On-Demand   On-Demand Web Programs

Working with Immigrants: The Intersection of Basic Immigration, Housing, and Domestic Violence Issues in California 2017 (Free)

Released on: May. 3, 2017
Running Time: 06:14:35

You should view this training if you would like to provide pro bono services to immigrant clients in the areas of housing, immigration, or domestic violence or you would like to improve your representation of immigrant clients generally.  Many immigrant clients require assistance with a constellation of related yet distinct issues.  This program attempts to address these particular areas of overlap.  Experienced practitioners in the areas of immigration, family law, and housing will share their expertise by providing insight into cultural issues that arise when working with immigrant clients, how these areas of law overlap to provide special protections and remedies to immigrants and domestic violence survivors, and how immigration status impacts eligibility for federally subsidized housing.

You will learn:

  • Cultural competency issues to be aware of when working with immigrant clients generally and specific issues that arise in housing and domestic violence cases
  • What is domestic violence and how does it impact immigrant and LGBT communities
  • How immigration status affects eligibility for federally subsidized housing
  • Fair Housing laws that protect immigrants and domestic violence survivors
  • Special housing protections for domestic violence survivors in the Violence Against Women Act and other California laws
  • What family law issues are implicated when working with immigrant survivors of domestic violence
  • How to get your client legal immigration status based on domestic violence


Legal aid and private practitioners who work with immigrant clients or who would like to provide pro bono services to immigrant clients in the areas of immigration, housing, or domestic violence will benefit from this program.

Lecture Topics [Total time 6:14:35]

Segments with an asterisk (*) are available only with the purchase of the entire program.

  • Program Overview and Introductions* [00:05:17]
    Brenda Star Adams, Linda Tam
  • Client Counseling & Advocacy: The Role of Race, Class and Culture in the Elimination of Bias [01:04:53]
    Tirien Steinbach
  • Orientation to Domestic Violence [01:01:21]
    Amanda Case, Nancy K.D. Lemon
  • Housing and Immigration [00:59:29]
    Lauren DeMartini, Ubaldo Fernandez
  • Domestic Violence and Housing [01:00:50]
    Brenda Star Adams, Karlo Ng
  • Family Law and Immigration (TRO, Custody, Divorce) [00:59:25]
    Trina Chatterjee, Nicole Ford
  • Getting Legal Status Based on Domestic Violence [01:03:20]
    Eunice Lee, Cindy C. Liou, Catherine Seitz

The purchase price of this Web Program includes the following articles from the Course Handbook available online:

