On-Demand   On-Demand Web Programs

Working with Immigrants: The Intersection of Basic Immigration, Housing, and Domestic Violence Issues in California (Free)

Released on: May. 28, 2013
Running Time: 06:17:50

Running Time Segment Title Faculty Format
[01:04:36] Client Counseling & Advocacy: The Role of Race, Class and Culture Tirien Steinbach ~ Executive Director, East Bay Community Law Center
On-Demand MP3 MP4
[00:58:35] Orientation to Domestic Violence Lindsay Sweetnam ~ Community Programs Director, La Casa de Las Madres
Nancy K.D. Lemon ~ Director, Domestic Violence Practicum; Lecturer, Domestic Violence Law Seminar, University of California, Berkeley School of Law
On-Demand MP3 MP4
[01:05:00] Housing and Immigration Omar P. Calimbas ~ Staff Attorney, Asian Law Caucus
Patricia Salazar ~ Legal Services Director, Centro Legal De La Raza
Karlo Ng ~ Staff Attorney, National Housing Law Project
On-Demand MP3 MP4
[01:00:24] Domestic Violence and Housing Brenda Star Adams ~ Staff Attorney, Bay Area Legal Aid
Catherine M. Bishop ~ Senior Staff Attorney, National Housing Law Project
On-Demand MP3 MP4
[01:03:50] Immigration and Family Law Intersections When Representing Immigrant Survivors of Domestic Violence Hongvilay Thongsamouth ~ Partner, Murphy, Vu, Thongsamouth & Chatterjee, LLP
Khanh T. Nguyen ~ Staff Attorney, Asian Pacific Islander Legal Outreach
On-Demand MP3 MP4
[00:58:26] Getting Legal Status Based on Domestic Violence Lisa Frydman ~ Associate Director/Managing Attorney, Center for Gender & Refugee Studies
Cindy C. Liou ~ Staff Attorney, Asian Pacific Islander Legal Outreach
Susan Bowyer ~ Deputy Director, Immigration Center for Women and Children
On-Demand MP3 MP4

You should view this training if you would like to provide pro bono services to immigrant clients in the areas of housing, immigration, or domestic violence or you would like to improve your representation of immigrant clients generally.  Many immigrant clients require assistance with a constellation of related yet distinct issues.  This program attempts to address these particular areas of overlap.  Experienced practitioners in the areas of immigration, family law, and housing will share their expertise by providing insight into cultural issues that arise when working with immigrant clients, how these areas of law overlap to provide special protections and remedies to immigrants and domestic violence survivors, and how immigration status impacts eligibility for federally subsidized housing.

Lecture Topics  [Total time 06:17:50]

Segments with an asterisk (*) are available only with the purchase of the entire program.

  • Program Overview and Introductions* [00:06:59]
    Sharon Djemal, Linda Tam
  • Client Counseling & Advocacy: The Role of Race, Class and Culture [01:04:36]
    Tirien Steinbach
  • Orientation to Domestic Violence [00:58:35]
    Nancy K.D. Lemon, Lindsay Sweetnam
  • Housing and Immigration [01:05:00]
    Omar P. Calimbas, Patricia Salazar, Karlo Ng
  • Domestic Violence and Housing [01:00:24]
    Brenda Star Adams, Catherine M. Bishop
  • Immigration and Family Law Intersections When Representing Immigrant Survivors of Domestic Violence [01:03:50]
    Hongvilay Thongsamouth, Khanh T. Nguyen
  • Getting Legal Status Based on Domestic Violence [00:58:26]
    Susan Bowyer, Lisa Frydman, Cindy C. Liou

The purchase price of this Web Program includes the following articles from the Course Handbook available online:

  • The Role of Culture in the Lawyer-Client Relationship
    Tirien Steinbach
  • The Cycle of Violence Diagram and Explanation
    Lindsay Sweetnam
  • Power and Control Wheel
    Lindsay Sweetnam
  • Why People Stay in Abusive Relationships
    Lindsay Sweetnam
  • Immigrant Power and Control Wheel
    Nancy K.D. Lemon
  • Power and Control Tactics Used Against Immigrant Women
    Lindsay Sweetnam
  • Lesbian/Gay Power and Control Wheel
    Nancy K.D. Lemon
  • For Further Reading
    Lindsay Sweetnam, Nancy K.D. Lemon
  • Federally Assisted Housing and Immigrant Eligibility
    Karlo Ng
  • Memo: Housing Covered By Section 214 of the Housing and Community Development Act
    Karlo Ng
  • Verification of Social Security Numbers (SSNs), Social Security (SS) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) Benefits; and Effective Use of the Enterprise Income Verification (EIV) System’s Identity Verification Report, HUD Notice: PIH 2012-10 (HA)
    Karlo Ng
  • Responsibility of Certain Entities to Notify the Immigration and Naturalization Service of Any Alien Who the Entity “Knows” Is Not Lawfully Present in the United States, Federal Register, Vol. 65, No. 189, Thursday, September 28, 2000, Notices
    Karlo Ng
  • PHA Responsibility to Notify the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) of Aliens Not Lawfully Present in the United States Under Section 404 of the Welfare Reform Act, Clarification Questions and Answers, HUD
    Karlo Ng
  • Cultural Competency and Working with Immigrant Communities (Powerpoint Slides)
    Patricia Salazar
  • Immigrant Access to Federally Assisted Housing (Powerpoint Slides)
    Karlo Ng
  • Domestic Violence and Housing Outline
    Brenda Star Adams, Catherine M. Bishop
  • Safety Planning for Survivors of Abuse
    Brenda Star Adams
  • Title VI—Safe Homes for Victims of Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, Sexual Assault, And Stalking
    Catherine M. Bishop
  • Immigration and Family Law Intersections When Representing Immigrant Survivors of Domestic Violence Outline
    Hongvilay Thongsamouth, Khanh T. Nguyen
  • Domestic Violence Judicial Council Forms
    Khanh T. Nguyen
  • Affidavit of Support (I-864)
    Khanh T. Nguyen
  • Domestic Violence as a Basis for Asylum: An Analysis of 206 Case Outcomes in the United States from 1994 to 2012
    Lisa Frydman
  • Human Trafficking and Sexual Assault, September 2012
    Cindy C. Liou
  • Human Trafficking and Domestic Violence, September 2012
    Cindy C. Liou
  • Alien Victims of Certain Qualifying Criminal Activity, 8 CFR Ch. 1, §214.14
    Cindy C. Liou
  • U Visa Resources
    Cindy C. Liou, Lisa Frydman, Susan Bowyer
  • Immigration Protections for Survivors of Domestic Violence: Asylum, Vawa, U Visas, and T Visas (Powerpoint Slides)
    Cindy C. Liou, Lisa Frydman, Susan Bowyer

Presentation Material

  • Client Counseling & Advocacy: The Role of Race, Class and Culture (Power Point Slides)
    Tirien Steinbach
  • Orientation to Domestic Violence: Power and Control Wheel (Power Point Slides)
    Nancy K.D. Lemon, Lindsay Sweetnam
  • Housing and Immigration (Power Point Slides)
    Karlo Ng
  • Housing and Immigration: Cultural Competency and Working with Immigrant Communities (Power Point Slides)
    Patricia Salazar
  • Domestic Violence and Housing (Power Point Slides)
    Brenda Star Adams, Catherine M. Bishop
  • Getting Legal Status Based on Domestic Violence: Immigration Protections for Survivors of Domestic Violence (Power Point Slides)
    Susan Bowyer, Lisa Frydman, Cindy C. Liou
Co-Chair(s)
Sharon Djemal ~ Supervising Attorney & Clinical Instructor, Housing Practice, East Bay Community Law Center
Linda Tam ~ Director, Immigration Clinic, East Bay Community Law Center
Speaker(s)
Brenda Star Adams ~ Staff Attorney, Bay Area Legal Aid
Catherine M. Bishop ~ Senior Staff Attorney, National Housing Law Project
Susan Bowyer ~ Deputy Director, Immigration Center for Women and Children
Omar P. Calimbas ~ Staff Attorney, Asian Law Caucus
Lisa Frydman ~ Associate Director/Managing Attorney, Center for Gender & Refugee Studies
Nancy K.D. Lemon ~ Director, Domestic Violence Practicum; Lecturer, Domestic Violence Law Seminar, University of California, Berkeley School of Law
Cindy C. Liou ~ Staff Attorney, Asian Pacific Islander Legal Outreach
Karlo Ng ~ Staff Attorney, National Housing Law Project
Khanh T. Nguyen ~ Staff Attorney, Asian Pacific Islander Legal Outreach
Patricia Salazar ~ Legal Services Director, Centro Legal De La Raza
Tirien Steinbach ~ Executive Director, East Bay Community Law Center
Lindsay Sweetnam ~ Community Programs Director, La Casa de Las Madres
Hongvilay Thongsamouth ~ Partner, Murphy, Vu, Thongsamouth & Chatterjee, LLP

PLI makes every effort to accredit its On-Demand Web Programs and Segments.  Please check the CLE Calculator above for CLE information specific to your state.

