TreatiseTreatise

Faber on Mechanics of Patent Claim Drafting (6th Edition)

 by Robert Faber
 
 Copyright: 2008-2014
 Last Updated: July 2014

 Product Details >> 

Product Details

  • ISBN Number: 9781402411342
  • Page Count: 900
  • Number of Volumes: 1
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More patent applications are rejected because of claim-drafting flaws than because of problems with inventions.

A trusted working tool for more than two decades, PLI’s Faber on Mechanics of Patent Claim Drafting gives you the clear and complete guidance you need to draft foolproof claims for any type of invention.

Faber on Mechanics of Patent Claim Drafting spotlights proven claim-drafting practices and techniques that have been firmly established by patent authorities and custom. This lucid, timesaving handbook offers you start-to-finish directions on how to craft claims for different types of inventions; real-world examples of effective claim drafting; insight into the accepted words and phrases you should use in specific drafting situations; instruction on how to describe structures in the drawings; and numerous tips on how to avoid common claim-drafting mistakes. Included are helpful glossaries of patent terms and the mechanical terms used in drawings.

Updated at least annually, Faber on Mechanics of Patent Claim Drafting is an indispensable guide for patent specialists and other intellectual property attorneys, corporate counsel, non-specialists who represent inventors, patent officials, and inventors.

”Bob Faber is the guru in the claim drafting area.” 
 —Jack A. O’Brien, Law Offices of Jack A. O’Brien, P.C.

”This work must be included in the library of anyone who considers himself or herself an attorney [in the field].”
—The Licensing Journal

”Truly useful to practitioners at all levels of experience … a must-have.”
 —IP Law Weekly