  • COMPLETE COURSE HANDBOOK
  • The Role of Culture in the Lawyer-Client Relationship
    Tirien Steinbach
  • Power and Control Wheel
    Nancy K.D. Lemon, Amanda Case
  • Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Trans Power and Control Wheel
    Amanda Case, Nancy K.D. Lemon
  • Immigrant Power and Control Wheel
    Amanda Case, Nancy K.D. Lemon
  • Domestic Violence Orientation (PowerPoint slides)
    Amanda Case, Nancy K.D. Lemon
  • Housing and Immigrants: Types of Immigration Status, Eligibility of Subsidized Housing for Immigrants, and Advocating for Immigrants’ Housing Rights
    Ubaldo Fernandez, Lauren DeMartini
  • Housing and Immigrants: Advocating for Access, Safety and Affordability for Immigrants (PowerPoint slides)
    Ubaldo Fernandez, Lauren DeMartini
  • Domestic Violence and Housing: How California Laws, the Fair Housing Act, and the Violence Against Women Act Protect Survivors of Domestic Violence from Denial of Housing, Help them Defend and Avoid Eviction, and Aid Survivors in Maintaining Safe and Stable Housing
    Karlo Ng, Brenda Star Adams
  • Domestic Violence Safety Plan Checklist
    Brenda Star Adams, Karlo Ng
  • Immigration Raids Alert, Prepare for Raids and Protect Yourself, January 2016, National Immigration Law Center
    Brenda Star Adams, Karlo Ng
  • Assessing Claims of Housing Discrimination Against Victims of Domestic Violence under the Fair Housing Act (FHAct) and the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (February 2011)
    Brenda Star Adams, Karlo Ng
  • VAWA 2013 Continues Vital Housing Protections for Survivors and Provides New Safeguards (January 2014)
    Karlo Ng
  • Know Your Rights: Domestic and Sexual Violence and Federally Assisted Housing
    Karlo Ng
  • Eligibility of Battered Noncitizen Self-Petitioners for Financial Assistance Under Section 214 of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1980, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (December 2016)
    Brenda Star Adams, Karlo Ng
  • Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013: Implementation in HUD Housing Programs, Final Rule, Federal Register, Vol. 81, No. 221, November 2016
    Brenda Star Adams, Karlo Ng
  • Certification of Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, Sexual Assault, or Stalking, and Alternate Documentation, Form HUD-5382, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
    Karlo Ng, Brenda Star Adams
  • Notice of Occupancy Rights under the Violence Against Women Act, Form HUD-5380, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
    Karlo Ng, Brenda Star Adams
  • Model Emergency Transfer Plan for Victims of Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, Sexual Assault, or Stalking, Form HUD-5381, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
    Brenda Star Adams, Karlo Ng
  • Emergency Transfer Request for Certain Victims of Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, Sexual Assault, or Stalking, Form HUD-5383, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
    Karlo Ng, Brenda Star Adams
  • California Family Code Statutes (Sections 3011, 3020, 3040, 3044, 3424, 4320 and 2210)
    Trina Chatterjee
  • Domestic Violence Prevention Forms (DV-100, DV-101, DV-110 and DV-130)
    Trina Chatterjee
  • U Nonimmigrant Status (Form I-918) Waitlist Notice, February 3, 2014, U.S. Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services
    Catherine Seitz, Eunice Lee, Cindy C. Liou
  • Human Trafficking and Sexual Assault, September 2012, Freedom Network
    Eunice Lee, Cindy C. Liou, Catherine Seitz
  • Human Trafficking and Domestic Violence, September 2012, Freedom Network
    Eunice Lee, Catherine Seitz, Cindy C. Liou
  • Human Trafficking and Sexual Assault, Updated April 2015, Freedom Network
    Catherine Seitz, Eunice Lee, Cindy C. Liou
  • Human Trafficking and Domestic Violence, Updated April 2015, Freedom Network
    Eunice Lee, Catherine Seitz, Cindy C. Liou
  • Domestic Violence as a Basis for Asylum: An Analysis of 206 Case Outcomes in the United States from 1994 to 2012, Hastings Women’s Law Journal, Volume 24:1, Winter 2013
    Blaine Bookey, Catherine Seitz, Eunice Lee, Cindy C. Liou
  • Gender-Based Asylum Post-Matter of A-R-C-G-: Evolving Standards and Fair Application of the Law, Southwestern Journal of International Law, Volume 22, 2016
    Blaine Bookey, Eunice Lee, Cindy C. Liou, Catherine Seitz
  • Immigration Options for Victims of Crimes
    Eunice Lee, Catherine Seitz, Cindy C. Liou
  • 8 CFR Chapter 1 2012, § 214.14—Alien Victims of Certain Qualifying Criminal Activity
    Eunice Lee, Catherine Seitz, Cindy C. Liou
  • T Visa Regulations, Federal Register, Vol. 81, No. 243, December 2016
    Catherine Seitz, Cindy C. Liou, Eunice Lee
  • Summary of January 25 and 27, 2017 Executive Actions, Possible Impacts on Survivors of Domestic and Sexual Violence
    Eunice Lee, Catherine Seitz, Cindy C. Liou
  • U Visa Resources
    Cindy C. Liou, Catherine Seitz, Eunice Lee
  • Immigration Protections for Survivors of Domestic Violence: Asylum, VAWA, U Visas, and T Visas (PowerPoint slides)
    Eunice Lee, Catherine Seitz, Cindy C. Liou

 

Presentation Material

 

