On-Demand   On-Demand Web Programs

Wage & Hour Litigation and Compliance 2016

Released on: Feb. 11, 2016
Running Time: 06:12:18

Running Time Segment Title Faculty Format
[01:01:28] U.S. Department of Labor's Enforcement of the Wage & Hour Laws David S Fortney ~ Fortney & Scott, LLC
Hon. M. Patricia Smith ~ Solicitor of Labor, U.S. Department of Labor
On-Demand MP3 MP4
[00:56:44] “White Collar” Exemptions: Effect of DOL Regulations and Case Law Update George A Hanson ~ Stueve Siegel Hanson LLP
Ellen C Kearns ~ Constangy, Brooks, Smith & Prophete, LLP
Hon. M. Patricia Smith ~ Solicitor of Labor, U.S. Department of Labor
On-Demand MP3 MP4
[01:02:33] Wage and Hour Compliance Pitfalls Kristen H Albertson ~ Senior Director , Walmart Stores, Inc.
Matthew W Lampe ~ Jones Day
Susan N Eisenberg ~ Cozen O'Connor
On-Demand MP3 MP4
[01:01:59] The Latest on Arbitration Agreements and Class Waivers Molly A Brooks ~ Outten & Golden LLP
Timothy J Long ~ Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP
Hon. Kathleen A Roberts ~ Mediator and Arbitrator , JAMS
On-Demand MP3 MP4
[00:58:40] Settlement of Class and Collective Actions and Attorneys’ Fees and Costs Christopher A Parlo ~ Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP
Michele R Fisher ~ Nichols Kaster, PLLP
On-Demand MP3 MP4
[01:03:37] Ethical Issues Arising in Discovery During Wage & Hour Litigation James M Lemonedes ~ Fox Rothschild LLP
Jason C Marsili ~ Posner & Rosen LLP
Lisa "Lee" A Schreter ~ Littler Mendelson, P.C.
Hon. Andrew J Peck ~ United States Magistrate Judge, United States District Court, Southern District of New York
On-Demand MP3 MP4

Wage and hour litigation remains steady in the courts, and is on the rise in arbitration.  Attorneys, as well as human resources and compliance personnel must keep up to date on the latest legal developments, be informed about DOL initiatives and regulations, have knowledge of the nuances of paying employees correctly, and understand the pros and cons of arbitration agreements and class action waivers.  For litigators, it is essential to understand and analyze the ethical issues and technological challenges that arise in discovery when prosecuting or defending a class or collective actions, and to have knowledge of the intricacies of when and how to settle these actions.

This program brings together nationally recognized employer and employee advocates, prominent in-house counsel, neutrals and the Solicitor of Labor from the U.S. Department of Labor, who will provide timely updates and share their perspectives, insights and experiences.

This program is designed for all practitioners who are involved in wage and hour issues, at all knowledge and experience levels, whether from the perspective of outside counsel or in-house counsel in the private and public sectors, labor union attorneys, representatives of individuals or groups of employees, or human resources and corporate compliance executives and representatives. Litigators, government regulators and advisors, judges, arbitrators and mediators in the wage and hour area will also find this program particularly valuable.

Special Feature

• Earn one hour of Ethics credit

 Credit Offered

• CLE and HR Recertification

Lecture Topics [Total time 06:12:18]

Segments with an asterisk (*) are available only with the purchase of the entire program.


  • Opening Remarks and Introduction* [00:07:17]
    Michele R. Fisher, David S. Fortney
  • U.S. Department of Labor's Enforcement of the Wage & Hour Laws [01:01:28]
    David S. Fortney, Hon. M. Patricia Smith
  • “White Collar” Exemptions: Effect of DOL Regulations and Case Law Update [00:56:44]
    George A. Hanson, Ellen C. Kearns, Hon. M. Patricia Smith
  • Wage and Hour Compliance Pitfalls [01:02:33]
    Susan N. Eisenberg, Matthew W. Lampe, Kristen H. Albertson
  • The Latest on Arbitration Agreements and Class Waivers [01:01:59]
    Timothy J. Long, Hon. Kathleen A Roberts, Molly A. Brooks
  • Settlement of Class and Collective Actions and Attorneys’ Fees and Costs [00:58:40]
    Michele R. Fisher, Christopher A. Parlo
  • Ethical Issues Arising in Discovery During Wage & Hour Litigation [01:03:37]
    James M. Lemonedes, Jason C. Marsili, Lisa "Lee" A. Schreter, Hon. Andrew J. Peck

The purchase price of this Web Program includes the following articles from the Course Handbook available online:


  • COMPLETE COURSE HANDBOOK
  • Home Health Care Regulations and Litigation Matters
    M. Patricia Smith, David S. Fortney
  • Fair Labor Standards Act “Overtime Exemptions” Materials
    M. Patricia Smith, David S. Fortney
  • “Fair Pay and Safe Workplaces” Materials
    M. Patricia Smith, David S. Fortney
  • “Non-Retaliation for Disclosure of Compensation Information” Materials
    David S. Fortney, M. Patricia Smith
  • “Establishing a Minimum Wage for Contractors” Materials
    David S. Fortney, M. Patricia Smith
  • Establishing Paid Sick Leave for Federal Contractors
    M. Patricia Smith, David S. Fortney
  • Recent Relevant Wage & Hour Division Press Releases
    David S. Fortney, M. Patricia Smith
  • 2015 Pending Regulation Chart
    David S. Fortney, M. Patricia Smith
  • Update on Case Law Developments in Wage and Hour Litigation
    Ellen C. Kearns
  • Proper Classification of Workers, Employees vs. Independent Contractors: Tips, Meals and Lodging, Breaks (Substantive Outline)
    Susan N. Eisenberg
  • Arbitration Agreements: An Overview of this Ever-Evolving Landscape
    Melissa C. Hammock, Timothy J. Long
  • Trends in Wage & Hour Case Settlement and Attorneys Fees and Costs (Substantive Outline)
    Michele R. Fisher
  • Ethical Issues Arising in Discovery During Wage & Hour Litigation (Substantive Outline) (November 12, 2015)
    James M. Lemonedes
  • Ureta and Dito v. AT&T Services, Inc., Plaintiffs First Request for Production of Documents, Case No. 15-cv-03653-VC (October 20, 2015)
    Jason C. Marsili
  • Ureta and Dito v. AT&T Services, Inc., Notice of Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 30(b)(6) Deposition, Case No. 15-cv-03653-VC (October 20, 2015)
    Jason C. Marsili
  • Ethical Issues Arising in Discovery During Wage & Hour Litigation (November 12, 2015)
    Amy Palesch, Lisa "Lee" A. Schreter

Presentation Material


  • “White Collar” Exemptions: Effect of DOL Regulations and Case Law Update
    Ellen C. Kearns
  • Wage and Hour Compliance Pitfalls
    Kristen H. Albertson, Susan N. Eisenberg, Matthew W. Lampe
  • The Latest on Arbitration Agreements and Class Waivers
    Molly A. Brooks, Timothy J. Long, Hon. Kathleen A Roberts
  • Settlement of Class and Collective Actions and Attorneys’ Fees and Costs
    Michele R. Fisher, Christopher A. Parlo
Co-Chair(s)
Michele R. Fisher ~ Nichols Kaster, PLLP
David S. Fortney ~ Fortney & Scott, LLC
Speaker(s)
Kristen H. Albertson ~ Senior Director , Walmart Stores, Inc.
Molly A. Brooks ~ Outten & Golden LLP
Susan N. Eisenberg ~ Cozen O'Connor
George A. Hanson ~ Stueve Siegel Hanson LLP
Ellen C. Kearns ~ Constangy, Brooks, Smith & Prophete, LLP
Matthew W. Lampe ~ Jones Day
James M. Lemonedes ~ Fox Rothschild LLP
Timothy J. Long ~ Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP
Jason C. Marsili ~ Posner & Rosen LLP
Christopher A. Parlo ~ Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP
Hon. Andrew J. Peck ~ United States Magistrate Judge, United States District Court, Southern District of New York
Hon. Kathleen A Roberts ~ Mediator and Arbitrator , JAMS
Lisa "Lee" A. Schreter ~ Littler Mendelson, P.C.
Hon. M. Patricia Smith ~ Solicitor of Labor, U.S. Department of Labor
General credit information about this format appears below. For credit information specific to this program, please choose your jurisdiction(s) in the Credit Information box on the right-hand side of this page.

PLI’s live and on-demand webcasts are single-user license products intended for an individual registrant only. Credit will be issued only to the individual registered.


U.S. MCLE States

Alabama:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “online” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of online programs per reporting period.

Alaska:  All PLI products can fulfill Alaska’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Arizona:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “interactive CLE” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via interactive CLE programs.

Arkansas:  PLI’s on-demand web programs are not approved for Arkansas CLE credit.

California:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “participatory” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via participatory programs.

Colorado:  All PLI products can fulfill Colorado’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Delaware:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “eCLE” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of eCLE per reporting period, no more than 6 of which may be audio-only.

Florida:  All PLI products can fulfill Florida’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Georgia:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “in-house” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 in-house credits per reporting period.

Hawaii:  All PLI products can fulfill Hawaii’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Idaho:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 15 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Illinois:  All PLI products can fulfill Illinois' CLE requirements for experienced attorneys. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Indiana:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “distance education” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of distance education per reporting period.

Iowa:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “unmoderated” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of unmoderated programs per reporting period.

Kansas:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “non-traditional” credit. Attorneys are limited to 5 credits of non-traditional programs per reporting period.