  Table of Contents
  Preface
  Introduction
Chapter 1: Statutory Provisions—Some Basic Principles
  • § 1:1 : The Statute1-1
  • § 1:2 : Omnibus Claims1-3
  • § 1:3 : The Statutory Classes1-4
  • § 1:4 : Statutory Eligibility Under 35 U.S.C. § 1011-7
  • § 1:5 : Double Patenting1-20
Chapter 2: Claim Forms and Formats in General
  • § 2:1 : Placement After Specification2-1
  • § 2:2 : Single Sentence2-2
  • § 2:3 : Numbering and Order2-3
  • § 2:4 : Preamble2-4
  • § 2:5 : Transition from Preamble to Body—“Comprising” and Other Open-Ended Terms2-17
  • § 2:6 : “Consisting”—“Consisting Essentially of” and Other Closed-Ended Transition Terms2-22
  • § 2:7 : Body of the Claim2-25
  • § 2:8 : Format and Punctuation; Subparagraph Form2-26
  • § 2:9 : Dependent Claims2-28
  • § 2:10 : Independent Claims2-47
  • § 2:11 : Multiple Dependent Claims2-48
  • § 2:12 : Fees Payable for Claims2-53
  • § 2:13 : Amending a Filed Claim and Equivalence2-54
Chapter 3: Apparatus or Machine Claims
  • § 3:1 : In General3-2
    • § 3:1.1 : Example I—Shaker3-2
  • § EXAMPLE I: : Shaker3-4
  • § 3:2 : Preambles for Apparatus Claims3-5
  • § 3:3 : Elements of Apparatus Claims3-7
  • § 3:4 : Workpiece or Environmental Element3-10
  • § 3:5 : Negative Limitations3-13
  • § 3:6 : Support in Specification and Drawings3-14
  • § 3:7 : Naming the Elements3-18
  • § 3:8 : Plain Meaning of Claim Terms3-27
  • § 3:9 : Importing the Specification into the Claims3-40
  • § 3:10 : Specification Words of Criticality3-54
  • § 3:11 : Singular and Plural Elements3-57
  • § 3:12 : Double Inclusion of Elements3-63
  • § 3:13 : Use of Reference Numerals in Claims3-64
  • § 3:14 : Antecedents; Indefiniteness (“A” versus “The”)3-65
  • § 3:15 : Relative Terminology3-69
  • § 3:16 : Alternative Expressions3-73
  • § 3:17 : Parts or Features of Elements3-76
  • § 3:18 : Claiming Holes3-79
  • § 3:19 : Words of Approximation—“Substantially” et al.3-79
  • § 3:20 : Numerical Ranges and Amounts3-87
  • § 3:21 : Order of Elements3-91
  • § 3:22 : Tying the Elements Together3-93
  • § EXAMPLE II: : Shaker Sketch3-95
  • § 3:23 : Structural Connection3-95
  • § 3:24 : Functional or Operational Expressions3-97
  • § 3:25 : Claiming Desired Results; Overly Broad Functional Statements3-101
  • § 3:26 : “Whereby” Clauses3-107
  • § 3:27 : Location of Functional Clauses3-110
  • § 3:28 : Optional Word Clauses3-111
  • § 3:29 : “Means” or “Step” Clauses3-112
    • § 3:29.1 : Statutory Definition3-112
    • § 3:29.2 : Patent Office Guidelines3-116
    • § 3:29.3 : Use of “Means for” or “Step for”3-117
    • § 3:29.4 : Function of the Means3-118
    • § 3:29.5 : Reciting a Structure That Performs the Function3-118
    • § 3:29.6 : Presumption from Use of Word “Means”3-120
    • § 3:29.7 : Structural Elements of the Means, Not a Means-Plus-Function Clause3-122
    • § 3:29.8 : Other Words Than “Means” As a Means-Plus-Function Element3-126
    • § 3:29.9 : “For” Not Required to Be a Means-Plus-Function Element3-131
    • § 3:29.10 : Use Specification to Define the Means3-131
    • § 3:29.11 : Specification Must Describe the Means3-136
    • § 3:29.12 : Doctrine of Equivalents Versus Means-Plus-Function Equivalents3-143
    • § 3:29.13 : Do Not Use Means Clauses for Some Purposes3-144
    • § 3:29.14 : Single Means Claims3-145
    • § 3:29.15 : Single-Word Claim3-146
    • § 3:29.16 : Means at the Point of Novelty3-147
    • § 3:29.17 : Means Clauses Where Function Is to Be Claimed3-148
    • § 3:29.18 : Do Not Use the Word “Means” After the Noun to Be Claimed3-150
    • § 3:29.19 : Means Element in a Computer-Implemented Invention3-154
    • § 3:29.20 : Step-for Elements3-155
    • § 3:29.21 : Example III—Take-Up Barrel3-158
  • § EXAMPLE III: : Take-Up Barrel3-160
  • § 3:30 : Electrical Circuit Claims3-160
  • § EXAMPLE IV: : Radio Signal3-162
  • § EXAMPLE V: : Wheatstone Bridge3-165
Chapter 4: Method or Process Claims
  • § 4:1 : In General4-1
  • § 4:2 : Elements of Method Claims4-4
  • § 4:3 : Order of Steps4-8
  • § 4:4 : Obvious Method Using Novel Starting Material or Producing Unobvious Product4-10
  • § 4:5 : Claims to Both Method and Apparatus; Method Is Function of Apparatus4-12
  • § 4:6 : Apparatus Limitations4-13
  • § 4:7 : Chemical Processes4-15
  • § 4:8 : Electrical Methods4-18
  • § 4:9 : Bilski and Computer-Implemented Methods and Business Methods4-19
  • § 4:10 : Claims to a Computer Program or Software-Related Invention4-28
  • § 4:11 : Business Methods4-41
Chapter 5: Other Types of Claims
  • § 5:1 : Articles of Manufacture5-1
  • § 5:2 : Product-by-Process Claims5-4
  • § 5:3 : Reissue Patent Claims5-10