  • Introduction to Cultural Literacy (PowerPoint slides)
    Tirien Steinbach
  • Domestic Violence Orientation (PowerPoint slides)
    Amanda Case, Nancy K.D. Lemon
  • Housing and Immigrants: Advocating for Access, Safety and Affordability for Immigrants (PowerPoint slides)
    Lauren DeMartini, Ubaldo Fernandez
  • Domestic Violence and Housing (PowerPoint slides)
    Karlo Ng, Brenda Star Adams
  • Family Law & Immigration: Common Family Law Issues for Immigrant Survivors of Domestic Violence (PowerPoint slides)
    Trina Chatterjee, Nicole Ford
  • Immigration Protections for Survivors of Domestic Violence: Asylum, VAWA, U Visas, and T Visas (PowerPoint slides)
    Eunice Lee, Cindy C. Liou, Catherine Seitz
Co-Chair(s)
Brenda Star Adams ~ Family Law Coordinator, Domestic Violence Unit, Alameda County, Bay Area Legal Aid
Linda Tam ~ Director, Immigration Practice, East Bay Community Law Center
Speaker(s)
Amanda Case ~ Attorney,
Trina Chatterjee ~ Partner, Murphy, Vu, Thongsamouth & Chatterjee, LLP
Lauren DeMartini ~ Staff Attorney, Bay Area Legal Aid
Ubaldo Fernandez ~ Staff Attorney/Clinical Supervisor, Housing Practice, East Bay Community Law Center
Nicole Ford ~ Law Offices of Nicole Ford
Eunice Lee ~ Co-Legal Director, Center for Gender & Refugee Studies
Nancy K.D. Lemon ~ Director, Domestic Violence Practicum, Co-Founder and Legal Director, Family Violence Appellate Project, University of California, Berkeley School of Law
Cindy C. Liou ~ Deputy Director of Legal Services, Kids in Need of Defense (KIND)
Karlo Ng ~ Staff Attorney, National Housing Law Project
Catherine Seitz ~ Legal Director, Legal Services for Children
Tirien Steinbach ~ Executive Director, East Bay Community Law Center
General credit information about this format appears below. For credit information specific to this program, please choose your jurisdiction(s) in the Credit Information box on the right-hand side of this page.

PLI’s live and on-demand webcasts are single-user license products intended for an individual registrant only. Credit will be issued only to the individual registered.


U.S. MCLE States

Alabama:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “online” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of online programs per reporting period.

Alaska:  All PLI products can fulfill Alaska’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Arizona:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “interactive CLE” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via interactive CLE programs.

Arkansas:  PLI’s on-demand web programs are not approved for Arkansas CLE credit.

California:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “participatory” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via participatory programs.

Colorado:  All PLI products can fulfill Colorado’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Connecticut: Effective January 1, 2017, all PLI products can fulfill Connecticut’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Delaware:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “eCLE” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of eCLE per reporting period, no more than 6 of which may be audio-only.

Florida:  All PLI products can fulfill Florida’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Georgia:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “in-house” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 in-house credits per reporting period.

Hawaii:  All PLI products can fulfill Hawaii’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Idaho:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 15 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Illinois:  All PLI products can fulfill Illinois' CLE requirements for experienced attorneys. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Indiana:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “distance education” credit. Attorneys are limited to 9 credits of distance education per reporting period.

Iowa:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “unmoderated” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of unmoderated programs per reporting period.

Kansas:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “prerecorded” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of prerecorded programs per reporting period.

Kentucky:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “non-live” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 non-live credits per reporting period.

Louisiana:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 4 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Maine:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 5.5 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Minnesota:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “on-demand” credit. Attorneys are limited to 15 on-demand credits per reporting period.

Mississippi:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “distance learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of distance learning per reporting period.

Missouri:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Montana:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 5 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Nebraska:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “computer-based learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 5 credits of computer-based learning per reporting period.

Nevada:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via self-study programs.

New Hampshire:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of self-study per reporting period.

New Jersey:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “alternative verifiable learning formats” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of alternative verifiable learning formats per reporting period.

New Mexico:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 4 credits of self-study per reporting period.