Kentucky:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “non-live” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 non-live credits per reporting period.

Louisiana:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 4 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Maine:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 5.5 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Minnesota:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “on-demand” credit. Attorneys are limited to 15 on-demand credits per reporting period.

Mississippi:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “distance learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of distance learning per reporting period.

Missouri:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Montana:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 5 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Nebraska:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “computer-based learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 5 credits of computer-based learning per reporting period.

Nevada:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via self-study programs.

New Hampshire:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of self-study per reporting period.

New Jersey:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “alternative verifiable learning formats” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of alternative verifiable learning formats per reporting period.

New Mexico:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 4 credits of self-study per reporting period.

New York

Experienced Attorneys:  All PLI products can fulfill New York’s CLE requirements for experienced attorneys. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Newly Admitted Attorneys:  PLI’s transitional on-demand web programs can be used to fulfill the requirements for New York newly admitted attorneys. Only professional practice and law practice management credits may be earned via transitional on-demand web programs. Ethics and skills credits may not be earned via on-demand web programs.

North Carolina:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “online” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of online programs per reporting period.

North Dakota:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 15 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Ohio:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Oklahoma:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “online, on-demand” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of online, on-demand programs per reporting period.

Oregon:  All PLI products can fulfill Oregon’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Pennsylvania:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “distance learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of distance learning per reporting period.

Puerto Rico:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “non-traditional” credit. Attorneys are limited to 8 credits of non-traditional programs per reporting period.

Rhode Island:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “on-demand” credit. Attorneys are limited to 3 on-demand credits per reporting period.

South Carolina:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “alternatively delivered” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of alternatively delivered programs per reporting period.

Tennessee:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “distance learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 8 credits of distance learning per reporting period.

Texas:  All PLI products can fulfill Texas’ CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Utah:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Vermont:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 10 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Virgin Islands:  All PLI products can fulfill the Virgin Islands’ CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Virginia:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “pre-recorded” credit. Attorneys are limited to 8 credits of pre-recorded programs per reporting period.

Washington:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “A/V” credit. Attorneys are limited to 22.5 credits of A/V programs per reporting period.

West Virginia:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “online” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of online instruction per reporting period.

Wisconsin:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “repeated, on-demand” credit. Attorneys are limited to 10 credits of repeated, on-demand programs per reporting period. No ethics credits can be earned via on-demand web programs.

Wyoming:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of self-study per reporting period.


CPD Jurisdictions

British Columbia (CPD-BC):  PLI’s on-demand web programs are not eligible for CPD-BC credit unless viewed with at least one other attorney or an articled student. In this case, the credit must be recorded as a “study group.”

Ontario (CPD-ON):  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “recorded” credit. If viewed without a colleague, attorneys are limited to 6 credits of recorded programs per year. If viewed with at least one colleague, there is no limit to the number of credits that can be earned via recorded programs.

Quebec (CPD-QC):  PLI’s on-demand web programs can fulfill Quebec’s CPD requirements.

Hong Kong (CPD-HK):  PLI’s on-demand web programs are not approved for CPD-HK credit.

United Kingdom (CPD-UK):  PLI’s on-demand web programs can fulfill the United Kingdom’s CPD requirements.


Other Credit Types

CPE Credit (NASBA):  Select on-demand web programs qualify as “QAS Self-Study” credit. Please check the Credit Information box on the right-hand side of this page to verify CPE credit availability.

IRS Continuing Education (IRS-CE):  PLI’s on-demand web programs may fulfill IRS-CE requirements. To request IRS-CE credit, please notify PLI at cleadministrator@pli.edu of your request and include your Preparer Tax Identification Number (PTIN).

Certified Fraud Examiner CPE:  PLI’s on-demand web programs may fulfill Certified Fraud Examiner CPE requirements. To request CPE credit or find out which programs offer CPE, please contact PLI at cleadministrator@pli.edu.

IAPP Continuing Privacy Credit (CPE):  PLI’s on-demand web programs may fulfill Privacy CPE credit requirements.

HR Recertification (HRCI):  PLI’s on-demand web programs may fulfill HR credit requirements.

IIEI Recertification:  PLI’s on-demand web programs may qualify for the Continuing Education Units (CEUs) necessary to fulfill the Certified U.S. Export Compliance Officer® (CUSECO) continuing education requirements.

 

Related Items

Handbook  Course Handbook Archive

Wage & Hour Litigation and Compliance 2016 David S Fortney, Fortney & Scott, LLC
Michele R Fisher, Nichols Kaster, PLLP
 
Print Share Email

  • FOLLOW PLI:
  • facebook
  • twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • GooglePlus
  • RSS

All Contents Copyright © 1996-2016 Practising Law Institute. Continuing Legal Education since 1933.