  • § 5:4 : Design Claims5-12
  • § 5:5 : Claims in Continuing Applications5-13
  • § 5:6 : Plant Patent Claims5-15
  • § 5:7 : Provisional Applications5-16
Chapter 6: Composition of Matter Claims—Chemical Cases
  • § 6:1 : In General6-1
  • § 6:2 : “Markush” Expressions6-4
  • § 6:3 : Trademarked Materials; Arbitrary Names6-11
  • § 6:4 : Special Claims for Chemical Cases—Fingerprint Claims6-13
  • § 6:5 : Coined Name Claims6-16
  • § 6:6 : Claims Referring to Drawings6-17
  • § 6:7 : Use Claims and New Use Claims; Preamble Limitations6-20
  • § 6:8 : Improvement or “Jepson-Type” Claims6-27
  • § 6:9 : Generic and Species Claims6-33
  • § 6:10 : Combination and Subcombination6-36
Chapter 7: Claims of Varying Scope
  • § 7:1 : In General7-1
  • § 7:2 : Claiming Different Classes of Invention in One Patent7-3
  • § 7:3 : Method Claim Satisfied by One or More Entities7-5
Chapter 8: Nonart Rejections
  • § 8:1 : Introduction8-1
  • § 8:2 : Duplicate Claiming and Claim Differentiation8-1
  • § 8:3 : Double Patenting8-4
  • § 8:4 : Undue Multiplicity8-5
  • § 8:5 : Old Combination; Overclaiming8-7
  • § 8:6 : Aggregation8-13
  • § 8:7 : Printed Matter8-15
  • § 8:8 : Incomplete8-17
  • § 8:9 : Vague and Indefinite8-18
  • § 8:10 : Prolixity8-20
  • § 8:11 : New Matter8-21
Chapter 9: Claiming Biotechnology Inventions
  • § 9:1 : In General9-1
  • § 9:2 : Claims to Living Organisms, e.g., Animals and Plants9-3
  • § 9:3 : Claims Based on a Biological Deposit9-8
  • § 9:4 : Claims to Nucleic Acids and Proteins9-10
  • § 9:5 : Claims to DNA9-13
  • § 9:6 : Novelty9-15
  • § 9:7 : Obviousness of DNA Inventions9-17
  • § 9:8 : Obviousness of Biotechnology Process Claims9-20
  • § 9:9 : Sufficient Written Description and Utility of Nucleic Acid9-24
  • § 9:10 : Enablement for DNA and Protein Claims9-26
  • § 9:11 : Claims to Monoclonal Antibodies (MAbs)9-30
  • § 9:12 : Claims to Therapeutics9-32
  • § 9:13 : Claims for Gene Therapy9-36
Chapter 10: Thoughts on Writing a Claim
  • § 10:1 : Writing Claims10-2
    • § 10:1.1 : Goals of Claim Writing10-2
      • [A] : Covering the Invention10-2
      • [B] : Claims Coverage Should Be As Broad As Possible10-3
      • [C] : Cover Competing Products or Methods10-4
      • [D] : Avoid the Prior Art10-5
      • [E] : No Unnecessary Limits10-5
    • § 10:1.2 : How to Write the Broad Claim10-6
      • [A] : Use Different Classes of Claims and Different Perspectives10-6
      • [B] : The Goal or Objective of the Invention10-7
      • [C] : The Inventor’s Way of Achieving the Objective or Goal10-8
      • [D] : Writing the Claim10-8
      • [E] : Claiming Individual Claim Features10-11
      • [F] : Revising the Claim After Writing It or Later Amending a Filed Claim10-15
      • [G] : Alternate Claim Drafting Techniques10-17
    • § 10:1.3 : Claiming Plural Embodiments10-18
      • [A] : The Generic Claim10-18
      • [B] : Use Enough Claims to Completely Cover the Invention10-19
    • § 10:1.4 : Claiming an Important Function in a Product Claim10-20
      • [A] : “Whereby” Clauses10-21
  • § 10:2 : The Means Clause10-22
    • § 10:2.1 : Avoid Overbroad Means Clause10-22
    • § 10:2.2 : Use of Means Clause10-22
  • § 10:3 : Method Claim10-28
    • § 10:3.1 : Sample Method Claim10-28
    • § 10:3.2 : Elements of a Method Claim10-30
    • § 10:3.3 : In a Method Claim, a Product Is Not Being Claimed10-31
    • § 10:3.4 : A Dependent Method Claim10-31
    • § 10:3.5 : A Step for Accomplishing a Particular Function10-33
    • § 10:3.6 : No Physical Interrelationship of Claimed Steps10-33
    • § 10:3.7 : Review the Claim After Writing10-34
  • § 10:4 : Article of Manufacture Claims10-34
  • § 10:5 : Product-by-Process Claims10-35
  • § 10:6 : The Jepson Claim10-39
  • § 10:7 : Particular Points Related to Good Claim Drafting10-42
    • § 10:7.1 : Preamble10-42
    • § 10:7.2 : Subparagraph Claim Form10-43
    • § 10:7.3 : Multiple Dependent Claims10-44
    • § 10:7.4 : Inferential Claiming10-44
  • § 10:8 : Review of Some Basics10-46
    • § 10:8.1 : Random Thoughts on How to Draft Claims to Mechanical Apparatus10-46
Appendix A: Claim-Drafting Principles and Practice in Claim-Drafting Techniques
Appendix B: The Art of Describing Structures in Patent Drawings Including a Glossary of Mechanical Terms
Appendix C1: Primary Sources: Title 35 United States Code (Selected Sections)
Appendix C2: Primary Sources: Rules of Practice (Selected Sections)
Appendix C3: Primary Sources: Manual of Patent Examining Procedure (Selected Sections)
Appendix D: Glossary and Index of Patent Terms
  Table of Authorities
  Index

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