On-Demand   On-Demand Web Programs

Social Media 2017: Addressing Corporate Risks

Released on: Feb. 18, 2017
Running Time: 06:32:32

Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, Pinterest, Snapchat, Twitter, Yelp, YouTube and other social media sites are transforming not only the daily lives of consumers, but also how companies interact with consumers.  Indeed, even the largest, most conservative blue-chip corporations have embraced social media; one study revealed that, of the Fortune Global 500, 93% were on LinkedIn; 85% had Twitter accounts; 74% had a presence on Facebook; and 64% had a YouTube channel; these numbers will only increase over time.

However, along with the exciting new marketing opportunities presented by social media comes challenging new legal issues.  In seeking to capitalize on the social media gold rush, is your company taking the time to identify and address the attendant legal risks?  The good news is that, merely by undertaking simple, low-cost precautions, companies seeking to use social media can significantly reduce their potential liability exposure.  

You will learn:

  • How social media is creating new business opportunities – and new legal risks – for businesses
  • The rise of online contractual eco-systems: what every company should know
  • Social media usage in the workplace: identifying risks and minimizing liability
  • Legal hurdles and solutions in making marketing uses of user-generated content
  • Native advertising, hashtags and other social media advertising issues
  • Geo-location tracking, interest-based advertising and other privacy-related developments
  • Practical tips for handling real-world issues

Special Features:

  • Top regulators discuss best practices for staying out of trouble in using social media and mobile apps
  • In-house panel addresses hot issues and emerging trends, and provides creative solutions
  • Earn one hour of Ethics credit

Both in-house counsel and outside counsel, and business professionals who need to be on the cutting edge of the legal issues surrounding corporate use of social media will benefit from this program.


Lecture Topics [Total time 06:32:32]

Segments with an asterisk (*) are available only with the purchase of the entire program.


  • Introduction* [00:03:15]
    John F. Delaney
  • An Overview of Social Media Law and Best Practices: What Every Company Needs to Know [02:11:46]
    John F. Delaney, Aaron P. Rubin
  • Social Media in the Workplace: Emerging Issues [01:01:54]
    Kelly Ann Bird
  • Social Media, Mobile Apps and the Emerging Regulatory Landscape [01:00:23]
    D. Reed Freeman, Jr., Jarad Brown, Heather L. Maples, Noah Stein
  • Legal Ethics and Social Media [00:59:05]
    Kathy Rose
  • A View from the Trenches: Hot Issues, Creative Solutions [01:16:09]
    Kathryn L. Ossian, Mark Bisard, Ryan M. Garcia, Ali Kazemi, Gillian M. Lusins, Barry Rosenfeld

The purchase price of this Web Program includes the following articles from the Course Handbook available online:


  • COMPLETE COURSE HANDBOOK
  • Friending, Tagging and Tweeting: Social Media Overview
    Aaron P. Rubin, John F. Delaney
  • Social Media in the Workplace: Emerging Issues (October 31, 2016)
    Jill L. Rosenberg, Julie A. Totten
  • Socially Aware: The Law and Business of Social Media
    John F. Delaney
  • Federal Trade Commission, .com Disclosures: How to Make Effective Disclosures in Digital Advertising (March 2013)
    Tanya L. Forsheit
  • Frankfurt Kurnit Klein & Selz Law Alerts
    Tanya L. Forsheit
  • Federal Trade Commission, In the Matter of Nomi Technologies, Inc., File No. 132 3251
    Tanya L. Forsheit
  • Digital Advertising Alliance, Application of Self-Regulatory Principles to the Mobile Environment (July 2013)
    Tanya L. Forsheit
  • California Department of Justice Resources
    Tanya L. Forsheit
  • California Department of Justice, Staying Private in Public
    D. Reed Freeman
  • Federal Trade Commission Resources
    D. Reed Freeman
  • Network Advertising Initiative, 2015 Update to the NAI Mobile Application Code
    D. Reed Freeman
  • United States v. Path, Inc., No. C13-0448 (N.D. Cal. Jan. 31, 2013)
    D. Reed Freeman
  • Legal Ethics and Social Media
    Kathy L. Rose
  • Social Media and the Law, The Social Media Phenomenon, Chapter 1 (PLI–3/16, First Edition)
    Kathryn L. Ossian
  • Ossian Law, P.C. IT Law Alerts
    Kathryn L. Ossian