New York

Experienced Attorneys:  All PLI products can fulfill New York’s CLE requirements for experienced attorneys. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Newly Admitted Attorneys:  PLI’s transitional on-demand web programs can be used to fulfill the requirements for New York newly admitted attorneys. Only professional practice and law practice management credits may be earned via transitional on-demand web programs. Ethics and skills credits may not be earned via on-demand web programs.

North Carolina:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “online” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of online programs per reporting period.

North Dakota:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 15 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Ohio:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Oklahoma:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “online, on-demand” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of online, on-demand programs per reporting period.

Oregon:  All PLI products can fulfill Oregon’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Pennsylvania:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “distance learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of distance learning per reporting period.

Puerto Rico:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “non-traditional” credit. Attorneys are limited to 8 credits of non-traditional programs per reporting period.

Rhode Island:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “on-demand” credit. Attorneys are limited to 3 on-demand credits per reporting period.

South Carolina:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “alternatively delivered” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of alternatively delivered programs per reporting period.

Tennessee:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “distance learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 8 credits of distance learning per reporting period.

Texas:  All PLI products can fulfill Texas’ CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Utah:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Vermont:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 10 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Virgin Islands:  All PLI products can fulfill the Virgin Islands’ CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Virginia:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “pre-recorded” credit. Attorneys are limited to 8 credits of pre-recorded programs per reporting period.

Washington:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “A/V” credit. Attorneys are limited to 22.5 credits of A/V programs per reporting period.

West Virginia:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “online” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of online instruction per reporting period.

Wisconsin:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “repeated, on-demand” credit. Attorneys are limited to 10 credits of repeated, on-demand programs per reporting period. No ethics credits can be earned via on-demand web programs.

Wyoming:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of self-study per reporting period.


CPD Jurisdictions

British Columbia (CPD-BC):  PLI’s on-demand web programs are not eligible for CPD-BC credit unless viewed with at least one other attorney or an articled student. In this case, the credit must be recorded as a “study group.”

Ontario (CPD-ON):  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “recorded” credit. If viewed without a colleague, attorneys are limited to 6 credits of recorded programs per year. If viewed with at least one colleague, there is no limit to the number of credits that can be earned via recorded programs.

Quebec (CPD-QC):  PLI’s on-demand web programs can fulfill Quebec’s CPD requirements.

Hong Kong (CPD-HK):  PLI’s on-demand web programs are not approved for CPD-HK credit.

United Kingdom (CPD-UK):  PLI’s on-demand web programs can fulfill the United Kingdom’s CPD requirements.

Australia (CPD-AUS):  PLI’s on-demand web programs may fulfill Australia’s CPD requirements. Credit limits for on-demand web programs vary according to jurisdiction. Please refer to your jurisdiction’s CPD information page for specifics.


Other Credit Types

CPE Credit (NASBA):  Select on-demand web programs qualify as “QAS Self-Study” credit. Please check the Credit Information box on the right-hand side of this page to verify CPE credit availability.

IRS Continuing Education (IRS-CE):  PLI’s on-demand web programs may fulfill IRS-CE requirements. To request IRS-CE credit, please notify PLI at plicredits@pli.edu of your request and include your Preparer Tax Identification Number (PTIN).

Certified Fraud Examiner CPE:  PLI’s on-demand web programs may fulfill Certified Fraud Examiner CPE requirements. To request CPE credit or find out which programs offer CPE, please contact PLI at plicredits@pli.edu.

IAPP Continuing Privacy Credit (CPE):  PLI’s on-demand web programs may fulfill Privacy CPE credit requirements.

HR Recertification (HRCI):  PLI’s on-demand web programs may fulfill HR credit requirements.

SHRM Recertification (SHRM):  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as "self-paced" credit. SHRM professionals are limited to 30 credits of self-paced programs per recertification period.

Compliance Certification Board (CCB):  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Candidates are limited to 10 self-study credits per 12-month period, and certification holders are limited to 20 self-study credits per 2-year renewal period.

Certified Anti-Money Laundering Specialists Certification (CAMS):  PLI’s on-demand web programs are not approved for CAMS credit.

New York State Social Worker Continuing Education (SW CPE):  PLI’s on-demand web programs are not approved for SW CPE credit.

 

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