On-Demand Web Programs and Segments are approved in:

Alabama1, Alaska, California, Colorado, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho*, Illinois , Iowa2*, Kansas, Kentucky*, Louisiana, Maine*, Mississippi, Missouri3, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire4, New Jersey, New Mexico5, New York6,  North Carolina7, North Dakota, Ohio8, Oklahoma9, Oregon*, Pennsylvania10, Rhode Island11, South Carolina, Tennessee12, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia13, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin14 and Wyoming*.

Iowa, Mississippi, Oklahoma, and Wisconsin DO NOT approve Audio Only On-Demand Web Programs.

Minnesota 
approves live webcasts ONLY

Please Note: The State Bar of Arizona does not approve or accredit CLE activities for the Mandatory Continuing Legal Education requirement. PLI programs may qualify for credit based on the requirements outlined in the MCLE Regulations and Ariz. R. Sup. Ct. Rule 45.

*PLI will apply for credit upon request. Louisiana and New Hampshire: PLI will apply for credit upon request for audio-only on-demand web programs.


1Alabama: Approval of all web based programs is limited to a maximum of 6.0 credits.

 

2Iowa:  The approval is for one year from recorded date. Does not approve of Audio-only On-Demand Webcasts.

3Missouri:  On-demand web programs are restricted to six hours of self-study credit per year.  Self-study may not be used to satisfy the ethics requirements.  Self-study can not be used for carryover credit.

 

4New Hamphsire:  The approval is for three years from recorded date.

5New Mexico:  On-Demand web programs are restricted to 4.0 self-study credits per year. 


6New York:  Newly admitted attorneys may not take non-traditional course formats such as on-demand Web Programs or live Webcasts for CLE credit. Newly admitted attorneys not practicing law in the United States, however, may earn 12 transitional credits in non-traditional formats. 

7North Carolina:  A maximum of 4 credits per reporting period may be earned by participating in on-demand web programs. 


8Ohio:  To confirm that the web program has been approved, please refer to the list of Ohio’s Approved Self Study Activities at http://www.sconet.state.oh.us.  Online programs are considered self-study.  Ohio attorneys have a 6 credit self-study limit per compliance period.  The Ohio CLE Board states that attorneys must have a 100% success rate in clicking on timestamps to receive ANY CLE credit for an online program.

9Oklahoma:  Up to 6 credits may be earned each year through computer-based or technology-based legal education programs.


10Pennsylvania:  PA attorneys may only receive a maximum of four (4) hours of distance learning credit per compliance period. All distance learning programs must be a minimum of 1 full hour.
 

11Rhode Island:  Audio Only On-Demand Web Programs are not approved for credit.  On-Demand Web Programs must have an audio and video component.

12Tennessee:  The approval is for the calendar year in which the live program was presented.

13Virginia: All distance learning courses are to be done in an educational setting, free from distractions.

14Wisconsin: Ethics credit is not allowed.  The ethics portion of the program will be approved for general credit.  There is a 10 credit limit for on-demand web programs during every 2-year reporting period.  Does not approve of Audio-only On-Demand Webcasts.


Running time and CLE credit hours are not necessarily the same. Please be aware that many states do not permit credit for luncheon and keynote speakers.


If you have already received credit for attending some or the entire program, please be aware that state administrators do not permit you to accrue additional credit for repeat viewing even if an additional credit certificate is subsequently issued.


Note that some states limit the number of credit hours attorneys may claim for online CLE activities, and state rules vary with regard to whether online CLE activities qualify for participatory or self-study credits. For more information, call Customer Service (800) 260-4PLI (4754) or e-mail info@pli.edu.

 
Related Items

Handbook  Course Handbook Archive

Working with Immigrants: The Intersection of Basic Immigration, Housing, and Domestic Violence Issues in California Sharon Djemal, East Bay Community Law Center
Linda Tam, East Bay Community Law Center
 
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