Presentation Material


  • Social Media Law: An Overview of Key Issues
  • Social Media in the Workplace: Emerging Issues
  • Legal Ethics and Social Media
Chairperson(s)
John F. Delaney ~ Morrison & Foerster LLP
Moderator(s)
D. Reed Freeman, Jr. ~ WilmerHale
Kathryn L. Ossian ~ Ossian Law P.C.
Speaker(s)
Kelly Ann Bird ~ Gibbons P.C.
Mark Bisard ~ Vice President & Senior Counsel, American Express - General Counsel's Office - Cyberlaw Unit
Jarad Brown ~ Attorney, Division of Privacy & Identity Protection, Federal Trade Commission
Ryan M. Garcia ~ Legal Director, Dell Inc.
Ali Kazemi ~ General Counsel, Squarespace
Gillian M. Lusins ~ Senior Vice President, Content Production & Risk , NBCUniversal Media, LLC
Heather L. Maples ~ Senior Special Counsel, U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission
Kathy Rose ~ Adjunct Lecturer-in-Law, Professional Responsibility, Simpson Thacher & Bartlett LLP and Columbia University School of Law
Barry Rosenfeld ~ Vice President & General Counsel, Novartis Finance Corporation
Aaron P. Rubin ~ Morrison & Foerster LLP
Noah Stein ~ Assistant Attorney General, Bureau of Internet & Technology , NY State Office of Attorney General
General credit information about this format appears below. For credit information specific to this program, please choose your jurisdiction(s) in the Credit Information box on the right-hand side of this page.

PLI’s live and on-demand webcasts are single-user license products intended for an individual registrant only. Credit will be issued only to the individual registered.


U.S. MCLE States

Alabama:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “online” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of online programs per reporting period.

Alaska:  All PLI products can fulfill Alaska’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Arizona:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “interactive CLE” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via interactive CLE programs.

Arkansas:  PLI’s on-demand web programs are not approved for Arkansas CLE credit.

California:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “participatory” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via participatory programs.

Colorado:  All PLI products can fulfill Colorado’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Connecticut: Effective January 1, 2017, all PLI products can fulfill Connecticut’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Delaware:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “eCLE” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of eCLE per reporting period, no more than 6 of which may be audio-only.

Florida:  All PLI products can fulfill Florida’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Georgia:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “in-house” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 in-house credits per reporting period.

Hawaii:  All PLI products can fulfill Hawaii’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Idaho:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 15 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Illinois:  All PLI products can fulfill Illinois' CLE requirements for experienced attorneys. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Indiana:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “distance education” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of distance education per reporting period.

Iowa:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “unmoderated” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of unmoderated programs per reporting period.

Kansas:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “non-traditional” credit. Attorneys are limited to 5 credits of non-traditional programs per reporting period.

Kentucky:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “non-live” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 non-live credits per reporting period.

Louisiana:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 4 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Maine:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 5.5 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Minnesota:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “on-demand” credit. Attorneys are limited to 15 on-demand credits per reporting period.

Mississippi:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “distance learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of distance learning per reporting period.

Missouri:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Montana:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 5 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Nebraska:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “computer-based learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 5 credits of computer-based learning per reporting period.

Nevada:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via self-study programs.

New Hampshire:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of self-study per reporting period.

New Jersey:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “alternative verifiable learning formats” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of alternative verifiable learning formats per reporting period.

New Mexico:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 4 credits of self-study per reporting period.

New York

Experienced Attorneys:  All PLI products can fulfill New York’s CLE requirements for experienced attorneys. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Newly Admitted Attorneys:  PLI’s transitional on-demand web programs can be used to fulfill the requirements for New York newly admitted attorneys. Only professional practice and law practice management credits may be earned via transitional on-demand web programs. Ethics and skills credits may not be earned via on-demand web programs.

North Carolina:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “online” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of online programs per reporting period.

North Dakota:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 15 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Ohio:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Oklahoma:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “online, on-demand” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of online, on-demand programs per reporting period.

Oregon:  All PLI products can fulfill Oregon’s CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Pennsylvania:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “distance learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of distance learning per reporting period.

Puerto Rico:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “non-traditional” credit. Attorneys are limited to 8 credits of non-traditional programs per reporting period.

