 : Guns and Firearms14-122
  • § 14:24 : Hearing Devices14-125
  • § 14:25 : Insurance14-126
  • § 14:26 : Jury Influence14-130
  • § 14:27 : Liquidation Sales14-134
  • § 14:28 : Lotteries and Gambling14-135
  • § 14:29 : “Made in U.S.A.” and Similar Labeling14-149
  • § 14:30 : Nonprofessional Legal Services14-150
  • § 14:31 : Pesticides14-152
  • § 14:32 : Political Advertising14-153
  • § 14:33 : Professional Advertising14-157
    • § 14:33.1 : Attorneys14-158
      • [A] : Supreme Court Cases14-158
      • [B] : Alabama14-164
      • [C] : Arkansas14-166
      • [D] : California14-166
      • [E] : Colorado14-168
      • [F] : Connecticut14-169
      • [G] : District of Columbia14-169
      • [H] : Florida14-170
      • [I] : Georgia14-178
      • [J] : Illinois14-179
      • [K] : Indiana14-181
      • [L] : Iowa14-182
      • [M] : Kentucky14-185
      • [N] : Louisiana14-186
      • [O] : Maryland14-187
      • [P] : Michigan14-187
      • [Q] : Minnesota14-189
      • [R] : Mississippi14-190
      • [S] : Nevada14-191
      • [T] : New Jersey14-192
      • [U] : New Mexico14-195
      • [V] : New York14-197
      • [W] : North Carolina14-200
      • [X] : Ohio14-201
      • [Y] : Oklahoma14-202
      • [Z] : Pennsylvania14-203
      • [AA] : South Carolina14-203
      • [BB] : Tennessee14-204
      • [CC] : Texas14-205
      • [DD] : Virginia14-207
      • [EE] : Washington14-208
      • [FF] : West Virginia14-209
      • [GG] : Wisconsin14-209
      • [HH] : Federal14-210
      • [II] : Attorney Access to Law Enforcement Information14-211
    • § 14:33.2 : Accountants14-220
      • [A] : Supreme Court Cases14-220
      • [B] : Lower Court Cases14-222
    • § 14:33.3 : Chiropractors14-226
    • § 14:33.4 : Dentists14-233
    • § 14:33.5 : Engineers14-238
    • § 14:33.6 : Interior Designers14-240
    • § 14:33.7 : Opticians14-241
    • § 14:33.8 : Pharmacists14-242
    • § 14:33.9 : Physicians14-245
    • § 14:33.10 : Psychics14-248
    • § 14:33.11 : Psychological Services14-249
  • § 14:34 : Public Utilities14-251
  • § 14:35 : Real Estate14-260
  • § 14:36 : Schools14-269
  • § 14:37 : Securities and Commodities14-273
  • § 14:38 : Solicitation of Business or Funds14-290
  • § 14:39 : Tobacco14-319
  • § 14:40 : Trade Names14-341
  • § 14:41 : Trading Cards14-346
  • § 14:42 : Video Games14-347
  Table of Cases
  Defendant-Plaintiff Table
  Index

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