Rhode Island:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “on-demand” credit. Attorneys are limited to 3 on-demand credits per reporting period.

South Carolina:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “alternatively delivered” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of alternatively delivered programs per reporting period.

Tennessee:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “distance learning” credit. Attorneys are limited to 8 credits of distance learning per reporting period.

Texas:  All PLI products can fulfill Texas’ CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Utah:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Vermont:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 10 credits of self-study per reporting period.

Virgin Islands:  All PLI products can fulfill the Virgin Islands’ CLE requirements. There is no limit to the number of credits an attorney can earn via PLI products.

Virginia:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “pre-recorded” credit. Attorneys are limited to 8 credits of pre-recorded programs per reporting period.

Washington:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “A/V” credit. Attorneys are limited to 22.5 credits of A/V programs per reporting period.

West Virginia:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “online” credit. Attorneys are limited to 12 credits of online instruction per reporting period.

Wisconsin:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “repeated, on-demand” credit. Attorneys are limited to 10 credits of repeated, on-demand programs per reporting period. No ethics credits can be earned via on-demand web programs.

Wyoming:  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Attorneys are limited to 6 credits of self-study per reporting period.


CPD Jurisdictions

British Columbia (CPD-BC):  PLI’s on-demand web programs are not eligible for CPD-BC credit unless viewed with at least one other attorney or an articled student. In this case, the credit must be recorded as a “study group.”

Ontario (CPD-ON):  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “recorded” credit. If viewed without a colleague, attorneys are limited to 6 credits of recorded programs per year. If viewed with at least one colleague, there is no limit to the number of credits that can be earned via recorded programs.

Quebec (CPD-QC):  PLI’s on-demand web programs can fulfill Quebec’s CPD requirements.

Hong Kong (CPD-HK):  PLI’s on-demand web programs are not approved for CPD-HK credit.

United Kingdom (CPD-UK):  PLI’s on-demand web programs can fulfill the United Kingdom’s CPD requirements.

Australia (CPD-AUS):  PLI’s on-demand web programs may fulfill Australia’s CPD requirements. Credit limits for on-demand web programs vary according to jurisdiction. Please refer to your jurisdiction’s CPD information page for specifics.


Other Credit Types

CPE Credit (NASBA):  Select on-demand web programs qualify as “QAS Self-Study” credit. Please check the Credit Information box on the right-hand side of this page to verify CPE credit availability.

IRS Continuing Education (IRS-CE):  PLI’s on-demand web programs may fulfill IRS-CE requirements. To request IRS-CE credit, please notify PLI at plicredits@pli.edu of your request and include your Preparer Tax Identification Number (PTIN).

Certified Fraud Examiner CPE:  PLI’s on-demand web programs may fulfill Certified Fraud Examiner CPE requirements. To request CPE credit or find out which programs offer CPE, please contact PLI at plicredits@pli.edu.

IAPP Continuing Privacy Credit (CPE):  PLI’s on-demand web programs may fulfill Privacy CPE credit requirements.

HR Recertification (HRCI):  PLI’s on-demand web programs may fulfill HR credit requirements.

SHRM Recertification (SHRM):  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as "self-paced" credit. SHRM professionals are limited to 30 credits of self-paced programs per recertification period.

Compliance Certification Board (CCB):  PLI’s on-demand web programs qualify as “self-study” credit. Candidates are limited to 10 self-study credits per 12-month period, and certification holders are limited to 20 self-study credits per 2-year renewal period.

Certified Anti-Money Laundering Specialists Certification (CAMS):  PLI’s on-demand web programs are not approved for CAMS credit.

New York State Social Worker Continuing Education (SW CPE):  PLI’s on-demand web programs are not approved for SW CPE credit.

 

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Great practical tips that I can use immediately in my in-house practice. All speakers were great... Thanks for a great program.”

“Extremely informative and great dialogue.”

“Extremely interesting and well presented.”

2016 Attendees

“Great program and learned a tremendous amount about my professional responsibilities in a digital age. The written materials were excellent and helped me to understand the many facets of digital security in the legal world.”

Adam Wallwork, Osler Hoskin & Harcourt LLP

“One of the better presentations I have seen. Very good focus on applying law to practice. Especially liked the ethics presentation.”

Benjamin Huffman, Winston & Strawn LLP

“Very informative day.”

Kathleen Pettit, Boston, MA


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